Darrell Mudra

Last updated
Darrell Mudra
Darrell Mudra.jpg
Biographical details
Born (1929-01-14) January 14, 1929 (age 92)
Omaha, Nebraska
Playing career
Football
1950 Peru State
Position(s) Fullback
Coaching career (HC unless noted)
Football
1953 Ashland HS (NE)
1954–1956 Tekamah HS (NE)
1957 Huron (backs)
1958 Colorado State (backs)
1959–1962 Adams State
1963–1965 North Dakota State
1966 Montreal Alouettes
1967–1968 Arizona
1969–1973 Western Illinois
1974–1975 Florida State
1978–1982 Eastern Illinois
1983–1987 Northern Iowa
Basketball
1952–1953 Omaha (assistant)
1957–1958 Huron
Administrative career (AD unless noted)
1963–1966 North Dakota State
Head coaching record
Overall200–81–4 (college football)
7–7 (CFL)
Bowls3–1
TournamentsFootball
5–1 (NCAA D-II playoffs)
4–3 (NCAA D-I-AA playoffs)
Accomplishments and honors
Championships
Football
1 NCAA College Division (1965)
1 NCAA Division II (1978)
3 RMAC (1960–1962)
2 NCC (1964–1965)
1 IIAC (1969)
4 AMCU (1980–1982, 1984)
2 Gateway Collegiate (1985, 1987)
College Football Hall of Fame
Inducted in 2000 (profile)

Darrell "Dr. Victory" Mudra (born January 14, 1929) is a former American football coach. He served as the head football coach at Adams State College (1959–1962), North Dakota State University (1963–1965), the University of Arizona (1967–1968), Western Illinois University (1969–1973), Florida State University (1974–1975), Eastern Illinois University (1978–1982), and the University of Northern Iowa (1983–1987), compiling a career college football record of 200–81–4. Murdra was also the head coach of the Montreal Alouettes of the Canadian Football League (CFL) for one season in 1966. He was inducted into the College Football Hall of Fame as a coach in 2000.

Contents

Mudra played as a fullback at Peru State College and graduated from there in 1951. [1] [2]

Coaching career

In 1952, Mudra was hired as an assistant basketball coach at the University of Omaha—now known at the University of Nebraska Omaha—where he was also pursuing a master's degree in English. [3]

Mudra had an unorthodox coaching style. Throughout his days as a head coach, Mudra worked from the press box while a game was being played rather the sideline as most head coaches do. [4]

Head coaching record

College football

YearTeamOverallConferenceStandingBowl/playoffsCoaches#AP°
Adams State Indians (Rocky Mountain Conference)(1959–1962)
1959 Adams State8–13–12nd
1960 Adams State7–0–14–01st
1961 Adams State8–24–01st
1962 Adams State9–14–01stW Mineral Water
Adams State:32–4–115–1
North Dakota State Bison (North Central Conference)(1963–1965)
1963 North Dakota State 3–53–34th
1964 North Dakota State10–15–1T–1stW Mineral Water
1965 North Dakota State 11–06–01stW Pecan
North Dakota State:24–614–4
Arizona Wildcats (Western Athletic Conference)(1967–1968)
1967 Arizona 3–6–11–45th
1968 Arizona 8–35–1T–2ndL Sun
Arizona:11–9–16–5
Western Illinois Leathernecks (Interstate Intercollegiate Athletic Conference)(1969)
1969 Western Illinois8–23–01st
Western Illinois Leathernecks (NCAA College Division / Division II independent)(1970–1973)
1970 Western Illinois7–3
1971 Western Illinois8–2
1972 Western Illinois9–2
1973 Western Illinois7–4
Western Illinois:39–133–0
Florida State Seminoles (NCAA Division I independent)(1974–1975)
1974 Florida State 1–10
1975 Florida State 3–8
Florida State:4–18
Eastern Illinois Panthers (Association of Mid-Continent Universities)(1978–1982)
1978 Eastern Illinois 12–23–23rdW NCAA Division II Championship
1979 Eastern Illinois 7–41–3T–4th
1980 Eastern Illinois 11–34–01stL NCAA Division II Championship
1981 Eastern Illinois 6–52–1T–1st
1982 Eastern Illinois11–1–12–0–1T–1stL NCAA Division I-AA Quarterfinal
Eastern Illinois:47–15–112–6–1
Northern Iowa Panthers (Association of Mid-Continent Universities)(1983–1984)
1983 Northern Iowa6–51–23rd
1984 Northern Iowa9–22–1T–1st
Northern Iowa Panthers (Gateway Football Conference)(1985–1987)
1985 Northern Iowa11–25–01stL NCAA Division I-AA Semifinal
1986 Northern Iowa7–3–14–2T–2nd
1987 Northern Iowa10–46–01stL NCAA Division I-AA Semifinal
Northern Iowa:43–16–118–5
Total:200–81–4
      National championship        Conference title        Conference division title or championship game berth

See also

Related Research Articles

Tom Osborne American football player and coach, college athletics administrator, politician

Thomas William Osborne is a former American football player, coach, college athletics administrator, and politician from Nebraska. He served as head football coach of the Nebraska Cornhuskers from 1973 to 1997. After being inducted into the College Football Hall of Fame in 1999, Osborne was elected to Congress in 2000 from Nebraska's third district as a Republican. He served three terms (2001–2007), returned to the University of Nebraska as athletic director in 2007, and retired in 2013.

Ahman Green

Ahman Rashad Green is a former American football running back who played 12 seasons in the National Football League (NFL). Green played college football at Nebraska and was drafted by the Seattle Seahawks in the 3rd round of the 1998 NFL Draft, playing there for two seasons before being traded to the Green Bay Packers, with whom he played for eight of the next ten seasons. Green also played for the Houston Texans, and was a four-time Pro Bowl selection with the Packers, where he holds the franchise record for rushing yards. He is currently the head Esports coach at Lakeland University.

Johnny Steven Rodgers is an American former football player. He played college football for the Nebraska Cornhuskers and won the Heisman Trophy in 1972, the first wide receiver to win the award. Rodgers played professionally in the Canadian Football League (CFL) with the Montreal Alouettes and in the National Football League (NFL) with the San Diego Chargers. He was inducted into the College Football Hall of Fame in 2000.

John B. McLendon Jr. was an American basketball coach who is recognized as the first African American basketball coach at a predominantly white university and the first African American head coach in any professional sport. He was a major contributor to the development of modern basketball and coached on both the college and professional levels during his career. He has been enshrined three times in the Naismith Memorial Basketball Hall of Fame, and also inducted into the National Collegiate Basketball Hall of Fame.

Guy Chamberlin American football player and coach

Berlin Guy "Champ" Chamberlin, sometimes misspelled Guy Chamberlain, was an American football player and coach. He was inducted into the College Football Hall of Fame in 1962 and the Pro Football Hall of Fame in 1965. He was also named in 1969 to the NFL 1920s All-Decade Team.

Peru State College

Peru State College is a public college in Peru, Nebraska. Founded by members of the Methodist Episcopal Church in 1865, making it the first and oldest institution in Nebraska, it underwent several name changes before receiving its current name.

Eddie Crowder

Eddie Crowder was an American football player and coach. He was an All-American quarterback (QB) and safety at the University of Oklahoma (OU) in the early 1950s and a successful head coach and athletic director (AD) at the University of Colorado (CU) in the 1960s and 1970s.

Wisconsin Badgers football

The Wisconsin Badgers football program represents the University of Wisconsin–Madison in the sport of American football. Wisconsin competes in the Football Bowl Subdivision (FBS) of the National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) and the West Division of the Big Ten Conference. The Badgers have competed in the Big Ten since its formation in 1896. They play their home games at Camp Randall Stadium, the fourth-oldest stadium in college football. Wisconsin is one of 26 College football programs to win 700 or more games. Wisconsin has had two Heisman Trophy winners, Alan Ameche and Ron Dayne, and have had Eleven former players inducted into the College Football Hall of Fame.

Pete Elliott

Peter R. Elliott was an American football player and coach. Elliott served as the head football coach at the University of Nebraska–Lincoln (1956), the University of California, Berkeley (1957–1959), the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign (1960–1966), and the University of Miami (1973–1974), compiling a career college football record of 56–72–11. From 1979 to 1996, Elliott served as Executive Director of the Pro Football Hall of Fame.

Arizona Wildcats football

The Arizona Wildcats football program represents the University of Arizona in the sport of American college football. Arizona competes in the Football Bowl Subdivision (FBS) of the National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) and the South Division of the Pac-12 Conference (Pac-12).

Bill Glassford

James William Glassford was an American football player and coach, who served as head coach for the New Hampshire Wildcats and Nebraska Cornhuskers.

Ernest Bearg

Ernest Elmer Bearg was an American football and basketball coach. He served as the head football coach at Washburn University from 1918 to 1919 and again from 1929 to 1935 and the University of Nebraska–Lincoln from 1925 to 1928, compiling a career college football record of 71–40–7. Bearg also spent one year as Nebraska's men's basketball coach (1925–1926) and posted an 8–10 mark. Before coming to Nebraska, he also served as an assistant coach at the University of Illinois at Urbana–Champaign under Robert Zuppke

Eastern Illinois Panthers football

The Eastern Illinois Panthers football program is the intercollegiate American football team for Eastern Illinois University located in the U.S. state of Illinois. The team competes in the NCAA Division I Football Championship Subdivision (FCS) and are members of the Ohio Valley Conference. The school's first football team was fielded in 1899. The team plays its home games at the 10,000 seat O'Brien Field, which is named after head coach Maynard O'Brien.

Cy Sherman

Charles Sumner "Cy" Sherman was an American journalist and is known as the "father of the Cornhuskers" after giving the Nebraska Cornhuskers football team the name "Cornhuskers" in 1899. At his suggestion in 1936, Associated Press (AP) sports editor Alan J. Gould created the first AP Poll for ranking college football teams. Sherman began his career writing at the Nebraska State Journal in Lincoln, spent a short time at the Red Lodge, Montana Pickett before returning to Lincoln and the Lincoln Star where he spent most of his career. At his death he was called by the Star the "Dean of American Sportswriters".

Harry W. Ewing

Harry Walter "Buck" Ewing was an American football player, coach of football, basketball and baseball, and college athletics administrator. He was a 1909 graduate of University of Nebraska where he played football. Ewing served as the head football coach at Morningside College (1911), South Dakota State College (1912–1917), Ohio Wesleyan University (1919–1921), Miami University (1922–1923), and Otterbein College, compiling a career college football record of 82–82–10. He was also the head basketball coach at South Dakota State, Ohio Wesleyan (1919–1920), Miami (1922–1924), and Otterbein (1942–1952), tallying a career college basketball mark of 117–111–1.

The 2017 Nebraska Cornhuskers football team represented the University of Nebraska during the 2017 NCAA Division I FBS football season. The team was coached by third-year head coach Mike Riley and played their home games at Memorial Stadium in Lincoln, Nebraska. They competed as members of the West Division of the Big Ten Conference. They finished the season 4–8, 3–6 in Big Ten play to finish in fifth place in the West Division.

Edward E. "Blue" Howell was an American football player and coach. He was the fifth head football coach at Kansas State Teachers College of Pittsburg—now known as Pittsburg State University—in Pittsburg, Kansas, serving for eight seasons, from 1929 to 1935 and again in 1937, compiling a record of 35–30–6.

Timothy M. McGuire is an American football coach. He served as the head coach at Morningside College from 1981 to 1982 and at Indiana State University from 1998 to 2004.

The 2018 Nebraska Cornhuskers football team represented the University of Nebraska in the 2018 NCAA Division I FBS football season. The team was coached by first-year head coach Scott Frost and played their home games at Memorial Stadium in Lincoln, Nebraska. They competed as members of the West Division of the Big Ten Conference.

References

  1. Darrell Murda, Peru State Bobcats Hall of Fame Website Listing http://pscbobcats.com/hof.aspx?hof=37&path=&kiosk=
  2. "The Peruvian" Nebraska State Teachers College Yearbook from 1951 https://issuu.com/psclibrary/docs/1951 page 38
  3. "Former Peru Athlete Gets Omaha U. Post". Lincoln Journal Star . Lincoln, Nebraska. Associated Press. October 31, 1952. p. 11. Retrieved October 2, 2019 via Newspapers.com Open Access logo PLoS transparent.svg .
  4. Darrell Mudra Seminole's long distance coach runs games from press box