Daniel L. Fapp

Last updated
Daniel L. Fapp, A.S.C.
Born(1904-04-21)April 21, 1904
Kansas City, Kansas, United States
DiedJuly 19, 1986(1986-07-19) (aged 82)
Occupation Cinematographer
Years active1921-1969

Daniel L. Fapp, A.S.C. (April 21, 1904 – July 19, 1986) was an American cinematographer, best known as director of photography for West Side Story (1961), for which he won an Academy Award for Best Cinematography, and The Great Escape (1963). He also was nominated for Academy Awards for his cinematography for Desire Under the Elms (1958), The Five Pennies (1959), One, Two, Three (1961), The Unsinkable Molly Brown (1964), Ice Station Zebra (1968) and Marooned (1969).

<i>West Side Story</i> (1961 film) 1961 film by Robert Wise, Jerome Robbins

West Side Story is a 1961 American romantic musical drama film directed by Robert Wise and Jerome Robbins. The film is an adaptation of the 1957 Broadway musical of the same name, which in turn was inspired by William Shakespeare's play Romeo and Juliet. It stars Natalie Wood, Richard Beymer, Russ Tamblyn, Rita Moreno, and George Chakiris, and was photographed by Daniel L. Fapp in Super Panavision 70. Released on October 18, 1961, through United Artists, the film received high praise from critics and viewers, and became the second highest grossing film of the year in the United States. The film was nominated for 11 Academy Awards and won ten, including Best Picture, becoming the record holder for the most wins for a musical.

The Academy Award for Best Cinematography is an Academy Award awarded each year to a cinematographer for work on one particular motion picture.

<i>The Great Escape</i> (film) 1963 American film directed by John Sturges

The Great Escape is a 1963 American epic war film starring Steve McQueen, James Garner and Richard Attenborough, and featuring James Donald, Charles Bronson, Donald Pleasence, James Coburn, and Hannes Messemer. It was filmed in Panavision.

Contents

Life

Fapp was born in Kansas City, Kansas.

He died in Laguna Niguel, California at the age of 82.

Laguna Niguel, California City in California, United States

Laguna Niguel is a suburban city in Orange County, California in the United States. The name Laguna Niguel is derived from the words "Laguna" and "Niguili". As of the 2010 census, the population was 62,979. Laguna Niguel is located in the San Joaquin Hills in the southeastern corner of Orange County, close to the Pacific Ocean, and borders the cities of Aliso Viejo, Dana Point, Laguna Beach, Laguna Hills, Mission Viejo, and San Juan Capistrano.

Movies

Daniel L. Fapp either made or participated in the following movies:

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<i>To Each His Own</i> (film) 1946 film by Mitchell Leisen

To Each His Own is a 1946 American romantic drama filmdirected by Mitchell Leisen and starring Olivia de Havilland, Mary Anderson, Roland Culver, and John Lund in his first on-screen appearance, where he played dual roles as father and son. The screenplay was written by Charles Brackett and Jacques Théry. A young woman bears a child out of wedlock and has to give him up.

<i>The Big Clock</i> (film) 1948 film by John Farrow

The Big Clock is a 1948 film noir directed by John Farrow and adapted by renowned novelist-screenwriter Jonathan Latimer from the novel of the same name by Kenneth Fearing.

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References