Cusack Park (Mullingar)

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Cusack Park
Páirc Uí Chíosóig
Cusack Park Mullingar Main Stand.jpg
Cusack Park Mullingar
Cusack Park (Mullingar)
LocationFriars Mill Road, Mullingar, County Westmeath, N91 NXV5, Ireland
Coordinates 53°31′40.83″N7°20′18.75″W / 53.5280083°N 7.3385417°W / 53.5280083; -7.3385417 Coordinates: 53°31′40.83″N7°20′18.75″W / 53.5280083°N 7.3385417°W / 53.5280083; -7.3385417
Public transitCastle Street bus stop
Mullingar railway station
Owner Westmeath GAA
Capacity 11,000
Field size140 x 82 m
Opened1933

Cusack Park (Páirc Uí Chíosóig in Irish), known for sponsorship reasons as TEG Cusack Park, is a GAA stadium in Mullingar, County Westmeath, Ireland. It is the main grounds of Westmeath GAA's Gaelic football and hurling teams.

The ground, named after GAA founder Michael Cusack, was opened in 1933 [1] and had a capacity of 15,000. However following a national review of health and safety at GAA grounds in 2011, the overall capacity was reduced to 11,000. [2]

See also

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References

  1. Ruth Illingworth, Mullingar Historical and Archaeological Society. "Mullingar Timeline". Archived from the original on 20 November 2008. Retrieved 7 September 2009.
  2. Westmeath Independent report, 14 December 2011