Cutback (football move)

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A cutback is a sudden change in direction by a ball carrier in American football, usually against the flow of the play. [1] One common type of cutback would be turning an end run into a run down the middle. [2] It is a common type of juke and the basis of the counter run.

American football Team field sport

American football, referred to as football in the United States and Canada and also known as gridiron, is a team sport played by two teams of eleven players on a rectangular field with goalposts at each end. The offense, which is the team controlling the oval-shaped football, attempts to advance down the field by running with or passing the ball, while the defense, which is the team without control of the ball, aims to stop the offense's advance and aims to take control of the ball for themselves. The offense must advance at least ten yards in four downs, or plays, and otherwise they turn over the football to the defense; if the offense succeeds in advancing ten yards or more, they are given a new set of four downs. Points are primarily scored by advancing the ball into the opposing team's end zone for a touchdown or kicking the ball through the opponent's goalposts for a field goal. The team with the most points at the end of a game wins.

End run

In gridiron football, an end run is a running play in which the player carrying the ball tries to avoid being tackled by running outside the end of the offensive line. It is distinct from a dive, which is a run "up the middle", or an off-tackle run, which is a run through the inside gap created by the offensive tackle. Most option attacks are based on the end run.

Juke (football move)

A juke is a move in most forms of American football used to evade a tackler by deception, and thus without need of a stiff arm. It can also be called sidestepping.

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Cutback may refer to:

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