Dash For Cash

Last updated
Dash For Cash
Amarillo Texas - AQHA - Dash for Cash.jpg
Dash For Cash statue at the AQHA Headquarters in Amarillo, Texas
Breed Quarter Horse
Discipline Racing
Sire Rocket Wrangler
Grandsire Rocket Bar (TB)
DamFind A Buyer (TB)
Maternal grandsireTo Market (TB)
SexStallion
Foaled1973
CountryUnited States
ColorSorrel
BreederB. F. Phillips, Jr.
Record
25–21–3–0
Earnings
$507,687.00
Major wins
Sun Country Futurity, Lubbock Downs Futurity, Los Alamitos Derby, Champion of Champions (twice)
Awards
1976 World Champion Quarter Running Horse, 1977 World Champion Quarter Running Horse
Honors
American Quarter Horse Hall of Fame
Last updated on: January 11, 2008.

Dash For Cash (April 17, 1973 May 20, 1996) was an American Quarter Horse racehorse and an influential sire in the Quarter Horse breed.

American Quarter Horse American horse breed

The American Quarter Horse, or Quarter Horse, is an American breed of horse that excels at sprinting short distances. Its name came from its ability to outdistance other horse breeds in races of a quarter mile or less; some have been clocked at speeds up to 55 mph (88.5 km/h). The American Quarter Horse is the most popular breed in the United States today, and the American Quarter Horse Association is the largest breed registry in the world, with almost 3 million living American Quarter Horses registered in 2014.

Contents

Racing career

Dash For Cash won $507,688 during his career and was the Racing World Champion in 1976 and 1977.

Dash For Cash victories came in the Champion of Champions (1976, 1977), Sun Country Futurity, Los Alamitos Invitational Champ, Los Alamitos Derby, Vessels Maturity, and the Lubbock Downs Futurity.

In May 1996, Dash for Cash developed complications from equine protozoal myeloencephalitis and was euthanized. [1]

Equine protozoal myeloencephalitis

Equine protozoal myeloencephalitis (EPM), is a disease caused by the apicomplexan parasite Sarcocystis neurona that affects the central nervous system of horses.

Euthanasia is the practice of intentionally ending a life to relieve pain and suffering.

Dash For Cash was inducted into the AQHA Hall of Fame in 1997. [1]

The American Quarter Horse Hall of Fame and Museum was created by the American Quarter Horse Association (AQHA), based in Amarillo, Texas. Ground breaking construction of the Hall of Fame Museum began in 1989.The distinction is earned by people and horses who have contributed to the growth of the American Quarter Horse and "have been outstanding over a period of years in a variety of categories". In 1982, Bob Denhardt and Ernest Browning were the first individuals to receive the honor of being inducted into the AQHA Hall of Fame. In 1989, Wimpy P-1, King P-234, Leo and Three Bars were the first horses inducted into the AQHA Hall of Fame.

Pedigree

Percentage (TB)
Three Bars (TB)
Myrtle Dee (TB)
Rocket Bar (TB)
Cartago (TB)
Golden Rocket (TB)
Morshion (TB)
Rocket Wrangler
Top Deck (TB)
Go Man Go
Lightfoot Sis
Go Galla Go
Direct Win (TB)
La Galla Win
La Gallina V
Dash For Cash
Brokers Tip (TB)
Market Wise (TB)
On Hand (TB)
To Market (TB)
Johnstown (TB)
Pretty Does (TB)
Creese (TB)
Find a Buyer (TB)
=Hyperion (TB)
*Alibhai (TB)
=Teresina (TB)
Hide And Seek (TB)
Whirlaway (TB)
Scattered (TB)
Imperatrice (TB)

Notes

  1. 1 2 American Quarter Horse Association (AQHA). "Dash For Cash". AQHA Hall of Fame. American Quarter Horse Association. Retrieved August 30, 2017.

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References

Further reading