Cyrille Adoula

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  1. Council for Labour and Native Social Security
  2. General Federation of Belgian Labour
  3. Party of National Unity
  4. According to the British Survey, Adoula was only co-opted as a senator on a PUNA ticket due to his friendship with Jean Bolikango, leader of PUNA and a popular figure among the Bangala in Équateur Province. [10] Thomas Kanza wrote that the co-optation was achieved "with difficulty". [11]

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References

  1. Sandiford 2008, p. 18.
  2. Segal 1962, p. 166.
  3. 1 2 3 Akyeampong & Gates 2012, p. 95.
  4. 1 2 LaFontaine 1986, p. 220.
  5. 1 2 Klieman 2008, p. 179.
  6. Hoskyns 1965, p. 27.
  7. 1 2 Waters Jr. 2009, p. 2.
  8. 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 Akyeampong & Gates 2012, p. 96.
  9. Area Handbook 1962, p. 386.
  10. British Survey. 178–213. British Society for International Understanding. 1964. p. 3.
  11. 1 2 Kanza 1994, p. 168.
  12. Passemiers 2019, p. 58.
  13. Kanza 1994, p. 103.
  14. 1 2 Lentz 2014, p. 861.
  15. Paterson 1989, p. 263.
  16. Hoskyns 1965, p. 377.
  17. Hoskyns 1965, p. 379.
  18. Schmidt 2013, p. 69.
  19. 1 2 Young 1965, p. 345.
  20. Gibbs 1991, p. 147.
  21. 1 2 Schmidt 2013, pp. 69–70.
  22. Young 1965, pp. 547–548.
  23. "Congo-Zaïre: l'empire du crime permanent, Adoula, l'homme du Conclave de Lovanium" (in French). Le Phare. 27 September 2013. Retrieved 30 March 2017.
  24. Oron 1961, p. 63.
  25. Passemiers 2019, pp. 83–84.
  26. Mountz 2014, p. 50.
  27. Marcum, John (1969). The Angolan Revolution, Vol. I: The Anatomy of an Explosion (1950-1962). Massachusetts Institute of Technology Press (Cambridge). p. 65.
  28. Guimaraes 2001, pp. 54, 63.
  29. Mountz 2014, p. 153.
  30. Guimaraes 2001, p. 71.
  31. Passemiers 2019, p. 85.
  32. Passemiers 2019, pp. 86, 89.
  33. Passemiers 2019, p. 91.
  34. O'Ballance 1999, p. 65.
  35. Young 2015, p. 345.
  36. 1 2 O'Ballance 1999, p. 68.
  37. Tshombe 1967, p. 20.
  38. Waters Jr. 2009, p. 3.
  39. O'Ballance 1999, p. 85.
  40. "Political Appointments: Government Changes CONGO (DR)". Africa Research Bulletin. 1970. p. 1952.
  41. 1 2 American Opinion. 6. Belmont, Mass.: R. Welch, Inc. 1963. p. 45. ISSN   0003-0236.

References

Cyrille Adoula
Cyrille Adoula 1963.jpg
Adoula in 1963
4th Prime Minister of Congo-Léopoldville
In office
2 August 1961 30 June 1964
Political offices
Preceded by
Prime Minister of the Democratic Republic of the Congo
2 August 1961 – 30 June 1964
Succeeded by