Czechoslovakia national football team

Last updated
Czechoslovakia
1920–1992
Czechoslovakian FA Logo.svg
Association Czechoslovak Football Association
Most caps Zdeněk Nehoda (91)
Top scorer Antonín Puč (34)
Home stadiumVarious
FIFA code TCH
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First colours
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Second colours
First international
Flag of the Czech Republic.svg  Czechoslovakia 7–0 Yugoslavia  Flag of Yugoslavia (1918-1943).svg
(Antwerp, Belgium; 28 August 1920)
Last international
Flag of Belgium (civil).svg  Belgium 0–0 Czechoslovakia  Flag of the Czech Republic.svg
(Brussels, Belgium; 17 November 1993)
Biggest win
Flag of the Czech Republic.svg  Czechoslovakia 7–0 Yugoslavia  Flag of Yugoslavia (1918-1943).svg
(Antwerp, Belgium; 28 August 1920)
Flag of the Czech Republic.svg  Czechoslovakia 7–0 Yugoslavia  Flag of Yugoslavia (1918-1943).svg
(Prague, Czechoslovakia; 28 October 1925)
Biggest defeat
Flag of Hungary (1915-1918, 1919-1946).svg  Hungary 8–3 Czechoslovakia  Flag of the Czech Republic.svg
(Budapest, Hungary; 19 September 1937)
Flag of Scotland.svg  Scotland 5–0 Czechoslovakia  Flag of the Czech Republic.svg
(Glasgow, Scotland; 8 December 1937)
Flag of Hungary (1949-1956; 1-2 aspect ratio).svg  Hungary 5–0 Czechoslovakia  Flag of the Czech Republic.svg
(Hungary; 30 April 1950)
Flag of Hungary (1949-1956; 1-2 aspect ratio).svg  Hungary 5–0 Czechoslovakia  Flag of the Czech Republic.svg
(Hungary; 19 October 1952)
Flag of Austria.svg  Austria 5–0 Czechoslovakia  Flag of the Czech Republic.svg
(Zürich, Switzerland; 19 June 1954)
World Cup
Appearances8 (first in 1934 )
Best resultRunners-up (1934, 1962)
European Championship
Appearances3 (first in 1960 )
Best resultChampions (1976)

The Czechoslovakia national football team (Czech : Československá fotbalová reprezentace, Slovak : Československé národné futbalové mužstvo) was the national football team of Czechoslovakia from 1920 to 1992. The team was controlled by the Czechoslovak Football Association, and the team qualified for eight World Cups and three European Championships. It had two runner-up finishes in World Cups, in 1934 and 1962, and won the European Championship in the 1976 tournament.

Contents

At the time of the dissolution of Czechoslovakia at the end of 1992, the team was participating in UEFA qualifying Group 4 for the 1994 World Cup; it completed this campaign under the name Representation of Czechs and Slovaks (RCS, Czech : Reprezentace Čechů a Slováků, Slovak : Reprezentácia Čechov a Slovákov) before it was disbanded. The present-day Czech Republic national football team is recognized as the successor of the Czechoslovakia team. [1] [2] The country of Slovakia is represented by the Slovak national team.

History

Bohemia

While part of the Austro-Hungarian Empire, Bohemia played its first international on 5 April 1903, a 21 loss for Hungary in Budapest. On 7 October, Hungary came to Prague for a 44 draw. The two countries played three more matches up to 1908 including Bohemia's only victory and Bohemia played its last match on 13 June 1908, losing 40 at home to England. [3]

Inter-war

After World War I, an independent Czechoslovakia entered its football team for the 1920 Olympic event in Antwerp, opening with a 70 win over Yugoslavia on 28 August. They then beat Norway 40 the next day in the quarter-finals and France 41 in the semi-finals on the 31st. However, in the final against Belgium on 2 September, the Czechoslovaks left the field 20 down after 40 minutes in protest with the English referee John Lewis, and were not given a medal. [4]

Czechoslovakia returned for the 1924 Olympics in Paris and defeated Turkey 52 in the first round, but were eliminated in the second 10 against Switzerland in a replay after a 11 draw. [3]

The nation entered the World Cup for the first time in 1934, and won its qualifier against Poland after its neighbour withdrew following a 21 Czechoslovak win in the first leg. At the finals in Italy, Czechoslovakia advanced past Romania, Switzerland and Germany to reach the final, where it lost 21 to the host country after extra time. Oldřich Nejedlý won the Golden Shoe with five goals in the tournament. [5]

Czechoslovakia qualified for the 1938 FIFA World Cup in France with a 71 aggregate victory over Bulgaria, and reached the quarter-finals with a 30 win over the Netherlands in Le Havre. In the quarter-final against Brazil, known as the Battle of Bordeaux for its rough play, Czechoslovakia lost the replay 21. [6]

In 1939, under the German occupation name of "Bohemia", the team played three matches, defeating Yugoslavia 73 and drawing with both Ostmark (occupied Austria) and Germany itself. [3]

Post-World War II

Josef Masopust won the Ballon d'Or for his performance in the Czechoslovakia side which reached the 1962 FIFA World Cup Final Josef Masopust (2011).jpg
Josef Masopust won the Ballon d'Or for his performance in the Czechoslovakia side which reached the 1962 FIFA World Cup Final

After an absence from the 1950 qualification campaign, Czechoslovakia qualified for 1954 by topping its qualifying group unbeaten against Bulgaria and Romania with three wins and a draw. However, in the finals in Switzerland, it was eliminated from a strong group after defeats to Uruguay and Austria. [3]

It also topped its qualifying group for the 1958 FIFA World Cup in Sweden, ahead of Wales and East Germany. They opened their finals campaign on 8 June with a 10 defeat to Northern Ireland in Halmstad, followed by a 22 draw with reigning champions West Germany and a 61 win over Argentina. On 17 June, Czechoslovakia lost a play-off to advance into the knockout stages 21 to Northern Ireland in Malmö. [3]

On 5 April 1959, Czechoslovakia played the first ever qualifying match in a UEFA European Championship, losing 20 away to the Republic of Ireland but eventually advancing 42 on aggregate. Subsequent victories over Denmark (73 aggregate) and Romania (50 aggregate) put the country into the four-team finals in France. It lost 30 to the Soviet Union in the semi-final but gained third place with a 20 win over the hosts at the Stade Velodrome in Marseille. [7]

Czechoslovakia qualified for the 1962 FIFA World Cup in Chile by defeating Scotland 42 after extra time in a play-off in Brussels, Belgium, after finishing level in their qualifying group. In the group at the finals, Czechoslovakia opened with a 10 win over Spain from a Jozef Štibrányi goal, and then drew 00 with holders Brazil. In the last group game on 7 June, Václav Mašek put Czechoslovakia ahead against Mexico in 12 seconds; the team lost 31 but advanced nonetheless. [8]

After goalkeeper Viliam Schrojf's performance, a goal from Adolf Scherer in Rancagua was enough to beat Hungary in the quarter-final, and two more late goals by him against Yugoslavia put Czechoslovakia into their second World Cup final. In the final at the Estadio Nacional de Chile in Santiago, Josef Masopust put Czechoslovakia ahead after 15 minutes by finishing Scherer's pass, but Brazil soon equalised and exploited Schrojf's errors to win 31. Masopust's inspiration was awarded with the 1962 Ballon d'Or. [9]

Czechoslovakia v Santos FC friendly match in Chile, 1965 Santos vs czechoslovakia goal coutinho.jpg
Czechoslovakia v Santos FC friendly match in Chile, 1965

Czechoslovakia did not go to the 1966 FIFA World Cup, with Portugal topping their qualifying group, nor did they qualify for the European Championships of 1964 and 1968. On 3 December 1969 they defeated Hungary 41 in Marseille in a play-off to reach the 1970 FIFA World Cup in Mexico, having finished joint top of their qualifying group. Czechoslovakia lost all three of their matches in the 1970 World Cup, in a group featuring holders England and eventual winners Brazil. [3]

After missing out on the 1972 European Championship and the 1974 World Cup, Czechoslovakia reached the 1976 European Championship in Yugoslavia, topping a group featuring England, Portugal and Cyprus and then defeating the Soviet Union 42 in a play-off. In the semi-final in Zagreb, they advanced after beating the Netherlands 31 after extra time. In the final on 20 June at Crvena Zvezda Stadium in Belgrade, Czechoslovakia led 20 before the game went to penalties at a 22 draw. Antonin Panenka scored the winning penalty with a chip, [10] subsequently referred to by his name when executed by other players. [11]

Czechoslovakia did not qualify for the 1978 FIFA World Cup, as Scotland won their group. [12] The country did qualify for Euro 1980, and by coming second in its group behind West Germany faced the hosts Italy in a third-place play-off, which it won on sudden-death penalties at the Stadio San Paolo in Naples. [13] At the 1982 FIFA World Cup in Spain, Czechoslovakia was eliminated in the group stage after draws with Kuwait and France and losing 20 to England. The country's last major tournament was the 1990 FIFA World Cup in Italy, where in the group it opened with a 51 win over the United States before defeating Austria with a Michal Bilek penalty, enough to advance despite losing 20 to the hosts at the Stadio Olimpico. In the last 16 at the Stadio San Nicola in Bari, a hat-trick from Tomáš Skuhravý featured in a 41 in over Costa Rica. Czechoslovakia was eliminated on 1 July in a quarter-final at the San Siro, losing 10 from a Lothar Matthäus penalty against eventual winners West Germany. Later that month, manager Dr Jozef Venglos who had led Czechoslovakia in the tournament was appointed as the first foreign manager in English football, at Aston Villa. [14]

Kit history

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1934–1976
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1950–1967 (away)
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1980–1989
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1990 Home
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1990 Away
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1992–93 Away

Competitive record

FIFA World Cup

FIFA World Cup record Qualification record
YearResultPositionPldWDLGFGASquadPldWDLGFGA
Flag of Uruguay.svg 1930 Did not enterDeclined invitation
Flag of Italy (1861-1946).svg 1934 Runners-up 2nd430196 Squad 110021 1934
Flag of France (1794-1815, 1830-1958).svg 1938 Quarter-finals5th311153 Squad 211071 1938
Flag of Brazil (1889-1960).svg 1950 Did not enterDid not enter
Flag of Switzerland.svg 1954 Group stage14th200207 Squad 431051 1954
Flag of Sweden.svg 1958 Group stage9th411296 Squad 430193 1958
Flag of Chile.svg 1962 Runners-up 2nd631277 Squad 5401207 1962
Flag of England.svg 1966 Did not qualify6312124 1966
Flag of Mexico.svg 1970 Group stage15th300327 Squad 7511167 1970
Flag of Germany.svg 1974 Did not qualify421193 1974
Flag of Argentina.svg 1978 420246 1978
Flag of Spain.svg 1982 Group stage19th302124 Squad 8422156 1982
Flag of Mexico.svg 1986 Did not qualify83231112 1986
Flag of Italy.svg 1990 Quarter-finals6th5302105 Squad 8521133 1990
Flag of the United States.svg 1994 Did not qualify10451219 1994
TotalRunners-up8/15301151444457140161514463

UEFA European Championship

UEFA European Championship record Qualifying record
YearResultPositionPldWDLGFGASquadPldWDLGFGA
Flag of France (1794-1815, 1830-1958).svg 1960 Third place3rd210123 Squad 6411165 1960
Flag of Spain (1945-1977).svg 1964 Did not qualify201123 1964
Flag of Italy.svg 1968 631284 1968
Flag of Belgium (civil).svg 1972 6411114 1972
Flag of Yugoslavia (1946-1992).svg 1976 Champions 1st211053 Squad 8521197 1976
Flag of Italy.svg 1980 Third place3rd412154 Squad 6501174 1980
Flag of France.svg 1984 Did not qualify8341157 1984
Flag of Germany.svg 1988 623175 1988
Flag of Sweden.svg 1992 8503129 1992
Total1 Title3/9833212105631131210748

Olympic Games

Olympic Games record
YearResultPositionPldWDLGFGASquad
Flag of the United Kingdom.svg 1908 Did not enter
Flag of Sweden.svg 1912
Flag of Belgium (civil).svg 1920 Disqualified4301153 Squad
Flag of France (1794-1815, 1830-1958).svg 1924 Second round9th311164 Squad
Flag of the Netherlands.svg 1928 Did not enter
Flag of Germany (1935-1945).svg 1936
Flag of the United Kingdom.svg 1948
Flag of Finland.svg 1952
Flag of Australia (converted).svg 1956
Flag of Italy.svg 1960 Did not qualify
Flag of Japan (1870-1999).svg 1964 Silver medal2nd6501195 Squad
Flag of Mexico.svg 1968 Group stage9th3111103 Squad
Flag of Germany.svg 1972 Did not enter
Flag of Canada (Pantone).svg 1976
Flag of the Soviet Union.svg 1980 Gold medal1st6420101 Squad
Flag of the United States.svg 1984 Did not enter
Flag of South Korea (1984-1997).svg 1988 Did not qualify
Total1 Gold medal5/172214446016

Player records

Zdenek Nehoda Zdenek Nehoda (2012).JPG
Zdeněk Nehoda
Most capped players [15]
# Player Caps Goals Career
1. Zdeněk Nehoda 90 31 1971–1987
2. Marián Masný 75 18 1974–1982
Ladislav Novák 75 1 1952–1966
4. František Plánička 73 0 1926–1938
5. Karol Dobiaš 67 6 1967–1980
6. Josef Masopust 63 10 1954–1966
Ivo Viktor 63 0 1966–1977
8. Ján Popluhár 62 1 1958–1967
9. Antonín Puč 60 34 1926–1938
10. Antonín Panenka 59 17 1973–1982
Oldrich Nejedly, 1934 FIFA World Cup top scorer Nejedly.JPG
Oldřich Nejedlý, 1934 FIFA World Cup top scorer
Top goalscorers [15]
# Player Goals Caps Ratio Career
1. Antonín Puč 34 60 0.571926–1938
2. Zdeněk Nehoda 31 90 0.341971–1987
3. Oldřich Nejedlý 28 43 0.651931–1938
Josef Silný 28 50 0.561925–1934
5. Adolf Scherer 22 36 0.611958–1964
František Svoboda 22 43 0.511927–1937
7. Marián Masný 18 75 0.241974–1982
8. Antonín Panenka 17 59 0.291973–1982
9. Jozef Adamec 14 44 0.321960–1971
Tomáš Skuhravý [lower-alpha 1] 14 43 0.331985–1993

Head to head record (1908–1994)

Honours

CompetitionGold medal icon.svgSilver medal icon.svgBronze medal icon.svgTotal
World Cup 0202
European Championship 1124
Olympic Games 1102
Total2327
This is a list of honours for the senior Czechoslovakia national team
  • Gold medal (1): 1980
  • Silver medal (1): 1964

Minor Tournaments

See also

Notes

  1. Tomáš Skuhravý also played for Representation of Czechs and Slovaks during the 1994 FIFA World Cup qualification and then the Czech Republic national football team until 1995, for whom he scored three further goals.

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In association football, the Panenka is a technique used while taking a penalty kick in which the taker, instead of kicking the ball to the left or right of the goalkeeper, gives a light touch underneath the ball, causing it to rise and fall within the centre of the goal, deceiving the goalkeeper who is counted on by the taker to have guessed a side and committed a dive away from the centre. It was first believed to have been used by Czech player Antonín Panenka, who introduced this technique to the world in the 1976 UEFA European Championship final, when he beat West German goalkeeper Sepp Maier to claim the title for the Czechoslovakian national team. However it is now believed to have been pioneered by Manchester City and Wales forward Billy Meredith 70 years earlier. After its sensational debut in the tournament, the Panenka kick has been used on rare occasions and mostly by highly respected players who can deal with the consequences of missing such an attempt. This style of penalty kick is also called Il cucchiaio in the Italian-speaking world, cavadinha in Brazil and penal picado in Argentina and elsewhere in South America.

References

  1. "Member Association – Czech Republic". FIFA.com. Retrieved 14 March 2016.
  2. "UEFA EURO 2016 – Czech Republic profile". UEFA.com. Retrieved 14 March 2016.
  3. 1 2 3 4 5 6 "Czech Republic national football team". European Football. Retrieved 10 July 2014.
  4. Murray, Scott (20 July 2012). "The Joy of Six: Olympic football tournament stories". The Guardian . Retrieved 10 July 2014.
  5. "Delight for the Azzurri as home advantage tells". FIFA . Retrieved 10 July 2014.
  6. "World Cup History - On this day: Battle of Bordeaux". Eurosport. 12 June 2010. Retrieved 10 July 2014.
  7. Rostance, Tom (21 May 2012). "Euro 1960: Lev Yashin leads Soviets to glory in France". BBC Sport . Retrieved 10 July 2014.
  8. "The 11 fastest goals in World Cup history". Eurosport . Retrieved 10 July 2014.
  9. "Brazil flying high with 'Little Bird' Garrincha". FIFA . Retrieved 10 July 2014.
  10. "Panenka reflects on perfect penalty at EURO '76". UEFA . Retrieved 10 July 2014.
  11. Pascoe, Thomas (25 June 2012). "Euro 2012: The best and worst 'Panenka' penalties". The Daily Telegraph . Retrieved 10 July 2014.
  12. "World Cup 1978 Qualifying". RSSSF . Retrieved 11 July 2014.
  13. "UEFA Euro 1980 matches". UEFA . Retrieved 11 July 2014.
  14. Kendrick, Mat (7 September 2010). "Feature: How Dr Josef Venglos was a pioneer at Aston Villa". Birmingham Mail . Retrieved 11 July 2014.
  15. 1 2 Mamrud, Roberto. "Czechoslovakia/Czech Republic - Record International Players". RSSSF.
Preceded by
1972 West Germany  Flag of Germany.svg
European Champions
1976 (First title)
Succeeded by
1980 West Germany  Flag of Germany.svg