David D. Newsom

Last updated
David D. Newsom
Newsom 1975.png
Newsom in 1975
Under Secretary of State for Political Affairs
In office
April 19, 1978 February 27, 1981
Preceded by Philip C. Habib
Succeeded by Walter J. Stoessel, Jr.
United States Ambassador to the Philippines
In office
November 11, 1977 March 30, 1978
President Jimmy Carter
Preceded by William H. Sullivan
Succeeded by Richard W. Murphy
United States Ambassador to Indonesia
In office
December 19, 1973 October 6, 1977
President Richard Nixon
Gerald Ford
Jimmy Carter
Preceded by Francis Joseph Galbraith
Succeeded by Edward E. Masters
United States Ambassador to Libya
In office
July 22, 1965 June 21, 1969
President Lyndon B. Johnson
Richard Nixon
Preceded by Edwin Allan Lightner
Succeeded by Joseph Palmer II
Personal details
Born
David Dunlop Newsom

(1918-01-06)January 6, 1918
DiedMarch 30, 2008(2008-03-30) (aged 90)

David Dunlop Newsom (January 6, 1918 – March 30, 2008) was an American diplomat. He served as the United States Ambassador to Libya from 1965 to 1969, the United States Assistant Secretary of State for African Affairs from 1969 to 1974, the United States Ambassador to Indonesia from 1973 to 1977 and the United States Ambassador to the Philippines from 1977 to 1978. [1]

Contents

In October 1979, when Mohammad Reza Pahlavi checked into the New York Hospital-Cornell Medical Center, he used "David D. Newsom" as his temporary codename without Newsom's knowledge.

Mohammad Reza Pahlavi the last shah of Iran

Mohammad Reza Pahlavi, also known as Mohammad Reza Shah, was the last Shah of Iran from 16 September 1941 until his overthrow by the Iranian Revolution on 11 February 1979. Mohammad Reza Shah took the title Shahanshah on 26 October 1967. He was the second and last monarch of the House of Pahlavi. Mohammad Reza Shah Pahlavi held several other titles, including that of Aryamehr and Bozorg Arteshtaran ("Commander-in-Chief"). His dream of what he referred to as a "Great Civilisation" in Iran led to a rapid industrial and military modernisation, as well as economic and social reforms.

Newsom was also the author of six books and a regular columnist for The Christian Science Monitor, contributing over 400 columns from 1981 to 2005.

<i>The Christian Science Monitor</i> Nonprofit news organization owned by the Church of Christ, Scientist

The Christian Science Monitor (CSM) is a nonprofit news organization that publishes daily articles in electronic format as well as a weekly print edition. It was founded in 1908 as a daily newspaper by Mary Baker Eddy, the founder of the Church of Christ, Scientist. As of 2011, the print circulation was 75,052.

On June 16, 2004 he joined a group of twenty seven called Diplomats and Military Commanders for Change opposing the Iraq War.

Diplomats and Military Commanders for Change (DMCC) was an ad hoc organization of 27 retired and United States military officers and Foreign Service Officers who supported Democratic U.S. Senator John Kerry of Massachusetts against incumbent Republican George W. Bush in the 2004 presidential election.

Iraq War War which started on 20 March 2003, based in Iraq

The Iraq War was a protracted armed conflict that began in 2003 with the invasion of Iraq by a United States-led coalition that overthrew the government of Saddam Hussein. The conflict continued for much of the next decade as an insurgency emerged to oppose the occupying forces and the post-invasion Iraqi government. An estimated 151,000 to 600,000 or more Iraqis were killed in the first three to four years of conflict. In 2009, official US troops were withdrawn, but American soldiers continued to remain on the ground fighting in Iraq, hired by defence contractors and private military companies. The U.S. became re-involved in 2014 at the head of a new coalition; the insurgency and many dimensions of the civil armed conflict continue. The invasion occurred as part of a declared war against international terrorism and its sponsors under the administration of U.S. President George W. Bush following the unrelated September 11 terrorist attacks.

Notes

  1. "David Dunlap Newsom (1918–2008)". U.S. State Department. Retrieved 10 September 2017.

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References

Diplomatic posts
Preceded by
William H. Sullivan
United States Ambassador to the Philippines
1977–1978
Succeeded by
Richard W. Murphy
Preceded by
Francis Joseph Galbraith
United States Ambassador to Indonesia
1973–1977
Succeeded by
Edward E. Masters
Preceded by
Edwin Allan Lightner
United States Ambassador to Libya
1965–1969
Succeeded by
Joseph Palmer II