Dasnice

Last updated
Dasnice
Municipality and village
Dasnice.jpg
Railway station
Flag of Dasnice.svg
Flag
Dasnice znak.jpg
Coat of arms
Dasnice SO CZ.png
Czech Republic adm location map.svg
Red pog.svg
Dasnice
Location in the Czech Republic
Coordinates: 50°09′N12°34′E / 50.150°N 12.567°E / 50.150; 12.567 Coordinates: 50°09′N12°34′E / 50.150°N 12.567°E / 50.150; 12.567
CountryFlag of the Czech Republic.svg  Czech Republic
Region Karlovy Vary Region
District Sokolov District
Area
  Total4.03 km2 (1.56 sq mi)
Elevation
442 m (1,450 ft)
Population
 (2011)
  Total370
Time zone UTC+1 (CET)
  Summer (DST) UTC+2 (CEST)
Website https://www.dasnice.eu/

Dasnice (German : Daßnitz) is a village and municipality in Sokolov District in the Karlovy Vary Region of the Czech Republic.

Notable people



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