Dana M. King

Last updated
Dana M. King
Biographical details
Born1890
DiedApril 19, 1952 (aged 62)
Glenford, Ohio
Playing career
Football
c. 1915 Ohio
Baseball
c. 1915 Ohio
Position(s) End (football)
Coaching career (HC unless noted)
Football
1917 Hamilton HS (OH)
1919–1929 Hamilton HS (OH)
1930 Cincinnati (assistant)
1931–1934 Cincinnati
1939–1941 Cincinnati Bengals
1943–1945 Hamilton HS (OH)
Basketball
1917–1929 Hamilton HS (OH)
Baseball
1936 Cincinnati
Administrative career (AD unless noted)
1932–1936 Cincinnati
Head coaching record
Overall25–10–1 (college football)
5–9 (college baseball)
8–14–2 (pro football)
Accomplishments and honors
Championships
Football
2 Buckeye (1933–1934)

Dana M. King (1890 – April 19, 1952) was an American football and baseball coach. He served as the head football coach at the University of Cincinnati from 1931 to 1934, compiling a record of 25–10–1.

Contents

Early life and education

King graduated from Ohio University in 1917. He played football for the Bobcats as an end.

Coaching career

Hamilton High School

King served as football coach at Hamilton High School. [1] He coached 16 seasons (1917, 1919–1929 and 1943–1945), going 104–26–8, with his only losing season being in 1917 (3–5–1). From 1926 to 1929, his team went 35–2–1 with a 10–0 season in 1929 in which they scored 332 points while allowing only 19. From 1928 to 1930, his team had an 18-game winning streak. His teams used single-wing and double-wing offenses for most of his career before going to a T-formation attack in his term in the 1940s. He also served time as coach for baseball, track, and basketball. For basketball, he coached from 1917 to 1929, with an 18–0 team in 1926–27 before losing in the District Tournament finals. He went 148–59 as coach. In the 1920s, he served as city recreation director, along with overseeing development of the playground system in the city. He also helped establish softball leagues and coached a local American Legion football team.

University of Cincinnati

King joined the University of Cincinnati as an assistant football coach in 1930. He became coach the next year, along with athletic director in 1932. In his four seasons as coach, he went 25–10–1, with two conference titles. He stepped down as coach in 1934, although he stayed on as athletic director until 1936. [2]

Cincinnati Bengals

In 1939, King became coach of the original Cincinnati Bengals. They went 6–2 in 1939, good for second in the American Professional Football Association. They joined the American Football League in 1940. They went 1–7 in 1940 and 1–5–2 in 1941 before disbanding after World War II shuttled the league and the team.

Return to Hamilton High School

King returned to Hamilton High School in 1942 to serve as head football coach and athletic director. He left coaching after 1945 due to ill health.

Later life and death

After the 1946–47 school year, he retired as a math teacher. He was inducted into the Butler County Sports and Hamilton School Athletic Halls of Fame. King died on April 19, 1952, at his home in Glenford, Ohio. [3]

Head coaching record

College football

YearTeamOverallConferenceStandingBowl/playoffs
Cincinnati Bearcats (Buckeye Athletic Association)(1931–1934)
1931 Cincinnati 5–42–1T–3rd
1932 Cincinnati 7–22–2T–3rd
1933 Cincinnati 7–23–1T–1st
1934 Cincinnati 6–2–13–0–11st
Cincinnati:25–10–110–4–1
Total:25–10–1
      National championship        Conference title        Conference division title or championship game berth

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References

  1. Hamilton Daily News, Oct 3, 1922
  2. https://sites.google.com/a/lanepl.org/jbcols/2001/november
  3. "Death Summons Dana M. King". The Times Recorder. Zanesville, Ohio. April 19, 1952. p. 2. Retrieved November 1, 2018 via Newspapers.com Open Access logo PLoS transparent.svg .