Dedumose I

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Djedhotepre Dedumose I was an Egyptian pharaoh of the Second Intermediate Period. According to egyptologists Kim Ryholt, Darrell Baker, Aidan Dodson and Dyan Hilton, he was a king of the 16th Dynasty. [2] [3] [4] Alternatively, Jürgen von Beckerath, Thomas Schneider and Detlef Franke see him as a king of the 13th Dynasty. [5] [6] [7] [8]

Pharaoh Title of Ancient Egyptian rulers

Pharaoh is the common title of the monarchs of ancient Egypt from the First Dynasty until the annexation of Egypt by the Roman Empire in 30 BCE, although the actual term "Pharaoh" was not used contemporaneously for a ruler until Merneptah, c. 1200 BCE. In the early dynasty, ancient Egyptian kings used to have up to three titles, the Horus, the Sedge and Bee (nswt-bjtj) name, and the Two Ladies (nbtj) name. The Golden Horus and nomen and prenomen titles were later added.

Kim Steven Bardrum Ryholt is a professor of Egyptology at the University of Copenhagen and a specialist on Egyptian history and literature. He is director of the research center Canon and Identity Formation in the Earliest Literate Societies under the University of Copenhagen Programme of Excellence and director of The Papyrus Carlsberg Collection & Project.

Sixteenth Dynasty of Egypt

The Sixteenth Dynasty of ancient Egypt was a dynasty of pharaohs that ruled the Theban region in Upper Egypt for 70 years.

Contents

Attestations

Djedhotepre Dedumose is mentioned on stela found in July 1908 in the southern part of the Tell of Edfu. [1] The stele belongs to a king's son and commander Khonsuemwaset (" Khonsu is in Waset "). It is not known whether the latter was indeed the son of the king or if king's son is here only the title, which was not necessarily reserved to the actual children of a king. Another king of the Second Intermediate Period bears the name Dedumose: Djedneferre Dedumose II. Given the rarity of the name Dedumose, it is possible that he was the son of Dedumose I. A number of artefacts name a king Dedumose but without providing the prenomen, it is difficult to decide to which Dedumose they belong. [3] For example, a stela of an official Harsekher from Edfu states that the King's Son Harsekher, son of the King's Son Sobekhotep is related to a king Dedumose, [3] which Aidan Dodson and Dyan Hilton identify as Dedumose I. [2]

Tell (archaeology) Ancient settlement mound

In archaeology, a tell, or tel, is an artificial mound formed from the accumulated refuse of generations of people living on the same site for hundreds or thousands of years. A classic tell looks like a low, truncated cone with sloping sides and can be up to 30 metres high.

Edfu Place in Aswan Governorate, Egypt

Edfu is an Egyptian city, located on the west bank of the Nile River between Esna and Aswan, with a population of approximately sixty thousand people. For the ancient history of the city, see below. Edfu is the site of the Ptolemaic Temple of Horus and an ancient settlement, Tell Edfu. About 5 km (3.1 mi) north of Edfu are remains of ancient pyramids.

Khonsu Ancient Egyptian god of the moon

Khonsu is the Ancient Egyptian god of the moon. His name means "traveller", and this may relate to the nightly travel of the moon across the sky. Along with Thoth he marked the passage of time. Khonsu was instrumental in the creation of new life in all living creatures. At Thebes he formed part of a family triad with Mut as his mother and Amun his father.

Chronological position

Precise dates for Dedumose are unknown, but if he was a king of the 13th Dynasty, his reign probably ended around 1690 BC while if he was a king of the 16th Dynasty, he would possibly have reigned between 1588 BC and 1582 BC, in the final years of the 16th Dynasty. [3] Ryholt believes that facing the invasion of his territory by the Hyksos, Dedumose tried to sue them for peace, as indicated by his names "The peace of Ra is stable; He who brings peace; He who rescues the two lands". [3]

Hyksos Asian invaders of Egypt, established 15th dynasty ca. 1650-1550 BC

The Hyksos were a people of diverse origins, possibly from Western Asia, who settled in the eastern Nile Delta some time before 1650 BC. The arrival of the Hyksos led to the end of the Thirteenth Dynasty and initiated the Second Intermediate Period of Egypt. In the context of Ancient Egypt, the term "Asiatic" may refer to people native to areas east of Egypt.

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References

  1. 1 2 3 A Barsanti: Stèle inédite au nom du roi Radadaouhotep Doudoumes, in: ASAE 9 (1908), pl. 1-2, available copyright-free online
  2. 1 2 3 Aidan Dodson, Dyan Hilton: The Complete Royal Families of Ancient Egypt, Thames and Hudson, 2004, p. 117
  3. 1 2 3 4 5 K. S. B. Ryholt: The Political Situation in Egypt during the Second Intermediate Period, c. 1800 - 1550 BC. Copenhagen: Museum Tusculanum Press. ISBN   87-7289-421-0, p. 402
  4. Darrell D. Baker: The Encyclopedia of the Pharaohs: Volume I - Predynastic to the Twentieth Dynasty 3300–1069 BC, Stacey International, ISBN   978-1-905299-37-9, 2008
  5. Jürgen von Beckerath: Untersuchungen zur politischen Geschichte der Zweiten Zwischenzeit in Ägypten, Glückstadt, 1964
  6. Jürgen von Beckerath: Chronologie des pharaonischen Ägyptens, Münchner Ägyptologische Studien 46, Mainz am Rhein, 1997
  7. Thomas Schneider: Ancient Egyptian Chronology - Edited by Erik Hornung, Rolf Krauss, And David a. Warburton, available online, see p. 187
  8. Detlef Franke: Das Heiligtum des Heqaib auf Elephantine. Geschichte eines Provinzheiligtums im Mittleren Reich, Studien zur Archäologie und Geschichte Altägyptens. vol. 9. Heidelberger Orientverlag, Heidelberg 1994, ISBN   3-927552-17-8 (Heidelberg, Universität, Habilitationsschrift, 1991), see p. 77-78