Cynthia Lummis

Last updated

Cynthia Lummis
Cynthia Lummis U.S. Senator.jpg
United States Senator
from Wyoming
Assumed office
January 3, 2021
Servingwith John Barrasso
Preceded by Mike Enzi
Member of the U.S.HouseofRepresentatives
from Wyoming's at-large district
In office
January 3, 2009 January 3, 2017
Preceded by Barbara Cubin
Succeeded by Liz Cheney
27th Treasurer of Wyoming
In office
January 4, 1999 January 9, 2007
Governor Jim Geringer
Dave Freudenthal
Preceded byStan Smith
Succeeded by Joe Meyer
Member of the Wyoming Senate
from the 5th district
In office
January 14, 1993 January 10, 1995
Preceded byGary Yordy
Succeeded byDonald Lawler
Member of the WyomingHouseofRepresentatives
from the Laramie County district
In office
January 7, 1985 January 14, 1993
In office
January 8, 1979 January 3, 1983
Personal details
Born
Cynthia Marie Lummis

(1954-09-10) September 10, 1954 (age 66)
Cheyenne, Wyoming, U.S.
Political party Republican
Spouse(s)
(m. 1983;died 2014)
Children1
Education University of Wyoming (BS, JD)
Website Senate Website

Cynthia Marie Lummis Wiederspahn ( /ˈlʌmɪs/ LUMM-iss; born September 10, 1954) is an American politician and attorney serving as the junior United States Senator from Wyoming. She is the first woman to represent Wyoming in the Senate. [1] A member of the Republican Party, she served as the U.S. Representative for Wyoming's at-large congressional district from 2009 to 2017. Before joining Congress, she served as a State Representative (1979–83, 1985–93), State Senator (1993–95), and State Treasurer (1999–2007). She did not seek reelection to the House of Representatives in 2016, [2] and defeated Democratic nominee Merav Ben-David for the U.S. Senate in 2020. [3]

Contents

In January 2021, Lummis joined a group of Republican senators led by Ted Cruz objecting to counting Pennsylvania's electoral votes due to claims that the state violated its own election laws. Accordingly, on January 6, Lummis voted in support of the objection to Pennsylvania's electoral votes. The Senate rejected this objection by a vote of 92–7. She also voted against the objection to Arizona's electoral votes, which the Senate rejected by a vote of 93–6. [4] [5]

Early life and education

Lummis is one of four children born in Cheyenne, Wyoming, to Doran Lummis and the former Enid Bennett (1928–2013). [6] After high school, she enrolled in the University of Wyoming in Laramie, obtaining two Bachelor of Science degrees, one in animal science in 1976 and one in biology in 1978. [7] She received her Juris Doctor degree from the University of Wyoming in 1985 and clerked for the Wyoming Supreme Court. [7]

Wyoming state legislature

Lummis was a member of the Wyoming House of Representatives from 1979 to 1983 and from 1985 to 1993. She was a member of the Wyoming Senate from 1993 to 1995.

U.S. House of Representatives

Lummis was one of three female U.S. Representatives who prefer the appellation "congressman" to "congressperson" or "congresswoman"; the others were the Tennessee Republicans Marsha Blackburn and Diane Black, who have since left the House. [8]

Elections

2008

Lummis, who carried the support of anti-abortion and economically conservative voters, won the November 4 general election to succeed Barbara Cubin. In the August primary election, she defeated businessman and rancher Mark Gordon.

In the general election, Lummis faced Democratic nominee Gary Trauner, a Teton County School Board Trustee who ran against Cubin in 2006 and nearly won. [9] Trauner criticized Lummis for supporting privatization of Social Security and suggesting raising the retirement age for receiving such benefits; he called instead for considering imposing the FICA tax on income over $100,000, which is currently exempt. [10]

2010

Lummis was reelected with 71% of the vote against Democratic nominee David Wendt. [11]

2012

Lummis was reelected with 69% of the vote against Democratic nominee Chris Henrichsen.

2014

In October 2013, corrections officer Jason Adam Senteney announced that he would challenge Lummis in the 2014 Republican primary. Senteney opposed the 2013 government shutdown: "You should never shut down essential programs for people. ... Whether it's a negotiation tactic or not, you shouldn't punish the American people for your own failure to work together in Washington." [12]

Tenure

Lummis during the 111th United States Congress CynthiaLummis.jpg
Lummis during the 111th United States Congress

Lummis signed Americans for Tax Reform’s Taxpayer Protection Pledge. [13]

Timothy P. Carney of the Washington Examiner called Lummis one of Arizona Congressman Jeff Flake's "posse of anti-appropriators" on the Appropriations Committee. [14] According to Carney, Lummis "is the league leader in bucking the committee leadership". [14]

Legislation supported

Congresswoman Cynthia Lummis with colleagues Eric Cantor and Mary Fallin Cynthia Lummis 2.jpg
Congresswoman Cynthia Lummis with colleagues Eric Cantor and Mary Fallin

Committee assignments

United States House Committee on Natural Resources (2009–2011; 2013–2017)

Caucus memberships

United States Senate

Elections

After she retired from Congress in 2016, it was speculated that Lummis was considering a run for governor of Wyoming in 2018. [24] In late 2017, she ruled that out, saying that she was enjoying her time outside of public life but would likely run for office again later. [25] The Trump administration actively considered her for Secretary of the Interior after Ryan Zinke resigned, [26] but David Bernhardt was eventually appointed to the position. [27] On May 4, 2019, U.S. Senator Mike Enzi announced his retirement, leading to speculation that Lummis might run for his seat in the 2020 election. [28] On July 11, 2019, she announced her candidacy. [29] [30] She won the election. [31] In January 2021, Lummis joined a group of Republican senators, led by Josh Hawley and Ted Cruz, in an unsuccessful effort to overturn the results of the 2020 presidential election. She voted in support of the objection to Pennsylvania's electoral votes [32] and against the objection to Arizona's. [33] Both objections were rejected by the Senate, 92-7 and 93-6 respectively.

Tenure

Lummis was sworn in as senator on January 3, 2021. She is the only member of Wyoming's congressional delegation who was born in Wyoming.

Committees

Caucuses

Electoral history

State Treasurer

Wyoming State Treasurer election, 1998 [34] [35]
PartyCandidateVotes%
Republican Cynthia Lummis 105,322 62.69
Democratic Charyl "Butch" Loveridge52,65531.34
Libertarian James Blomquist10,0245.97
Wyoming State Treasurer Republican primary election, 2002 [36]
PartyCandidateVotes%
Republican Cynthia Lummis 79,557 100.00
Wyoming State Treasurer election, 2002 [37]
PartyCandidateVotes%
Republican Cynthia Lummis 152,583 100.00

U.S. Representative

Wyoming's at-large congressional district Republican primary election, 2008 [38]
PartyCandidateVotes%
Republican Cynthia Lummis 33,149 46.18
Republican Mark Gordon26,82737.37
Republican Bill Winney8,53711.89
Republican Michael S. Holland3,1714.56
Wyoming's at-large congressional district election, 2008 [39]
PartyCandidateVotes%
Republican Cynthia Lummis 131,244 52.62
Democratic Gary Trauner 106,75842.81
Libertarian W. David Herbert11,0304.42
N/A Write-in candidates 3630.15
Wyoming's at-large congressional district election Republican primary, 2010 [40]
PartyCandidateVotes%
Republican Cynthia Lummis 84,063 82.82
Republican Evan Liam Slafter17,14816.89
N/AWrite-in candidates2890.28
Wyoming's at-large congressional district election, 2010 [41]
PartyCandidateVotes%
Republican Cynthia Lummis 131,661 70.42
Democratic David Wendt45,76824.48
Libertarian John V. Love9,2534.95
N/AWrite-in candidates2870.15
Wyoming's at-large congressional district election, 2012 [42]
PartyCandidateVotes%
Republican Cynthia Lummis 166,452 68.89
Democratic Chris Henrichsen57,57323.83
Libertarian Richard P. Brubaker8,4423.49
Constitution Daniel Clyde Cummings4,9632.05
Wyoming Country PartyDon Wills3,7751.56
N/AWrite-in Candidates4160.17

Personal life

In 2008, Lummis reported her wealth as between $20 million to $75 million.[ citation needed ] In 2010, Roll Call ranked her as the 50th-wealthiest member of Congress, with a minimum net worth of $5.44 million. [43] Most of Lummis's wealth comes from her family-owned Arp and Hammond Company, Lummis Livestock Company, and Old Horse Pasture, Inc. [44] In 2016 she was inducted into the Cheyenne Frontier Days Hall of Fame. [45] Upon taking office in the Senate in 2021, she will be the first senator to own cryptocurrency; she bought Bitcoin in 2013 after her son-in-law advised her to. [46]

Lummis is a Lutheran. She is a Lutheran Church–Missouri Synod (LCMS) adherent. [47]

See also

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References

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  2. dougrandall (January 28, 2016). "Stubson Touts Wyoming Experience In Run For Congress". KGAB 650AM.
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  4. "Roll Call Vote 117th Congress - 1st Session". U.S. Senate. January 7, 2021. Retrieved January 7, 2021.
  5. "U.S. Senate: U.S. Senate Roll Call Votes 117th Congress - 1st Session". www.senate.gov. Retrieved January 10, 2021.
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  11. "State Results – Election Center 2010 – Elections & Politics from CNN.com". CNN.
  12. "Trevor Brown, Yoder man challenging Lummis in 2014 primary: Jason Senteney says Congress isn't working to solve budget issues, October 24, 2013". Wyoming Tribune-Eagle. Retrieved October 25, 2013.
  13. "The Taxpayer Protection Pledge Signers 112th Congressional List" (PDF). Americans for Tax Reform. Retrieved November 30, 2011.
  14. 1 2 Carney, Timothy (April 3, 2011) GOP anti-appropriators break up the spending party Archived April 5, 2011, at the Wayback Machine , Washington Examiner
  15. 1 2 3 Hancock, Laura (August 5, 2013). "Lummis-supported bills move forward". Casper Star-Tribune. Retrieved January 27, 2014.
  16. "H.R. 1684 – Summary". United States Congress. Retrieved January 27, 2014.
  17. Kasperowicz, Pete (November 19, 2013). "House advances drilling, fracking bills". The Hill. Retrieved November 21, 2013.
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  20. D'Amico, Christine (August 1, 2013). "Lummis, Cohen Draft Bill to Track Equal Access to Justice Act Payments Bipartisan legislation restarts agency tracking obligations; modernizes record-keeping with online database". House Office of Cynthia Lummis. Archived from the original on May 5, 2014. Retrieved May 5, 2014.
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  25. "Lummis says she won't run for governor, upending the field and opening 'the floodgates'". Casper Star-Tribune. September 20, 2017.
  26. "White House Considering Lummis for Interior Secretary, Sources Say". January 31, 2019 via www.bloomberg.com.
  27. Cohn, Alicia (April 11, 2019). "David Bernhardt confirmed as new Interior chief". The Hill.
  28. Reynolds, Nick (May 10, 2019). "Former Wyoming Rep. Cynthia Lummis considering 2020 Senate bid to replace Enzi". Casper Star-Tribune. Retrieved June 25, 2019.
  29. "Lummis Announces Run for U.S. Senate, Pledges to Stand 'Shoulder to Shoulder' with President Trump to Fight for WY". Sheridan Media. July 11, 2019. Retrieved July 11, 2019.
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  31. Bendix, Madison Hall, Aria. "Republican Cynthia Lummis nabs Wyoming's open Senate seat from Democratic challenger Merav Ben-David". Business Insider. Retrieved November 6, 2020.
  32. "On the Objection (Shall the Objection Submitted by the Gentleman from Pennsylvania, Mr. Perry, and the Senator from Missouri, Mr. Hawley, Be Sustained?)". United States Senate. January 7, 2021. Archived from the original on January 7, 2021. Retrieved January 7, 2021.
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  45. "Cheyenne Frontier Days Hall of Fame Inductees". Cheyenne Frontier Days Old West Museum. Retrieved October 29, 2018.
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U.S. House of Representatives
Preceded by
Barbara Cubin
Member of the U.S. House of Representatives
from Wyoming's at-large congressional district

2009–2017
Succeeded by
Liz Cheney
Preceded by
Jan Schakowsky
Chair of the Congressional Women's Caucus
2011–2013
Succeeded by
Jaime Herrera Beutler
Party political offices
Preceded by
Mike Enzi
Republican nominee for U.S. Senator from Wyoming
(Class 2)

2020
Most recent
U.S. Senate
Preceded by
Mike Enzi
U.S. Senator (Class 2) from Wyoming
2021–present
Served alongside: John Barrasso
Incumbent
U.S. order of precedence (ceremonial)
Preceded by
Ben Ray Luján
United States Senators by seniority
93rd
Succeeded by
Roger Marshall