Crinaeae

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In Greek mythology, the Crinaeae ( /krˈn/ ; Ancient Greek: Κρηναῖαι, from Greek "krini") were a type of Naiad nymphs associated with fountains or wells. [1]

Contents

The number of Crinaeae includes but is not limited to:

See also

Notes

  1. Bane, Theresa (2013). Encyclopedia of Fairies in World Folklore and Mythology. McFarland, Incorporated, Publishers. p. 90. ISBN   9780786471119.
  2. Pausanias, Graeciae Descriptio 9.29.3; Virgil, Eclogae 10.12
  3. Ovid, Remedia Amoris 659; Ars Amatoria 1.81 & 3.451
  4. Bane, Theresa (2013). Encyclopedia of Fairies in World Folklore and Mythology. McFarland, Incorporated, Publishers. pp. 14, 90. ISBN   9780786471119.
  5. Pausanias, Graeciae Descriptio 8.31.4
  6. Pausanias, Graeciae Descriptio 1.40.1

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