Dandy Dick (film)

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Dandy Dick
DandyDick.jpg
Directed by William Beaudine
Written by
Produced by Walter C. Mycroft
Starring Will Hay
Nancy Burne
Cinematography Jack Parker
Distributed by Wardour Films
Release date
March 1935 (UK)
Running time
70 min
CountryUnited Kingdom
LanguageEnglish

Dandy Dick is a 1935 British comedy film starring Will Hay. It was based on the 1887 play Dandy Dick by Arthur Wing Pinero. It is the second and last of his films to be based on a play by Arthur Wing Pinero the first was Those Were the Days which was based on The Magistrate . Moore Marriott, who played an uncredited role in the film, later became a famous foil to Hay in films later on alongside Graham Moffatt, it was during the film of Dandy Dick that Marriott introduced the idea of being a supporting player to Hay.

Contents

Plot

A vicar who lives in the country with his daughter and grandson discovers he owns a share in a racehorse. He must now put his principles aside and attempt to save the church by gambling. A doping scandal ensues.

Partial Cast


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Dandy Dick may refer to: