David Kinley

Last updated

David Kinley
Born(1861-08-02)2 August 1861
Dundee, Scotland
Died 3 December 1944(1944-12-03) (aged 83)
Nationality Scottish American
Institution University of Illinois
Alma mater University of Wisconsin–Madison
Johns Hopkins University
Doctoral
advisor
Richard T. Ely

David Kinley (2 August 1861 – 3 December 1944) was a Scotland-born economist who worked in the United States. He was head of the department of economics of the University of Illinois and later president of the University. As an economist, he was of the classical school, and his main interest was in money and banking. Administration gradually took up most of his time as his career progressed.

Economist professional in the social science discipline of economics

An economist is a practitioner in the social science discipline of economics.

United States federal republic in North America

The United States of America (USA), commonly known as the United States or America, is a country composed of 50 states, a federal district, five major self-governing territories, and various possessions. At 3.8 million square miles, the United States is the world's third or fourth largest country by total area and is slightly smaller than the entire continent of Europe's 3.9 million square miles. With a population of over 327 million people, the U.S. is the third most populous country. The capital is Washington, D.C., and the largest city by population is New York City. Forty-eight states and the capital's federal district are contiguous in North America between Canada and Mexico. The State of Alaska is in the northwest corner of North America, bordered by Canada to the east and across the Bering Strait from Russia to the west. The State of Hawaii is an archipelago in the mid-Pacific Ocean. The U.S. territories are scattered about the Pacific Ocean and the Caribbean Sea, stretching across nine official time zones. The extremely diverse geography, climate, and wildlife of the United States make it one of the world's 17 megadiverse countries.

Classical economics or classical political economy is a school of thought in economics that flourished, primarily in Britain, in the late 18th and early-to-mid 19th century. Its main thinkers are held to be Adam Smith, Jean-Baptiste Say, David Ricardo, Thomas Robert Malthus, and John Stuart Mill. These economists produced a theory of market economies as largely self-regulating systems, governed by natural laws of production and exchange.

Contents

Biography

Kinley was born in Dundee, Scotland. He emigrated to the United States with his family in 1872. He received his early education at Phillips Andover Academy in Andover, Massachusetts and from there went to Yale University where he graduated in 1884. He then became principal of North Andover High School for six years. In 1890, he left to do graduate work at Johns Hopkins University, primarily under Richard Ely. He accompanied Ely to the University of Wisconsin where he received his Ph.D. in 1893.

Dundee City and council area

Dundee is Scotland's fourth-largest city and the 51st-most-populous built-up area in the United Kingdom. The mid-year population estimate for 2016 was 148,270, giving Dundee a population density of 2,478/km2 or 6,420/sq mi, the second-highest in Scotland. It lies within the eastern central Lowlands on the north bank of the Firth of Tay, which feeds into the North Sea. Under the name of Dundee City, it forms one of the 32 council areas used for local government in Scotland.

Scotland Country in Europe, part of the United Kingdom

Scotland is a country that is part of the United Kingdom. Sharing a border with England to the southeast, Scotland is otherwise surrounded by the Atlantic Ocean to the north and west, by the North Sea to the northeast and by the Irish Sea to the south. In addition to the mainland, situated on the northern third of the island of Great Britain, Scotland has over 790 islands, including the Northern Isles and the Hebrides.

Andover, Massachusetts Town in Massachusetts, United States

Andover is a town in Essex County, Massachusetts, United States. It was settled in 1642 and incorporated in 1646. As of the 2010 census, the population was 33,201. It is part of the Boston-Cambridge-Quincy, Massachusetts-New Hampshire metropolitan statistical area. Part of the town comprises the census-designated place of Andover. It is twinned with its namesake: Andover, Hampshire, England.

That same year, he became assistant professor of economics at the University of Illinois. In 1894, he was appointed full professor, head of the department of economics and dean of the college of literature and arts. Later he became dean of the graduate school. He was head of the department of economics until 1915.

Assistant professor is an academic rank used in universities or colleges in the United States, Canada, and some other countries.

Along with his responsibilities as dean, he directed the "Training for Business" courses which he organized into a college of commerce and business administration. He became vice-president of the University of Illinois, then acting president, and finally, in 1920, president.

He served with the Illinois Industrial Insurance Company (1906-7) and the Illinois Tax Commission (1910 and 1930). He was an envoy on the governments behalf to various international conferences, and was a member of numerous committees. As a classical economist, in his presidential address of 1914 JSTOR   1827701 before the American Economic Association he expressed his concern that once government involved itself in attempting to control economic activity, the ruling classes would move to other spheres of human endeavor, religion and politics for example.

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American Economic Association Learned society in the field of economics

The American Economic Association (AEA) is a learned society in the field of economics, headquartered in Nashville, Tennessee. It publishes one of the most prestigious academic journals in economics: the American Economic Review. The AEA was established in 1885 in Saratoga, New York by younger progressive economists trained in the German historical school, including Richard T. Ely, Edwin Robert Anderson Seligman and Katharine Coman, the only woman co-founder; since 1900 it has been under the control of academics.

Writings

His publications include The Independent Treasury of the United States, his doctoral dissertation (1893), and a report to the Comptroller of the Currency on The Use of Credit Paper in Our Currency, published in the Report of the Comptroller for the year 1896. In 1904, he wrote "Money" [1] . Following the Panic of 1907, he continued his work for the Comptroller with two monographs prepared at the request of a national monetary commission: "The Independent Treasury of the United States and Its Relation to the Banks of the Country" [2] and "The Use of Credit Instruments in Payments in the United States."

Panic of 1907 three-week financial crisis in the United States

The Panic of 1907 – also known as the 1907 Bankers' Panic or Knickerbocker Crisis – was a United States financial crisis that took place over a three-week period starting in mid-October, when the New York Stock Exchange fell almost 50% from its peak the previous year. Panic occurred, as this was during a time of economic recession, and there were numerous runs on banks and trust companies. The 1907 panic eventually spread throughout the nation when many state and local banks and businesses entered bankruptcy. Primary causes of the run included a retraction of market liquidity by a number of New York City banks and a loss of confidence among depositors, exacerbated by unregulated side bets at bucket shops. The panic was triggered by the failed attempt in October 1907 to corner the market on stock of the United Copper Company. When this bid failed, banks that had lent money to the cornering scheme suffered runs that later spread to affiliated banks and trusts, leading a week later to the downfall of the Knickerbocker Trust Company—New York City's third-largest trust. The collapse of the Knickerbocker spread fear throughout the city's trusts as regional banks withdrew reserves from New York City banks. Panic extended across the nation as vast numbers of people withdrew deposits from their regional banks.

Family

He married Kate Ruth Neal in 1897. She died in 1931 in Hong Kong while accompanying Kinley on a professional trip.

Notes

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References

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