Cross of Merit with Swords (Poland)

Last updated
Cross of Merit with Swords
Brazowy Krzyz Zaslugi z Mieczami zdjecie.jpg
Bronze grade of current Cross of Merit with Swords.
Awarded by the President of Poland
CountryFlag of Poland.svg  Poland
TypeMedal awarded in three grades: Gold, Silver, Bronze.
Awarded forDeeds of bravery and valor not connected with direct combat, and for merit demonstrated in perilous circumstances.
StatusIn the award system but a wartime decoration only
Statistics
EstablishedOctober 19, 1942
Precedence
Next (higher) Cross of Merit for Bravery
Next (lower) Cross of Merit

The Cross of Merit with Swords (Polish : Krzyż Zasługi z Mieczami) is a Polish military award established October 19, 1942, by the Polish Government in Exile.

Polish language West Slavic language spoken in Poland

Polish is a West Slavic language of the Lechitic group. It is spoken primarily in Poland and serves as the native language of the Poles. In addition to being an official language of Poland, it is also used by Polish minorities in other countries. There are over 50 million Polish-language speakers around the world and it is one of the official languages of the European Union.

Contents

Criteria

The Cross of Merit with Swords is awarded for deeds of bravery and valor during time of war not connected with direct combat, and for merit demonstrated in perilous circumstances. The cross may be awarded twice in each grade to the same person. [1]

Grades

The Order has three grades: [1]

1. Gold Cross of Merit with Swords POL Zloty Krzyz Zaslugi z Mieczami BAR.svg
2. Silver Cross of Merit with Swords POL Srebrny Krzyz Zaslugi z Mieczami BAR.svg
3. Bronze Cross of Merit with Swords POL Brazowy Krzyz Zaslugi z Mieczami BAR.svg

Recipients

Related Research Articles

<i>Croix de Guerre</i> class of French military award

The Croix de Guerre is a military decoration of France. It was first created in 1915 and consists of a square-cross medal on two crossed swords, hanging from a ribbon with various degree pins. The decoration was awarded during World War I, again in World War II, and in other conflicts. The Croix de Guerre was also commonly bestowed on foreign military forces allied to France.

Władysław Anders Polish Army general

Władysław Albert Anders was a general in the Polish Army and later in life a politician and prominent member of the Polish government-in-exile in London.

German Cross military award of Nazi Germany

The German Cross was instituted by Adolf Hitler on 28 September 1941. It was awarded in two divisions: gold for repeated acts of bravery or achievement in combat; and silver for distinguished non-combat war service. The German Cross in Gold ranked higher than the Iron Cross First Class but below the Knight's Cross of the Iron Cross, while the German Cross in Silver ranked higher than the War Merit Cross First Class with Swords but below the Knight's Cross of the War Merit Cross with Swords.

Bolesław Bronisław Duch Polish Major General and General Inspector of the Armed Forces

Bolesław Bronisław Duch (1885–1980) was a Polish Major General and General Inspector of the Armed Forces.

Cross of Merit (Poland)

The Cross of Merit is a Polish civil state decoration established on June 23, 1923, to recognize services to the state.

Spanish Cross award

The Spanish Cross was a distinguished award of Germany given to German troops who participated in the Spanish Civil War, fighting for nationalist general, later Spanish caudillo, Francisco Franco.

Indian Order of Merit award

The Indian Order of Merit (IOM) was a military and civilian decoration of British India. It was established in 1837, although following the Partition of India in 1947 it was decided to discontinue the award and in 1954 a separate Indian honours system was developed, to act retrospectively to 1947. For a long period of time the IOM was the highest decoration that a native member of the British Indian Army could receive and initially it had three divisions. This was changed in 1911 when Indian servicemen became eligible for the Victoria Cross. A civilian division of the IOM also existed between 1902 and 1939, however, it was only conferred very rarely.

South African orders, decorations and medals are those military and civilian orders, decorations and medals issued by the Government of South Africa. The following is a (non-exhaustive) list of these:

Military Merit Cross (Bavaria) award from Bavaria

The Bavarian Military Merit Cross (Militär-Verdienstkreuz) was that kingdom's main decoration for bravery and military merit for enlisted soldiers. It was intended "to reward extraordinary merit by non-commissioned officers, soldiers, and lower-ranking officials." It was originally established on July 19, 1866 as the 5th Class of the Military Merit Order, which was the main decoration for bravery and military merit for officers and higher-ranking officials. Civilians acting in support of the army were also made eligible for the decoration.

Military Merit Medal (Austria-Hungary) award

The Military Merit Medal was a military decoration of the Empire of Austria-Hungary. It was founded by Emperor Franz Joseph I on March 12, 1890. The Military Merit Medal is often referred to as the "Signum Laudis" after the inscription on the reverse of the medal.

House and Merit Order of Peter Frederick Louis

The House and Merit Order of Duke Peter Frederick Louis or proper German Oldenburg House and Merit Order of Duke Peter Frederick Louis was a civil and military order of the Grand Duchy of Oldenburg, a member state of the German Empire. The order was founded by Grand Duke Augustus of Oldenburg on November 27, 1838, to honor his father, Peter Frederick Louis of Oldenburg. It became obsolete in 1918 after the abdication of the last grand duke.

Order <i>pro Merito Melitensi</i> award

The Order pro Merito Melitensi is the order of merit of the Sovereign Military Order of Malta, established in 1920. It is awarded to recipients who have brought honour to the Sovereign Military Order of Malta, promoted Christian values and charity as defined by the Roman Catholic Church. Unlike Knights or Dames of the Order of Malta, those decorated with the Order pro Merito Melitensi are not invested in a religious ceremony, do not swear any oath or make any religious commitment. It may therefore be bestowed upon non-Catholics. Conferees include prominent statesmen, such as Presidents Ronald Reagan, who received it while still in office, and George H.W. Bush.

During World War II the Independent State of Croatia awarded a number of orders, decorations and medals.

Nikodem Sulik-Sarnowski, who used the noms de guerre "Jodko", "Jod", "Karol", and "Sarnowski", was an officer of the Russian Imperial Army, and Generał brygady of the Polish Army.

The Order of Bravery is a Bulgarian order during the Kingdom of Bulgaria and the Republic of Bulgaria. It is the most esteemed Bulgarian order and the second highest in the Kingdom of Bulgaria and fourth highest in the Republic of Bulgaria. It exists since 1880 with interruption between 1946 and 2003.

Albert Order order

The Albert Order was created on 31 December 1850 by King Frederick Augustus II of Saxony to commemorate Albert III, Duke of Saxony. It was to be awarded to anyone who had served the state well, for civil virtue, science and art.

Medal for voluntary military service

The Medal for voluntary military service is a French military decoration established on 13 March 1975 by decree 75-150. It was established in three grades to recognize voluntary military service in the reserves.

Stanisław Szostak Polish military leader

Stanisław Szostak was a colonel of the Polish Armoured Corps.

The following is a comprehensive list of orders, decorations, and medals bestowed by the Sovereign Military Order of Malta, both in the present-day and historically.

Honour medal of Foreign Affairs

Known for a long time as the President’s medal, the Honour medal of Foreign Affairs is a state decoration bestowed by the French Republic in the form of an honour medal for work. It was originally created by a Royal decree of 28 July 1816 as a single grade medal to reward acts of courage displayed by French nationals on foreign soil. An 1861 Imperial decree saw it be split into the silver and gold grades. The year 1887 saw the addition of swords to the medal for award to both French or allied military personnel for acts of courage in favour of the French in time of war. Although still bestowed in wartime for courage, the modern award is now aimed at rewarding civil servants of the ministry for Foreign Affairs.

References

  1. 1 2 "Odznaczenia wojenne". The official website of the President of the Republic of Poland (in Polish). Retrieved 17 November 2012.External link in |work= (help)
  2. Letter from Ministry of Defence, 11 June 2003