Dan Edwards

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Dan Edwards
Dan Edwards - 1952 Bowman large.jpg
Edwards on a 1952 Bowman football card
Born:(1926-08-17)August 17, 1926
Osage, Texas
Died:August 7, 2001(2001-08-07) (aged 74)
Gatesville, Texas
Career information
CFL status American
Position(s) End
Height6 ft 1 in (185 cm)
Weight197 lb (89 kg)
College Georgia
NFL draft 1948 / Round: 1 / Pick: 9th
Career history
As coach
1958 BC Lions
1959–1961 Edmonton Eskimos (line)
As player
1948 Brooklyn Dodgers (AAFC)
1949 Chicago Hornets
1950–1951 New York Yanks
1952 Dallas Texans
1953–1954 Baltimore Colts
1955–1957 BC Lions
RecordsNFL record for shortest kick off return for a touchdown (17 yards)

Daniel Moody Edwards (August 17, 1926 – August 7, 2001) was an American gridiron football player and coach. He played professional as an end in the All-America Football Conference (AAFC), the Canadian Football League (CFL), and the National Football League (NFL).

Biography

Edwards played college football at Georgia. Drafted by the Pittsburgh Steelers in the 1st round (9th overall) of the 1948 NFL Draft, Edwards played for the AAFC's Brooklyn Dodgers (1948) and Chicago Hornets (1949) and the NFL's New York Yanks (1950–1951), Dallas Texans (1952) and Baltimore Colts (1953–1954). In 1950, he was selected for the Pro Bowl and First-Team All-Pro. He holds the record for the shortest kick off return for a touchdown, 17 yards, set on October 17, 1949. [ citation needed ]

Following his playing career, Edwards spent four seasons as a coach with the BC Lions and Edmonton Eskimos before leaving football to become an oil executive. [1]

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References

  1. Hunter, Gorde (May 19, 1962). "One Man's Opinions". The Calgary Herald. Retrieved May 1, 2011.