D. Ross Lederman

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D. Ross Lederman
Born
David Ross Lederman

(1894-12-12)December 12, 1894
Lancaster, Pennsylvania, United States
DiedAugust 24, 1972(1972-08-24) (aged 77)
Hollywood, California, US
OccupationFilm director, producer, writer
Years active1925–1960
Spouse(s)June Lederman

David Ross Lederman (December 12, 1894 August 24, 1972) was an American film director noted for his Western/action/adventure films of the 1930s and 1940s.

Contents

Starting out as an extra in Mack Sennett's Keystone Cops series, Lederman worked his way through the ranks of film production, and first made his mark as a second-unit director. He directed several B-Western serials in the early 1930s, such as Two-Fisted Law and Texas Cyclone both 1932, in which he worked with Tim McCoy and a young John Wayne. Becoming a full feature director in the late 1930s, Lederman specialized in action films and especially westerns, continuing to produce films with McCoy at Columbia Pictures.

Style

By most accounts Lederman was regarded as a somewhat brusque man with an aversion to retakes and prima donna behavior and he clashed with McCoy on more than one occasion. He was renowned for his strict filming regimen and for bringing in films on time and under budget, which could only have helped to ensure his constant employment as a director, but was often criticised by critics in that several of his films looked rushed. Lederman's films have been described as having a "dystopian view of life" and a "relentless, inexorable narrative drive". [1]

In the 1950s Lederman, like many of his "B" picture colleagues, concentrated on series television, and directed many episodes of Annie Oakley (1954), Buffalo Bill, Jr. and Range Rider , among others. He retired in the early 1960s.

He was married from the mid-'40s through the mid-'50s to June Lederman and was stepfather to her son Rusty, born about 1943. Lederman died in 1972.

Filmography

Films

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References

  1. Dixon, Wheeler Winston. "A Cinema of Violence: The Films of D. Ross Lederman". Film Criticism. 30 (3 (Spring, 2006)): 38–65 via JSTOR.