David Olmsted

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Gentlemen: In accepting the station which your partiality has called me to occupy, my first emotions are to thank you heartily for the honor which you have thus unexpectedly conferred upon me. At the same time, however, I beg leave candidly to assure you that I had hoped that your choice would have fallen upon some one of your number whose talents and experience I know, render them better qualified than myself to preside over the deliberations of this Council.

Possessing but little knowledge in legislation, and but a limited knowledge of parliamentary practice, it is but natural that I should have felt some hesitation in accepting a post where the responsibilities are so great, and the duties so embarrassing, and were it not for the reliance which I place upon your generous assistance and forbearance, I should certainly feel it my duty to decline the honor which you have so magnanimously proffered me.

In view of the high responsibilities devolving upon the Chair, it will not, I trust, be expected, that I shall on all occasions, be able to discharge my duties entirely satisfactory to you all, and should errors occur, as they undoubtedly will, I claim the right to throw myself upon your indulgence, fully assured that you will ever be ready to assist, and if necessary, to forgive.

Believing that an honor of this character should neither be sought nor avoided, I feel myself at liberty to accept this appointment, and in conclusion, will again tender you my thanks for this flattering demonstration of your kindness.

David Olmsted, The Minnesota Pioneer [6]

The following day, committees were appointed. Olmsted, as president, would serve on none during his first term.

Legacy

Olmsted County, Minnesota, is named in his honor. [7]

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References

  1. "Minnesota Senate President and President Pro Tempore, 1849-present - Minnesota Legislative Reference Library". www.lrl.mn.gov. Retrieved 2021-02-13.
  2. Minnesota Legislators Past and Present-David Olmsted
  3. Upham, Warren (1920). Minnesota Geographic Names: Their Origin and Historic Significance. Minnesota Historical Society. p.  385.
  4. Williams, John Fletcher. 1880: Memoir of Hon. David Olmsted. Minnesota Historical Society, St. Paul.
  5. "Legislature". The Minnesota Pioneer . 6 Sep 1849. Retrieved 13 Feb 2021.{{cite news}}: CS1 maint: url-status (link)
  6. "Legislature". The Minnesota Pioneer . 6 Sep 1849. Retrieved 13 Feb 2021.{{cite news}}: CS1 maint: url-status (link)
  7. "History of Olmsted County". Archived from the original on 2018-10-10. Retrieved 2011-12-30.
David Olmsted
1st President of the Minnesota Territorial Council
In office
September 4, 1849 January 1, 1851