Daniel Hiester

Last updated

  1. Hess, Stephen. America's Political Dynasties , pp. 158-159, 659. London and New York: Routledge, 2017.
  2. "Congress slaveowners", The Washington Post, January 19, 2022, retrieved July 11, 2022
  3. James H. Peeling (1960). "Hiester, Daniel". Dictionary of American Biography . New York: Charles Scribner's Sons.

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References

Daniel Hiester
Member of the U.S.HouseofRepresentatives
from Maryland's 4th district
In office
March 4, 1801 March 7, 1804
Political offices
Preceded by
position created
Member, Supreme Executive Council of Pennsylvania,
representing Montgomery County

October 15, 1784 – October 24, 1785
Succeeded by
U.S. House of Representatives
Preceded by
District Created
Member of the  U.S. House of Representatives
from Pennsylvania's at-large congressional district

1789–1791
alongside: George Clymer, Thomas Fitzsimons, Thomas Hartley, Thomas Scott, Henry Wynkoop, Frederick A.C. Muhlenberg and Peter G. Muhlenberg

1791–1793
alongside: Thomas Fitzsimons, Thomas Hartley, Israel Jacobs, John W. Kittera, Frederick A.C. Muhlenberg, William Findley, and Andrew Gregg
1793–1795
alongside: Thomas Fitzsimons, John W. Kittera, Thomas Hartley, Thomas Scott, James Armstrong, Peter G. Muhlenberg, Andrew Gregg, Frederick A.C. Muhlenberg, William Irvine, William Findley, John Smilie, and William Montgomery

Succeeded by
Preceded by Member of the  U.S. House of Representatives
from Pennsylvania's 5th congressional district

1795–1796
Succeeded by
Preceded by Member of the  U.S. House of Representatives
from Maryland's 4th congressional district

1801–1804
Succeeded by