Cyril Smith (actor)

Last updated

Cyril Smith
Cyrilsmithactor.jpg
Born(1892-04-04)4 April 1892
Died5 March 1963(1963-03-05) (aged 70)
London, England
OccupationActor
Years active1900 1962

Cyril Edward Bruce-Smith (4 April 1892 5 March 1963) was a Scottish actor who began his career as a child in 1900 and went on to appear in numerous stage plays as well as over 100 films between 1914 and his death almost 50 years later. The son of Frederick and Elsa Smith; his mother travelled with him on his engagements during his boyhood.

Contents

Career

Smith first became known as a child stage actor in 1900, and by the age of 13 in 1905, he travelled to New York to appear as Cosmo in a production of the J. M. Barrie play Alice-Sit-By-The Fire, opposite Ethel Barrymore; at the time, The New York Times hailed him as "one of the best-known child actors in England". [1] Smith's film career began in 1914 in the Wilfred Noy-directed Old St. Paul's and he appeared in almost 20 other silent films of the 1910s and 1920s before making the transition to sound. From the early 1930s until his death, he featured in dozens of films ranging from the quota quickies of the 1930s and the B-movies of the 1940s and 1950s, through to more prestigious productions starring names such as Vivien Leigh, Trevor Howard and Deborah Kerr. Smith was not a name-billed film actor, and many of his roles were uncredited bit parts or minor roles with generic titles such as "Publican", "Reporter" or "Bailiff"; however towards the end of his life he achieved several more prominent billings after finding a late-career niche portraying scatty and doddery elderly men. For instance, in 1956, he had a leading role in the Peggy Mount comedy, Sailor Beware! and a similar leading role in the Hylda Baker comedy, She Knows Y'Know (1962) . Smith also moved into television, as Merlin the magician in the 1956 ITV series The Adventures of Sir Lancelot which was also a success in the U.S. and as Harold Wormold in the first series of the BBC sitcom Hugh and I in 1962.

Smith suffered a heart attack in December 1962 and died on 5 March 1963, aged 70. [2]

Filmography

Related Research Articles

<span class="mw-page-title-main">Ward Bond</span> American actor (1903–1960)

Wardell Edwin Bond was an American film character actor who appeared in more than 200 films and starred in the NBC television series Wagon Train from 1957 to 1960. Among his best-remembered roles are Bert the cop in Frank Capra's It's a Wonderful Life (1946) and Captain Clayton in John Ford's The Searchers (1956).

<span class="mw-page-title-main">Wally Patch</span> English actor and comedian

Walter Sydney Vinnicombe was an English actor and comedian. He worked in film, television and theatre.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">Douglas Fowley</span> American actor (1911–1998)

Douglas Fowley was an American movie and television actor in more than 240 films and dozens of television programs, He is probably best remembered for his role as the frustrated movie director Roscoe Dexter in Singin' in the Rain (1952), and for his regular supporting role as Doc Holliday in The Life and Legend of Wyatt Earp. He is the father of rock and roll musician and record producer Kim Fowley.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">Regis Toomey</span> American actor (1898–1991)

John Francis Regis Toomey was an American film and television actor.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">Frank Jenks</span> American actor (1902–1962)

Frank Jenks was an acid-voiced American supporting actor of stage and films.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">J. Farrell MacDonald</span> American actor and director

John Farrell MacDonald was an American character actor and director. He played supporting roles and occasional leads. He appeared in over 325 films over a four-decade career from 1911 to 1951, and directed forty-four silent films from 1912 to 1917.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">Joe Sawyer</span> Canadian actor (1906–1982)

Joe Sawyer was a Canadian film actor. He appeared in more than 200 films between 1927 and 1962, and was sometimes billed under his birth name.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">Jack Pennick</span> American actor

Ronald Jack Pennick was an American film actor. After working as a gold miner as a young man, serving as a US Marine, he would go on to appear in more than 140 films between 1926 and 1962. Pennick was a leading member to in the informal John Ford Stock Company, appearing in dozens of the director's films. Pennick also drilled the military extras in John Wayne's The Alamo (1960).

<span class="mw-page-title-main">James Flavin</span> American actor (1906-1976)

James William Flavin Jr. was an American character actor whose career lasted for nearly half a century.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">Edward Gargan</span> American actor (died 1964)

Edward Gargan was an American film and television actor.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">James Burke (actor)</span> American actor (1886–1968)

James Michael Burke was an Irish-American film and television character actor born in New York City.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">Frank Sully</span> American actor (1908–1975)

Francis Thomas Sullivan, known professionally as Frank Sully, was an American film actor. He appeared in over 240 films between 1934 and 1968. Today's audiences know him best as the dumb detective in the Boston Blackie features, and as the foil in many Three Stooges comedies.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">Arthur Hambling</span> British actor (1888–1952)

Arthur Hambling was a British actor, on stage from 1912, and best known for appearances in the films Henry V (1944) and The Lavender Hill Mob (1951). In 1939 he appeared in the West End in N.C. Hunter's comedy Grouse in June.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">Bill Shine (actor)</span>

Wilfred William Dennis Shine was a British theatre, film and television actor. Shine was born into a family of theatre actors; among others, Shine's father, mother, grandmother, two uncles and an aunt had worked in theatre. His father Wilfred Shine was a theatre actor who also appeared in films during the 1920s and the 1930s. Bill Shine made his film debut in 1929, since which he appeared in over 160 films and television series. Towards the end of his career, he was best known for playing Inventor Black on children's television series Super Gran. In series two, episode four, of Mrs Thursday, 'The Duke and I', (1967), he played the Duke of Midlothian.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">James Millican</span> American actor (1911–1955)

James Millican was an American actor with over 200 film appearances mostly in western movies.

Mark Daly was a British film actor.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">George Merritt (actor)</span> English actor

Frederick George Merritt was an English theatre, film and television actor, often in authoritarian roles. He studied German theatre in Magdeburg, Germany, and taught at the Berlitz School at the outbreak of the First World War, when he was held as a British Civil Prisoner of War, and interned at Ruhleben, 1914–1918. He was involved in over 50 plays at Ruhleben. He lived for many years in Lissenden Gardens, Parliament Hill, north west London.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">Frederick Piper</span> English actor

Frederick Piper was an English actor of stage and screen who appeared in over 80 films and many television productions in a career spanning over 40 years. Piper studied drama under Elsie Fogerty at the Central School of Speech and Drama, then based at the Royal Albert Hall, London.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">Johnnie Schofield</span> British actor (1889–1955)

Johnnie William Schofield was a British actor, known for The Middle Watch (1948), Tawny Pipit (1944) and Melody of My Heart (1936).

<span class="mw-page-title-main">Ray Walker (actor)</span> American actor (1904–1980)

Warren Reynolds "Ray" Walker was an American actor, born in Newark, New Jersey, who starred in Baby Take a Bow (1934), Hideaway Girl (1936), The Dark Hour (1936), The Unknown Guest (1943) and It's A Wonderful Life (1946).

References

  1. "English Boy Actor Here" The New York Times, 1905-04-12. Retrieved 2010-02-09
  2. "Actor dies" Ottawa Citizen, 1963-06-03. Retrieved 2010-02-09