Dave Butz

Last updated

Dave Butz
No. 62, 65
Position: Defensive tackle
Personal information
Born: (1950-06-23) June 23, 1950 (age 70)
Lafayette, Alabama
Height:6 ft 8 in (2.03 m)
Weight:295 lb (134 kg)
Career information
High school: Park Ridge (IL) Maine South
College: Purdue
NFL Draft: 1973  / Round: 1 / Pick: 5
Career history
Career highlights and awards
Career NFL statistics
Sacks:35.5
Games played:216
Interceptions:2
Player stats at NFL.com

David Butz (born June 23, 1950) is an American former professional football player who was a defensive tackle in the National Football League (NFL) for the St. Louis Cardinals and the Washington Redskins in a 16-year career from 1973 to 1988. He played college football for the Purdue Boilermakers.

Contents

Early career

Butz played high school football at Maine South High School in Park Ridge, Illinois, where he was two-time high school All-American. [1] He also played basketball and was the Illinois High School discus champion, setting a state record. [1] He then played college football at Purdue University, where he was a 1972 finalist for the Lombardi Award. [1] He was a 1st team All-Big Ten member and played in both the East-West Shrine Game and Senior Bowl, where he was named the Defensive MVP. [2]

At the victory parade following the Redskins win in Super Bowl XXII, Butz famously shouted to the crowd, "We came, we saw, we kicked their butz." [3]

Butz was later named to Purdue's All Time Football team [1] and was elected to the College Football Hall of Fame in 2014. [4]

Professional career

Butz was drafted in the first round (fifth overall) of the 1973 NFL Draft by the St. Louis Cardinals, where he would play for two seasons. Redskins coach George Allen gave the Cardinals two first-round draft picks and a second-rounder for the right to Butz. [5] Butz then played for the Washington Redskins for 14 years, where he had three Super Bowl appearances. He ranks third in franchise history in sacks (59.5). [5] He was a one-time Pro Bowler in 1983 in a season in which he got eleven sacks, a career-best. He only missed four games in his entire 16-year career. [1] Butz was among the largest players in the NFL when he played standing 6'8" and routinely weighing around 300 pounds. When he retired, he was the oldest starting player in the NFL. [6]

Butz was selected to the NFL 1980s All-Decade Team and was named one of the 70 Greatest Redskins. In 1975 Butz was granted free agency due to a mistake in his contract that he signed as a rookie in 1973. George Allen quickly signed him, but the NFL ruled that the Redskins had to pay the Cardinals 2 first-round picks (1977 & 1978) and a second-round pick (1979).

After football

Butz has recently served as a consultant and board member for the National Rifle Association. [1]

Family

Butz lives in Fairfax, Virginia. [1]

He is the nephew of Earl Butz, a former United States Secretary of Agriculture under Presidents Richard Nixon and Gerald Ford; his uncle held the Cabinet post during Butz's first season in Washington. [1]

Related Research Articles

Jeffrey Marc Zgonina is an American football assistant defensive line coach for the Washington Football Team and former defensive tackle who played seventeen seasons in the National Football League (NFL). He played college football at Purdue University and was drafted by the Pittsburgh Steelers in the seventh round of the 1993 NFL Draft.

Brandon Gorin

Brandon Michael Gorin is a former American football offensive tackle. He was drafted by the San Diego Chargers in the seventh round of the 2001 NFL Draft. He played college football at Purdue.

Wilber Buddyhia Marshall is an American former professional football player who was a linebacker in the National Football League (NFL) for five teams from 1984 until 1995. Marshall played college football for the Florida Gators, was twice recognized as a consensus All-American, and is a member of the College Football Hall of Fame.

Russell James Maryland is a former professional American football player. He played defensive tackle for ten seasons for the Dallas Cowboys, Oakland Raiders and Green Bay Packers of the National Football League (NFL). He was drafted by the Cowboys first overall in the 1991 NFL Draft. He played college football for the University of Miami Hurricanes.

Otis Armstrong is a former American football running back in the National Football League (NFL). He was selected in the 1st round in the 1973 NFL Draft. He played for the Denver Broncos for his entire career from 1973 to 1980.

Mark May American college and professional football player

Mark Eric May is a former American college and professional football player who was an offensive lineman in the National Football League (NFL) for 13 seasons during the 1980s and 1990s. May played college football for the University of Pittsburgh and earned All-American honors. He was selected in the first round of the 1981 NFL Draft, and played professionally for the Washington Redskins, San Diego Chargers, and Arizona Cardinals. He was laid off by ESPN on April 28, 2017, after serving with the organization for 16 years.

Chris Hanburger

Christian G. Hanburger, Jr. is a former American football linebacker in the National Football League (NFL) who played his entire 14-year career with the Washington Redskins from 1965 to 1978. He was elected to the Pro Football Hall of Fame in 2011.

Boyd Hamilton Dowler is a former professional football player, a wide receiver in the National Football League. He played 12 seasons from 1959 to 1971, 11 with the Green Bay Packers and one with the Washington Redskins.

Purdue Boilermakers football Football team of Purdue University

The Purdue Boilermakers football team represents Purdue University in the NCAA Football Bowl Subdivision (FBS) of college football. Purdue plays its home games at Ross–Ade Stadium on the campus of Purdue University in West Lafayette, Indiana. The head coach of Purdue is Jeff Brohm, the 36th head coach in program history. The Boilermakers compete in the Big Ten Conference as a member of the West Division. Purdue had most recently been a part of the Leaders Division of the Big Ten, but moved to the West Division in 2014 due to conference expansion.

Anthony Poindexter American football safety and coach

Anthony Scott Poindexter is an American football coach and former safety, who is the current safeties coach for the Penn State Nittany Lions. He played college football at Virignia from 1995 to 1998 for head coach George Welsh, and earned All-American honors. He then played in the National Football League (NFL) for the Baltimore Ravens and Cleveland Browns from 1999 to 2001.

Donald Dwain Brumm is a former American football defensive lineman in the National Football League for the St. Louis Cardinals and the Philadelphia Eagles. He went to one Pro Bowl during his ten-year career. Brumm played college football at Purdue University and was drafted in the first round of the 1963 NFL Draft. He was also selected in the third round of the 1963 AFL Draft by the Kansas City Chiefs.

Marvin Leroy Keyes was an American professional football player who was a running back and safety for five seasons in the National Football League (NFL) with the Philadelphia Eagles and the Kansas City Chiefs. He was drafted by the Eagles in the first round of the 1969 NFL Draft. He played college football for the Purdue Boilermakers. He was an All-American as a halfback on offense and played corner on defense and returned kicks and punts. He also played both ways for Philadelphia before settling in as a solid strong safety.

Clarence Vaughn

Clarence Vaughn is a former American football safety in the National Football League (NFL) for the Washington Redskins.

Dean Edward Hamel is a former American football defensive tackle in the National Football League for the Washington Redskins and Dallas Cowboys. He played college football at the University of Tulsa and was drafted in the twelfth round of the 1985 NFL Draft.

Washington Football Team draft history

This is a list of the Washington Football Team selections in the NFL Draft. The team was founded as the Boston Braves 1932, named after the local baseball franchise. The team changed their name to the Redskins in 1933 and moved to Washington, D.C. in 1937.

Mike Neal American football outside linebacker

Michael Jamel Neal is a former American football outside linebacker who played for the Green Bay Packers of the National Football League (NFL). He played college football at Purdue. Neal was drafted by the Green Bay Packers in the second round of the 2010 NFL Draft. With Green Bay, he won Super Bowl XLV in Arlington, Texas over the Pittsburgh Steelers.

Ryan Kerrigan American football player

Patrick Ryan Kerrigan is an American football defensive end for the Philadelphia Eagles of the National Football League (NFL). He played college football at Purdue, where he was recognized as a unanimous All-American as a senior, and was drafted by the Washington Football Team, then known as the Redskins, in the first round of the 2011 NFL Draft. He played the majority of his career as an outside linebacker in the 3–4 defense, where he is the all-time NFL leader in consecutive starts by a left outside linebacker. He is also Washington's all-time leader in sacks, recording 95.5 of them during his 10 years with the team.

Brandon Jenkins is a former American football linebacker. He played college football for Florida State University as a defensive end. The Washington Redskins selected him in the fifth round of the 2013 NFL Draft.

References

  1. 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 "Eight Former Boilermakers To Be Inducted Into Intercollegiate Athletics Hall of Fame". Purdue's Official Athletic site. Retrieved 2008-02-15.
  2. "College Football Hall of Fame". www.footballfoundation.org.
  3. "'King for a Day' Set for a Premiere". Los Angeles Times. 1988-02-05. Retrieved 2009-10-15.
  4. National Football Foundation (2014-05-22). "NFF Proudly Announces Impressive 2014 College Football Hall of Fame Class". FootballFoundation.org. Archived from the original on 2014-05-29. Retrieved 2014-05-22.
  5. 1 2 Richman, Michael (2008). The Redskins Encyclopedia . Philadelphia: Temple University Press. pp.  277. ISBN   978-1-59213-542-4.
  6. "No More Ifs for Butz". New York Times. 1989-05-19. Retrieved 2008-02-15.