Czech Republic national football team

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Contents

Czech Republic
Czech Republic national football team logo.svg
Association Football Association of the Czech Republic (FAČR)
Confederation UEFA (Europe)
Head coach Jaroslav Šilhavý
Captain Tomáš Souček
Most caps Petr Čech (124)
Top scorer Jan Koller (55)
Home stadium Various
FIFA code CZE
Kit left arm cze20H.png
Kit left arm.svg
Kit body cze20H.png
Kit body.svg
Kit right arm cze20H.png
Kit right arm.svg
Kit shorts.svg
Kit socks long.svg
First colours
Kit left arm cze21a.png
Kit left arm.svg
Kit body cze21a.png
Kit body.svg
Kit right arm cze21a.png
Kit right arm.svg
Kit shorts.svg
Kit socks long.svg
Second colours
FIFA ranking
Current 40 Steady2.svg (27 May 2021) [1]
Highest2 (September 1999; January – May 2000; April – May 2005; January – May 2006)
Lowest67 (March 1994)
First international
Flag of the Czech Republic.svg  Czechoslovakia 7–0 Yugoslavia  Flag of Yugoslavia (1918-1943).svg
(Antwerp, Belgium; 28 August 1920)
as Czech Republic:
Flag of Turkey.svg  Turkey 1–4 Czech Republic  Flag of the Czech Republic.svg
(Istanbul, Turkey; 23 February 1994)
Biggest win
Flag of the Czech Republic.svg  Czechoslovakia 7–0 Yugoslavia  Flag of Yugoslavia (1918-1943).svg
(Antwerp, Belgium; 28 August 1920)
Flag of the Czech Republic.svg  Czechoslovakia 7–0 Yugoslavia  Flag of Yugoslavia (1918-1943).svg
(Prague, Czechoslovakia; 28 October 1925)
as Czech Republic:
Flag of the Czech Republic.svg  Czech Republic 8–1 Andorra  Flag of Andorra.svg
(Liberec, Czech Republic; 4 June 2005)
Biggest defeat
Flag of Hungary (1915-1918, 1919-1946).svg  Hungary 8–3 Czechoslovakia  Flag of the Czech Republic.svg
(Budapest, Hungary; 19 September 1937)
as Czech Republic:
Flag of England.svg  England 5–0 Czech Republic  Flag of the Czech Republic.svg
(London, England; 22 March 2019)
World Cup
Appearances9 (first in 1934 )
Best resultRunners-up (1934, 1962, as Czechoslovakia), Group stage (2006, as Czech Republic)
European Championship
Appearances10 (first in 1960 )
Best resultChampions (1976, as Czechoslovakia), Runners-up (1996, as Czech Republic)
FIFA Confederations Cup
Appearances1 (first in 1997 )
Best resultThird place (1997)

The Czech Republic national football team (Czech : Česká fotbalová reprezentace) represents the Czech Republic in international football. The team is controlled by the Football Association of the Czech Republic (FAČR). Historically, the team participated in FIFA and UEFA competitions as Bohemia and Czechoslovakia.

Following the dissolution of Czechoslovakia, the first international competition of the Czech Republic was the UEFA Euro 1996, where they finished runners-up, and they have taken part in every European Championship since. Following the separation, they have featured in one FIFA World Cup, the 2006 tournament.

History

1990s

When Czechoslovakia split into the Czech Republic and Slovakia, the Czech Republic team was formed. They played their first friendly match away to Turkey on 23 February 1994. The newly-formed team played their first home game in Ostrava, against Lithuania, in which they registered their first home win.

Their first competitive match was part of the UEFA Euro 1996 qualifying campaign, in which they defeated Malta 6–1 in Ostrava. During the campaign, the Czech Republic registered six wins, three draws, and a defeat against Luxembourg, finishing their qualifying Group 5 in first place, ahead of group favourites the Netherlands. In the final tournament, hosted by England, the Czechs progressed from the group stage, despite a 2–0 opening game defeat to Germany. They progressed to the UEFA Euro 1996 Final, losing 2–1 to Germany at Wembley Stadium.

The Czechs finished third in the 1998 FIFA World Cup qualifying group, behind Spain and Yugoslavia, and subsequently missed the tournament.

2000s

The Czech Republic qualified for Euro 2000, winning all of their group games and conceding five goals. [2] In the finals the team were drawn in Group D, alongside France, the Netherlands and Denmark. [3] The team lost to the Netherlands after last-minute penalty [4] and lost the second match against France, which eliminated them from advancing to the knockout round. The Czech Republic managed a 2–0 win against Denmark in their final game courtesy of two goals from Vladimír Šmicer. [4]

Once again, the Czech Republic failed to qualify for the World Cup, this time finishing second in their 2002 qualification group, behind Denmark, and then being beaten 1–0 in both legs by Belgium in the UEFA play-offs for a place in the finals.

A team settled with Pavel Nedvěd, Jan Koller, Tomáš Rosický, Milan Baroš, Marek Jankulovski, Tomáš Galásek together with the emergence of goalkeeper Petr Čech were unbeaten in 2002 and 2003, scoring 53 goals in 19 games and qualifying for Euro 2004 in the process. The Czech Republic went on a 20-game unbeaten streak, which finally ended in Dublin on 31 March 2004 in a friendly match against the Republic of Ireland. [5] The Czechs entered the Euro finals in Group D, alongside the Netherlands, Germany and Latvia. [6] The team trailed 2–0 to the Netherlands before winning the game 3–2 and beat Germany in the final group match. [7] The Czech Republic beat Denmark in the quarter-final, went into the semi-final against Greece and Tomáš Rosický hit the bar after just two minutes, Jan Koller had shots saved by the Greek goalkeeper and Pavel Nedvěd left the pitch injured in the end of the first half. It was not to be as the 90 minutes finished goalless and Greece won the game in the last minute of the first half of extra-time with a silver goal. [8]

Czech Republic (red) v Ghana (white) at the 2006 World Cup. Closeup Czech Republic versus Ghana at 2006 World Cup.jpg
Czech Republic (red) v Ghana (white) at the 2006 World Cup.

The Czech Republic achieved their record win during the 2006 FIFA World Cup qualification (UEFA), thrashing Andorra 8–1 in a qualification match in Liberec. In the same match, Jan Koller became the all-time top scorer for the national team with his 35th international goal. [9] At the end of the campaign, after finishing in second place in Group 1 then defeating Norway in a playoff, the Czechs qualified for their first FIFA World Cup. [10] The team was boosted prior to the play-off matches by the return of Pavel Nedvěd, [11] who had initially retired from international football after Euro 2004. The squad for the 2006 World Cup in Germany included 18 of the Euro 2004 team which reached the semi-finals. With the team ranked second in the world, [12] they started the tournament with a 3–0 win over the United States. During the game, however, Jan Koller was forced to leave with a hamstring injury, [13] putting him out of the tournament. In the next game, with Koller absent and Milan Baroš still recovering from injury, the team suffered a 2–0 loss to Ghana. [12] Baroš returned for the final game against Italy which the Czechs had to win to progress. The team were reduced to ten men as Jan Polák was dismissed before half-time for two bookable offences. [13] Italy went on to win 2–0. Pavel Nedvěd, Karel Poborský and Vratislav Lokvenc retired from the national team after this tournament. [14]

In the qualifying campaign for Euro 2008, they finished top of their group, above Germany on head-to-head records. The Czech Republic beat co-hosts Switzerland 1–0 in their opening game of the final tournament, before being beaten 3–1 by Portugal, meaning that they and Turkey carried identical records going into the final group game. Although the Czechs took a 2–0 lead just past the hour mark and looked set to qualify, Turkey scored three goals in the final 15 minutes of the game to win the game 3–2. [15]

The Czechs faced World Cup qualification, being drawn in Group 3, under the guidance of coach Petr Rada. They started with a 0–0 away draw against Northern Ireland, before losing to Poland. A late goal from Libor Sionko won the next game 1–0 against Slovenia. This was followed by a win against San Marino, and a goalless draw in Slovenia. In their following match, against neighbours Slovakia, a 2–1 defeat at home left Czech Republic in a precarious qualifying position. Manager Petr Rada was dismissed and six players were suspended. [16] Ivan Hašek took temporary charge as manager, [17] gaining four points from his first two matches, as the team drew away to group leaders Slovakia and thrashed San Marino 7–0 in Uherské Hradiště. They subsequently beat Poland in Prague but followed this result with a goalless draw against Northern Ireland, finishing third in the group and failing to qualify for the World Cup. Hašek announced his immediate resignation. [18]

2010s

A changed team under Michal Bílek entered the Euro 2012 qualifiers and began with a home loss to Lithuania. But a win at home to Scotland was followed by wins against Liechtenstein. Spain defeated Czech Republic in between the Liechtenstein games, but the play-off spot was still in their hands. In the next game, a last minute penalty from Michal Kadlec away to Scotland secured a 2–2 draw. [19] Despite Scotland winning their next two games and the Czechs again being defeated by Spain, the team could finish second if they could beat Lithuania away from home in the final game, assuming Spain would beat Scotland at home. Spain won 3–1 and Czech Republic defeated Lithuania 4–1 to seal second spot and a place in the play-offs. Czech Republic were drawn to face Montenegro in the two-legged play-off. A goal from Václav Pilař and a last minute second from Tomáš Sivok helped the Czechs to a 2–0 first leg lead. In the second leg in Podgorica, a late goal from Petr Jiráček sealed a 1–0 win and the Czechs ran out 3–0 aggregate winners and qualified for Euro 2012.

At the tournament, the Czechs lost their opening game 4–1 to Russia, with their only goal coming from Václav Pilař. In their second match, against Greece, the Czech Republic went 2–0 up within the first six minutes thanks to goals from Petr Jiráček and a second from Pilař. Following the half-time substitution of captain Tomáš Rosický, Greece scored a second-half goal following a mistake from Czech goalkeeper Petr Čech, although there were no more goals and the Czech Republic recorded their first win of the tournament. [20] Going into their third and final group match, the Czech Republic needed at least a draw against co-hosts Poland to advance to the knock-out stage of the tournament. A second-half strike by Jiráček proved the difference between the teams as the Czechs ran out 1–0 winners. Due to Greece beating Russia in the other group game, the Czech Republic subsequently finished top of Group A, [21] becoming the first team to ever win a group at the European Championships with a negative goal difference. [22] The Czech team faced Portugal in the quarter-finals. Portugal eventually made the breakthrough with 11 minutes remaining through a header from Cristiano Ronaldo to win the match 1–0 and eliminate Czech Republic.

Bílek stayed on as coach, despite unrest amongst fans, and was tasked with qualifying for the 2014 World Cup. [23] The Czechs were drawn into UEFA Qualifying Group B along with Italy, Denmark, Bulgaria, Armenia and Malta. The beginning of the campaign was [23] two goalless draws with Denmark and Bulgaria, paired with a narrow win against Malta, capping off their first three games. The team then lost 0–3 to Denmark at home. The team was able to win against Armenia and draw with group leaders Italy, but lost to both Armenia and Italy in the rematches. [23] Bílek resigned [23] after the loss and was replaced with assistant coach Josef Pešice. [24] In their last two games with their new coach, the Czechs recorded wins over Malta and Bulgaria but lost to Italy, leaving them in third place and ending their qualification hopes. Pešice resigned as coach following the conclusion of qualifying.

Pavel Vrba was appointed as the team's new coach on the first day of 2014, ahead of Euro 2016 qualifying. [25] The Czech team was drawn into [26] Group A, along with Netherlands, Turkey, Iceland, Latvia and Kazakhstan. The Czech team began with a win, defeating Netherlands, and followed up with victories over Turkey, Kazakhstan and Iceland, leaving them as group leaders with maximum points after four matches. A draw at home against Latvia followed; nonetheless, Czech Republic remained group leader, and on 6 September 2015, qualified for their sixth European Championship. They only got one point from a draw with Croatia, losing to Spain and Turkey. During a friendly match against Australia on 1 June 2018, the Czechs recorded their biggest defeat losing 0–4 in Sankt Pölten, Austria. [27] It was surpassed during their first qualifier for Euro 2020, as they were beaten 0–5 at Wembley Stadium by England. [28]

Team image

Since 1994, the Czech Republic home kit has primarily been red shirts, with either blue or red shorts. While their away kit has been white shirts with white shorts. Although the team wore blue shorts for a short period between 2010 and 2011. In 2020 the team introduced a new alternate colour as the away kit for the first time. [29]

Stadiums

Ten different cities hosted national team matches of the Czech Republic between 1994 and 2011. [30] The most commonly-used stadium is Generali Arena, the home stadium of AC Sparta Prague. As of 3 June 2014, the team has played 36 of 92 home matches there. Since 2012, competitive games have also been held Doosan Arena, Plzeň.

Stadiums which have hosted Czech Republic international football matches:

Number of
matches
StadiumWDLFirst internationalLatest international
45 Generali Arena, Prague 2671226 April 19958 June 2021
20 Na Stínadlech, Teplice 181118 September 199611 September 2012
13 Sinobo Stadium, Prague 54427 May 200827 March 2021
11 Andrův stadion, Olomouc 70425 March 19987 September 2020
7 Doosan Arena, Plzeň 70012 October 201218 November 2020
5 Bazaly, Ostrava 40125 May 199416 August 2000
4 Stadion u Nisy, Liberec 4004 June 200511 August 2010
3 Stadion Střelnice, Jablonec 3004 September 19965 June 2009
3 Městský stadion, Ostrava 21026 March 199611 October 2016
3 Městský stadion, Uherské Hradiště 10216 August 20066 September 2018
2 Stadion Evžena Rošického, Prague 11024 April 199618 August 2004
2Sportovní areál, Drnovice 20018 August 199915 August 2001
2 Městský stadion, Mladá Boleslav 11031 August 201615 November 2016
1Stadion FC Bohemia Poděbrady, Poděbrady 10026 February 1997
1 Stadion Za Lužánkami, Brno 1008 March 1995
1 Stadion Střelecký ostrov, České Budějovice 10029 March 2011
1 Městský stadion, Ústí nad Labem 10022 March 2017

Results and fixtures

2020

4 September 2020 Nations League Slovakia  Flag of Slovakia.svg1–3Flag of the Czech Republic.svg  Czech Republic Bratislava, Slovakia
20:45  UTC+2
Report
Stadium: Tehelné pole
Attendance: 0 [note 1]
Referee: Andris Treimanis (Latvia)
7 September 2020 Nations League Czech Republic  Flag of the Czech Republic.svg1–2Flag of Scotland.svg  Scotland Olomouc, Czech Republic
20:45  UTC+2
Report
Stadium: Andrův stadion
Attendance: 0 [note 1]
Referee: Serdar Gözübüyük (Netherlands)
7 October 2020 Friendly Cyprus  Flag of Cyprus.svg1–2Flag of the Czech Republic.svg  Czech Republic Larnaca, Cyprus
19:00  UTC+3
Report
Stadium: AEK Arena
Referee: Lionel Tschudi (Switzerland)
11 October 2020 Nations League Israel  Flag of Israel.svg1–2Flag of the Czech Republic.svg  Czech Republic Haifa, Israel
21:45  UTC+3
Report
Stadium: Sammy Ofer Stadium
Referee: Tiago Martins (Portugal)
14 October 2020 Nations League Scotland  Flag of Scotland.svg1–0Flag of the Czech Republic.svg  Czech Republic Glasgow, Scotland
19:45  UTC+1
Report Stadium: Hampden Park
Referee: Felix Zwayer (Germany)
11 November 2020 Friendly Germany  Flag of Germany.svg1–0Flag of the Czech Republic.svg  Czech Republic Leipzig, Germany
20:45  UTC+1 Report Stadium: Red Bull Arena
Attendance: 0
Referee: Andris Treimanis (Latvia)
15 November 2020 Nations League Czech Republic  Flag of the Czech Republic.svg1–0Flag of Israel.svg  Israel Plzeň, Czech Republic
20:45  UTC+1
Report Stadium: Doosan Arena
Referee: Srđan Jovanović (Serbia)
18 November 2020 Nations League Czech Republic  Flag of the Czech Republic.svg2–0Flag of Slovakia.svg  Slovakia Plzeň, Czech Republic
20:45  UTC+1
Report Stadium: Doosan Arena
Referee: Cüneyt Çakır (Turkey)

2021

24 March 2021 2022 World Cup qualification Estonia  Flag of Estonia.svg2–6Flag of the Czech Republic.svg  Czech Republic Lublin, Poland
21:45
Report
Stadium: Arena Lublin
Referee: Anastasios Papapetrou (Greece)
27 March 2021 2022 World Cup qualification Czech Republic  Flag of the Czech Republic.svg1–1Flag of Belgium (civil).svg  Belgium Prague, Czech Republic
20:45
Report
Stadium: Sinobo Stadium
Attendance: 0
Referee: Willie Collum (Scotland)
30 March 2021 2022 World Cup qualification Wales  Flag of Wales (1959-present).svg1–0Flag of the Czech Republic.svg  Czech Republic Cardiff, Wales
19:45
Report Stadium: Cardiff City Stadium
Attendance: 0
Referee: Ovidiu Haţegan (Romania)
4 June 2021 Friendly Italy  Flag of Italy.svg4–0Flag of the Czech Republic.svg  Czech Republic Bologna, Italy
20:45  UTC+2
Report Stadium: Stadio Renato Dall'Ara
Attendance: 0
Referee: Lionel Tschudi (Switzerland)
Note: The match was originally scheduled for 4 June 2020, but was postponed due to the COVID-19 pandemic in Italy.
8 June 2021 Friendly Czech Republic  Flag of the Czech Republic.svg3–1Flag of Albania.svg  Albania Prague, Czech Republic
20:15  UTC+2
Report
Stadium: Stadion Letná
Attendance: 0
Referee: Peter Kralovic (Slovakia)
14 June 2021 Euro 2020 Group D Scotland  Flag of Scotland.svg0–2Flag of the Czech Republic.svg  Czech Republic Glasgow, Scotland
14:00  UTC+1 Report
Stadium: Hampden Park
Attendance: 9,847
Referee: Daniel Siebert (Germany)
18 June 2021 Euro 2020 Group D Croatia  Flag of Croatia.svg1–1Flag of the Czech Republic.svg  Czech Republic Glasgow, Scotland
17:00  UTC+1
Report
Stadium: Hampden Park
Attendance: 5,607
Referee: Carlos del Cerro Grande (Spain)
22 June 2021 Euro 2020 Group D Czech Republic  Flag of the Czech Republic.svg0–1Flag of England.svg  England London, England
20:00  UTC+1 Report
Stadium: Wembley Stadium
Attendance: 19,104
Referee: Artur Soares Dias (Portugal)
27 June 2021 Euro 2020 R16 Netherlands  Flag of the Netherlands.svg0–2Flag of the Czech Republic.svg  Czech Republic Budapest, Hungary
18:00  UTC+2 Report
Stadium: Puskás Aréna
Attendance: 52,834
Referee: Sergei Karasev (Russia)
3 July 2021 Euro 2020 QF Czech Republic  Flag of the Czech Republic.svg1–2Flag of Denmark.svg  Denmark Baku, Azerbaijan
20:00  UTC+4
Report
Stadium: Olympic Stadium
Attendance: 16,306
Referee: Björn Kuipers (Netherlands)
2 September 2021 2022 World Cup qualification Czech Republic  Flag of the Czech Republic.svgvFlag of Belarus.svg  Belarus Czech Republic
20:45 Report
5 September 2021 2022 World Cup qualification Belgium  Flag of Belgium (civil).svgvFlag of the Czech Republic.svg  Czech Republic Belgium
20:45 Report
8 September 2021 Friendly Czech Republic  Flag of the Czech Republic.svgvFlag of Ukraine.svg  Ukraine TBD
8 October 2021 2022 World Cup qualification Czech Republic  Flag of the Czech Republic.svgvFlag of Wales (1959-present).svg  Wales Czech Republic
20:45 Report
16 November 2021 2022 World Cup qualification Czech Republic  Flag of the Czech Republic.svgvFlag of Estonia.svg  Estonia Czech Republic
20:45 Report

Coaching staff

PositionName
Head Coach Flag of the Czech Republic.svg Jaroslav Šilhavý
Assistant Coach Flag of the Czech Republic.svg Tomáš Galásek
Assistant Coach Flag of the Czech Republic.svg Jiří Chytrý
Goalkeeping Coach Flag of the Czech Republic.svg Milan Veselý

Coaching history

Players

Current squad

On 25 May 2021, the following 25 players were called up for the UEFA Euro 2020. [33] Michal Sadílek was announced as the final player in the squad on 27 May, after the confirmation of Ondřej Kúdela's ten-match ban. [34]

On 12 June 2021, Jiří Pavlenka had to be replaced by Tomáš Koubek due to last-minute injury. [35]

No.Pos.PlayerDate of birth (age)CapsGoalsClub
11 GK Tomáš Vaclík (1989-03-29) 29 March 1989 (age 32)420 Flag of Greece.svg Olympiacos
161 GK Aleš Mandous (1992-04-21) 21 April 1992 (age 29)10 Flag of the Czech Republic.svg Sigma Olomouc
231 GK Tomáš Koubek (1992-04-14) 14 April 1992 (age 29)110 Flag of Germany.svg FC Augsburg

22 DF Pavel Kadeřábek (1992-04-25) 25 April 1992 (age 29)483 Flag of Germany.svg 1899 Hoffenheim
32 DF Ondřej Čelůstka (1989-06-18) 18 June 1989 (age 32)313 Flag of the Czech Republic.svg Sparta Prague
42 DF Jakub Brabec (1992-08-06) 6 August 1992 (age 28)221 Flag of the Czech Republic.svg Viktoria Plzeň
52 DF Vladimír Coufal (1992-08-22) 22 August 1992 (age 28)211 Flag of England.svg West Ham United
62 DF Tomáš Kalas (1993-05-15) 15 May 1993 (age 28)282 Flag of England.svg Bristol City
92 DF Tomáš Holeš (1993-03-31) 31 March 1993 (age 28)132 Flag of the Czech Republic.svg Slavia Prague
172 DF David Zima (2000-11-08) 8 November 2000 (age 20)20 Flag of the Czech Republic.svg Slavia Prague
182 DF Jan Bořil (1991-01-11) 11 January 1991 (age 30)270 Flag of the Czech Republic.svg Slavia Prague
222 DF Aleš Matějů (1996-06-03) 3 June 1996 (age 25)40 Flag of Italy.svg Brescia

73 MF Antonín Barák (1994-12-03) 3 December 1994 (age 26)236 Flag of Italy.svg Hellas Verona
83 MF Vladimír Darida (captain) (1990-08-08) 8 August 1990 (age 30)768 Flag of Germany.svg Hertha BSC
123 MF Lukáš Masopust (1993-02-12) 12 February 1993 (age 28)272 Flag of the Czech Republic.svg Slavia Prague
133 MF Petr Ševčík (1994-05-04) 4 May 1994 (age 27)120 Flag of the Czech Republic.svg Slavia Prague
143 MF Jakub Jankto (1996-01-19) 19 January 1996 (age 25)404 Flag of Italy.svg Sampdoria
153 MF Tomáš Souček (1995-02-27) 27 February 1995 (age 26)407 Flag of England.svg West Ham United
213 MF Alex Král (1998-05-19) 19 May 1998 (age 23)222 Flag of Russia.svg Spartak Moscow
253 MF Jakub Pešek (1993-06-24) 24 June 1993 (age 28)21 Flag of the Czech Republic.svg Slovan Liberec
263 MF Michal Sadílek (1999-05-31) 31 May 1999 (age 22)20 Flag of the Czech Republic.svg Slovan Liberec

104 FW Patrik Schick (1996-01-24) 24 January 1996 (age 25)3116 Flag of Germany.svg Bayer Leverkusen
114 FW Michael Krmenčík (1993-03-15) 15 March 1993 (age 28)339 Flag of the Czech Republic.svg Slavia Prague
194 FW Adam Hložek (2002-07-25) 25 July 2002 (age 18)70 Flag of the Czech Republic.svg Sparta Prague
204 FW Matěj Vydra (1992-05-01) 1 May 1992 (age 29)396 Flag of England.svg Burnley
244 FW Tomáš Pekhart (1989-05-26) 26 May 1989 (age 32)232 Flag of Poland.svg Legia Warsaw

Recent call-ups

The following players have also been called up to the Czech Republic squad within the last twelve months:

Pos.PlayerDate of birth (age)CapsGoalsClubLatest call-up
GK Jiří Pavlenka (1992-08-26) 26 August 1992 (age 28)140 Flag of Germany.svg Werder Bremen UEFA Euro 2020 INJ
GK Filip Nguyen (1992-09-14) 14 September 1992 (age 28)00 Flag of the Czech Republic.svg Slovan Liberec v. Flag of Wales (1959-present).svg  Wales , 30 March 2021
GK Ondřej Kolář (1994-10-17) 17 October 1994 (age 26)10 Flag of the Czech Republic.svg Slavia Prague v. Flag of Estonia.svg  Estonia , 24 March 2021 INJ
GK Jakub Markovič (2001-07-13) 13 July 2001 (age 20)00 Flag of the Czech Republic.svg Slavia Prague v. Flag of Scotland.svg  Scotland , 7 September 2020

DF Ondřej Kúdela (1987-03-26) 26 March 1987 (age 34)80 Flag of the Czech Republic.svg Slavia Prague UEFA Euro 2020 PRE
DF Patrizio Stronati (1994-11-17) 17 November 1994 (age 26)00 Flag of the Czech Republic.svg Baník Ostrava v. Flag of Wales (1959-present).svg  Wales , 30 March 2021
DF Václav Jemelka (1995-06-23) 23 June 1995 (age 26)20 Flag of Belgium (civil).svg OH Leuven v. Flag of Estonia.svg  Estonia , 24 March 2021 WD
DF Filip Novák (1990-06-26) 26 June 1990 (age 31)251 Flag of Turkey.svg Fenerbahçe v. Flag of Slovakia.svg  Slovakia , 18 November 2020
DF Roman Hubník (1984-06-06) 6 June 1984 (age 37)303 Flag of the Czech Republic.svg Sigma Olomouc v. Flag of Scotland.svg  Scotland , 7 September 2020 RET
DF Jaroslav Zelený (1992-08-20) 20 August 1992 (age 28)10 Flag of the Czech Republic.svg Jablonec v. Flag of Scotland.svg  Scotland , 7 September 2020
DF Šimon Gabriel (2001-05-28) 28 May 2001 (age 20)00 Flag of the Czech Republic.svg Mladá Boleslav v. Flag of Scotland.svg  Scotland , 7 September 2020
DF Daniel Holzer (1995-08-18) 18 August 1995 (age 25)00 Flag of the Czech Republic.svg Baník Ostrava v. Flag of Scotland.svg  Scotland , 7 September 2020
DF Jan Juroška (1993-03-02) 2 March 1993 (age 28)00 Flag of the Czech Republic.svg Baník Ostrava v. Flag of Scotland.svg  Scotland , 7 September 2020
DF Ondřej Karafiát (1994-12-01) 1 December 1994 (age 26)00 Flag of the Czech Republic.svg Mladá Boleslav v. Flag of Scotland.svg  Scotland , 7 September 2020

MF David Pavelka (1991-05-18) 18 May 1991 (age 30)231 Flag of the Czech Republic.svg Sparta Prague v. Flag of Wales (1959-present).svg  Wales , 30 March 2021
MF Lukáš Provod (1996-10-23) 23 October 1996 (age 24)71 Flag of the Czech Republic.svg Slavia Prague v. Flag of Wales (1959-present).svg  Wales , 30 March 2021
MF Tomáš Malínský (1991-08-25) 25 August 1991 (age 29)10 Flag of the Czech Republic.svg Slavia Prague v. Flag of Wales (1959-present).svg  Wales , 30 March 2021
MF Bořek Dočkal (1988-09-30) 30 September 1988 (age 32)437 Flag of the Czech Republic.svg Sparta Prague v. Flag of Slovakia.svg  Slovakia , 18 November 2020
MF Jan Kopic (1990-06-04) 4 June 1990 (age 31)223 Flag of the Czech Republic.svg Viktoria Plzeň v. Flag of Slovakia.svg  Slovakia , 18 November 2020
MF Václav Černý (1997-10-17) 17 October 1997 (age 23)20 Flag of the Netherlands.svg Twente v. Flag of Slovakia.svg  Slovakia , 18 November 2020
MF Radim Breite (1989-08-10) 10 August 1989 (age 31)10 Flag of the Czech Republic.svg Sigma Olomouc v. Flag of Scotland.svg  Scotland , 7 September 2020
MF Lukáš Budínský (1992-03-27) 27 March 1992 (age 29)10 Flag of the Czech Republic.svg Mladá Boleslav v. Flag of Scotland.svg  Scotland , 7 September 2020
MF Marek Havlík (1995-07-08) 8 July 1995 (age 26)10 Flag of the Czech Republic.svg Slovácko v. Flag of Scotland.svg  Scotland , 7 September 2020
MF Adam Jánoš (1992-07-20) 20 July 1992 (age 29)10 Flag of the Czech Republic.svg Baník Ostrava v. Flag of Scotland.svg  Scotland , 7 September 2020
MF Roman Potočný (1991-04-25) 25 April 1991 (age 30)10 Flag of the Czech Republic.svg Fastav Zlín v. Flag of Scotland.svg  Scotland , 7 September 2020
MF Adam Karabec (2003-07-02) 2 July 2003 (age 18)00 Flag of the Czech Republic.svg Sparta Prague v. Flag of Scotland.svg  Scotland , 7 September 2020
MF Jáchym Šíp (2003-01-22) 22 January 2003 (age 18)00 Flag of the Czech Republic.svg Sigma Olomouc v. Flag of Scotland.svg  Scotland , 7 September 2020
MF Tomáš Solil (2000-02-01) 1 February 2000 (age 21)00 Flag of the Czech Republic.svg Pardubice v. Flag of Scotland.svg  Scotland , 7 September 2020
MF Lukáš Kalvach (1995-07-19) 19 July 1995 (age 26)10 Flag of the Czech Republic.svg Viktoria Plzeň v. Flag of Slovakia.svg  Slovakia , 4 September 2020

FW Zdeněk Ondrášek (1988-12-22) 22 December 1988 (age 32)72 Flag of the Czech Republic.svg Viktoria Plzeň v. Flag of Slovakia.svg  Slovakia , 18 November 2020
FW Stanislav Tecl (1990-09-01) 1 September 1990 (age 30)60 Flag of the Czech Republic.svg Slavia Prague v. Flag of Scotland.svg  Scotland , 7 September 2020
FW Antonín Růsek (1999-03-22) 22 March 1999 (age 22)10 Flag of the Czech Republic.svg Zbrojovka Brno v. Flag of Scotland.svg  Scotland , 7 September 2020

Player statistics

As of 3 July 2021 [36]
Players in bold are still active with Czech Republic.
This list does not include players that won caps for Czechoslovakia.

Most capped players

Petr Cech is the most capped player in the history of Czech Republic with 124 caps Petr Cech National.JPG
Petr Cech is the most capped player in the history of Czech Republic with 124 caps
RankPlayerCapsGoalsCareer
1 Petr Čech 12402002–2016
2 Karel Poborský 11881994–2006
3 Tomáš Rosický 105232000–2016
4 Jaroslav Plašil 10372004–2016
5 Milan Baroš 93412001–2012
6 Jan Koller 91551999–2009
Pavel Nedvěd 91181994–2006
8 Vladimír Šmicer 81271993–2005
9 Tomáš Ujfaluši 7822001–2009
10 Marek Jankulovski 77112000–2009

Top goalscorers

Jan Koller is the top scorer in the history of Czech Republic with 55 goals Koller.jpg
Jan Koller is the top scorer in the history of Czech Republic with 55 goals
RankPlayerGoalsCapsRatioCareer
1 Jan Koller (list)55910.61999–2009
2 Milan Baroš (list)41930.442001–2012
3 Vladimír Šmicer 27810.331993–2005
4 Tomáš Rosický 231050.222000–2016
5 Pavel Kuka 22630.351994–2001
6 Patrik Berger 18440.411994–2001
Pavel Nedvěd 18910.21994–2006
8 Patrik Schick 16310.522016–present
9 Vratislav Lokvenc 14740.191995–2006
10 Tomáš Necid 12440.272008–2016

Competitive record

FIFA World Cup

FIFA World Cup record Qualification record
YearResultPositionPldWDLGFGASquadPldWDLGFGA
as Flag of the Czech Republic.svg  Czechoslovakia as Flag of the Czech Republic.svg  Czechoslovakia
Flag of Uruguay.svg 1930 Did not enterDeclined invitation
Flag of Italy (1861-1946).svg 1934 Runners-up 2nd430196 Squad 110021 1934
Flag of France (1794-1815, 1830-1958).svg 1938 Quarter-finals5th311153 Squad 211071 1938
Flag of Brazil (1889-1960).svg 1950 Did not enterDid not enter
Flag of Switzerland.svg 1954 Group stage14th200207 Squad 431051 1954
Flag of Sweden.svg 1958 Group stage9th411296 Squad 430193 1958
Flag of Chile.svg 1962 Runners-up 2nd631277 Squad 5401207 1962
Flag of England.svg 1966 Did not qualify6312124 1966
Flag of Mexico.svg 1970 Group stage15th300327 Squad 7511167 1970
Flag of Germany.svg 1974 Did not qualify421193 1974
Flag of Argentina.svg 1978 420246 1978
Flag of Spain.svg 1982 Group stage19th302124 Squad 8422156 1982
Flag of Mexico.svg 1986 Did not qualify83231112 1986
Flag of Italy.svg 1990 Quarter-finals6th5302105 Squad 8521133 1990
Flag of the United States.svg 1994 Did not qualify10451219 1994
as Flag of the Czech Republic.svg  Czech Republic as Flag of the Czech Republic.svg  Czech Republic
Flag of France.svg 1998 Did not qualify10514166 1998
Flag of South Korea (1997-2011).svg Flag of Japan.svg 2002 126242010 2002
Flag of Germany.svg 2006 Group stage20th310234 Squad 1411033712 2006
Flag of South Africa.svg 2010 Did not qualify10442176 2010
Flag of Brazil.svg 2014 10433139 2014
Flag of Russia.svg 2018 104331710 2018
Flag of Qatar.svg 2022 To be determinedTo be determined 2022
Flag of Canada (Pantone).svg Flag of Mexico.svg Flag of the United States.svg 2026 2026
TotalRunners-up9/2133125164749137742934264116

UEFA European Championship

UEFA European Championship record Qualifying record
YearResultPositionPldWDLGFGASquadPldWDLGFGA
as Flag of the Czech Republic.svg  Czechoslovakia as Flag of the Czech Republic.svg  Czechoslovakia
Flag of France (1794-1815, 1830-1958).svg 1960 Third place3rd210123 Squad 6411165 1960
Flag of Spain (1945-1977).svg 1964 Did not qualify201123 1964
Flag of Italy.svg 1968 631284 1968
Flag of Belgium (civil).svg 1972 6411114 1972
Flag of Yugoslavia (1946-1992).svg 1976 Champions 1st211053 Squad 8521197 1976
Flag of Italy.svg 1980 Third place3rd412154 Squad 6501174 1980
Flag of France.svg 1984 Did not qualify8341157 1984
Flag of Germany.svg 1988 623175 1988
Flag of Sweden.svg 1992 8503129 1992
as Flag of the Czech Republic.svg  Czech Republic as Flag of the Czech Republic.svg  Czech Republic
Flag of England.svg 1996 Runners-up 2nd622278 Squad 10631216 1996
Flag of Belgium (civil).svg Flag of the Netherlands.svg 2000 Group stage10th310233 Squad 101000265 2000
Flag of Portugal.svg 2004 Semi-finals3rd5401105 Squad 8710235 2004
Flag of Austria.svg Flag of Switzerland.svg 2008 Group stage11th310246 Squad 12921275 2008
Flag of Poland.svg Flag of Ukraine.svg 2012 Quarter-finals6th420246 Squad 10613158 2012
Flag of France.svg 2016 Group stage21st301225 Squad 107121914 2016
Flag of Europe.svg 2020 Quarter-finals6th521264 Squad 85031311 2020
Flag of Germany.svg 2024 To be determinedTo be determined 2024
Total1 Title10/1637157154847124812122251102

UEFA Nations League

UEFA Nations League record
SeasonDivisionGroupPosPldWDLGFGAP/RRK
Flag of Portugal.svg 2018–19 B 1 2nd420244Equals-sign-blue.gif20th
Flag of Italy.svg 2020–21 B 2 1st640295Green Arrow Up Darker.svg19th
Flag of None.svg 2022–23 A To be determined
Total1060413919th

FIFA Confederations Cup

FIFA Confederations Cup record
YearResultPositionPldWDLGFGASquad
Flag of Saudi Arabia.svg 1992 Did not qualify
Flag of Saudi Arabia.svg 1995
Flag of Saudi Arabia.svg 1997 Third place3rd5212107 Squad
Flag of Mexico.svg 1999 Did not qualify
Flag of South Korea (1997-2011).svg Flag of Japan.svg 2001
Flag of France.svg 2003
Flag of Germany.svg 2005
Flag of South Africa.svg 2009
Flag of Brazil.svg 2013
Flag of Russia.svg 2017
TotalThird place1/105212107

Head-to-head record (since 1994)

As of 3 July 2021 after the match against Flag of Denmark.svg  Denmark . [37]

  Positive Record  Neutral Record  Negative Record

  1. Includes matches against Flag of Serbia and Montenegro (1992-2006).svg  Serbia and Montenegro .

See also

Notes

  1. 1 2 Due to the COVID-19 pandemic in Europe, all matches scheduled for September 2020 were played behind closed doors. [31] [32]

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