Dan Robinson (American football)

Last updated
Dan Robinson
Biographical details
Born (1926-07-17) July 17, 1926 (age 94)
Playing career
1946–1949 Western Carolina
Position(s) Tackle
Coaching career (HC unless noted)
1950 Western Carolina (freshman)
1951 Greenwood HS (SC)
1952–1955 Morganton HS (SC)
1956–1968 Western Carolina
Head coaching record
Overall51–67–6 (college)

Dan Robinson (born July 17, 1926) is a former American football coach. He served as the head football coach at Western Carolina University from 1956 to 1968, compiling a record of 51–67–6. Robinson played college football as a tackle at Western Carolina from 1946 to 1949. [1] [2]

Contents

Head coaching record

College

YearTeamOverallConferenceStandingBowl/playoffs
Western Carolina Catamounts (North State Conference / Carolinas Conference)(1956–1968)
1956 Western Carolina1–90–57th
1957 Western Carolina2–5–12–2–14th
1958 Western Carolina1–8–11–4–16th
1959 Western Carolina7–2–14–23rd
1960 Western Carolina6–52–4T–4th
1961 Western Carolina4–62–57th
1962 Western Carolina3–5–11–4–1T–5th
1963 Western Carolina2–6–11–56th
1964 Western Carolina5–44–22nd
1965 Western Carolina7–25–23rd
1966 Western Carolina5–53–46th
1967 Western Carolina4–5–12–4–1T–6th
1968 Western Carolina4–53–3T–3rd
Western Carolina:51–67–630–46–4
Total:51–67–6

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References

  1. "Dan Robinson Resigns Post in Morganton". The Gastonia Gazette . Gastonia, North Carolina. November 19, 1955. p. 4. Retrieved July 27, 2019 via Newspapers.com Open Access logo PLoS transparent.svg .
  2. Glance, Bill (January 11, 1956). "Dan Robinson Named Head Grid Coach Of Catamounts". Asheville Citizen-Times . Asheville, North Carolina. p. 13. Retrieved July 27, 2019 via Newspapers.com Open Access logo PLoS transparent.svg .