Del Webb

Last updated

Del Webb
Del Webb Memorial Hospital.jpg
Del Webb Memorial Hospital
BornDelbert Eugene Webb
(1899-05-17)May 17, 1899
Fresno, California, US
Died July 4, 1974(1974-07-04) (aged 75)
Rochester, Minnesota, US
Occupation real estate developer
Employer Del E. Webb Construction Company
Known for co-owner of the New York Yankees
Spouse(s) Hazel Lenora Church (1919–1952)
Toni Ince Webb (1961–1974)
Parent(s) Ernest G. Webb
Henrietta S. Webb

Delbert Eugene Webb (May 17, 1899 – July 4, 1974) was an American real estate developer, and a co-owner of the New York Yankees baseball club. He is known for founding and developing the retirement community of Sun City, Arizona, and for many works of his firm, Del E. Webb Construction Company.

New York Yankees Baseball team and Major League Baseball franchise in the Bronx, New York, United States

The New York Yankees are an American professional baseball team based in the New York City borough of the Bronx. The Yankees compete in Major League Baseball (MLB) as a member club of the American League (AL) East division. They are one of two major league clubs based in New York City, the other being the New York Mets of the National League. In the 1901 season, the club began play in the AL as the Baltimore Orioles. Frank Farrell and Bill Devery purchased the franchise and moved it to New York City, renaming the club the New York Highlanders. The Highlanders were officially renamed the Yankees in 1913.

A retirement community is a residential community or housing complex designed for older adults who are generally able to care for themselves; however, assistance from home care agencies is allowed in some communities, and activities and socialization opportunities are often provided. Some of the characteristics typically are: the community must be age-restricted or age-qualified, residents must be partially or fully retired, and the community offers shared services or amenities.

Sun City, Arizona Census-designated place & Unincorporated community in Arizona, United States

Sun City is a census-designated place and unincorporated community in Maricopa County, Arizona, United States, that is within the Phoenix metropolitan area. The population was 37,499 according to the 2010 census. Its adjoining sister city is Sun City West. Both cities are retirement communities popular with snowbirds.

Contents

Early years

Webb was born in Fresno, California, to Ernest G. Webb, a fruit farmer, and Henrietta S. Webb. He dropped out of high school to become a carpenter's apprentice, and in 1919, he married Hazel Lenora Church, a graduate nurse. In 1920, Webb was a ship fitter, and they were living with his parents and two younger brothers in Placer County, California. At the age of 28, he suffered typhoid fever, and as a result moved to Phoenix, Arizona, to recover.

Fresno, California City in California, United States

Fresno is a city in California, United States, and the county seat of Fresno County. It covers about 112 square miles (290 km2) in the center of the San Joaquin Valley, the southern portion of California's Central Valley.

Placer County, California County in California, United States

Placer County, officially the County of Placer, is a county in the U.S. state of California. As of the 2010 census, the population was 348,432. The county seat is Auburn.

Typhoid fever A bacterial infectious disorder contracted by consumption of food or drink contaminated with Salmonella typhi. This disorder is common in developing countries and can be treated with antibiotics.

Typhoid fever, also known simply as typhoid, is a bacterial infection due to Salmonella typhi that causes symptoms. Symptoms may vary from mild to severe and usually begin six to thirty days after exposure. Often there is a gradual onset of a high fever over several days; weakness, abdominal pain, constipation, headaches, and mild vomiting also commonly occur. Some people develop a skin rash with rose colored spots. In severe cases there may be confusion. Without treatment, symptoms may last weeks or months. Diarrhea is uncommon. Other people may carry the bacterium without being affected; however, they are still able to spread the disease to others. Typhoid fever is a type of enteric fever, along with paratyphoid fever.

Career

In 1928, Webb began his namesake company which was a construction contractor. He received many military contracts during World War II, including the construction of the Poston War Relocation Center near Parker, Arizona. Poston interned over 17,000 Japanese-Americans and at the time was the third largest “city” in Arizona. Webb was associated with Howard Hughes and played golf with Hughes, Bing Crosby, Bob Hope, and Robert and Barry Goldwater.

Poston War Relocation Center Detainee camp in Arizona, United States

The Poston Internment Camp, located in Yuma County of southwestern Arizona, was the largest of the ten American concentration camps operated by the War Relocation Authority during World War II.

Howard Hughes American billionaire aviator, engineer, industrialist, and film producer

Howard Robard Hughes Jr. was an American business magnate, investor, record-setting pilot, engineer, film director, and philanthropist, known during his lifetime as one of the most financially successful individuals in the world. He first became prominent as a film producer, and then as an influential figure in the aviation industry. Later in life, he became known for his eccentric behavior and reclusive lifestyle—oddities that were caused in part by a worsening obsessive–compulsive disorder (OCD), chronic pain from a near-fatal plane crash, and increasing deafness.

Bing Crosby American singer and actor

Harry Lillis "Bing" Crosby was an American singer and actor. The first multimedia star, Crosby was a leader in record sales, radio ratings, and motion picture grosses from 1931 to 1954. His early career coincided with recording innovations that allowed him to develop an intimate singing style that influenced many male singers who followed him, including Perry Como, Frank Sinatra, Dick Haymes, and Dean Martin. Yank magazine said that he was "the person who had done the most for the morale of overseas servicemen" during World War II. In 1948, American polls declared him the "most admired man alive", ahead of Jackie Robinson and Pope Pius XII. Also in 1948, Music Digest estimated that his recordings filled more than half of the 80,000 weekly hours allocated to recorded radio music.

A lifelong baseball fan, in 1945, Webb and partners Dan Topping and Larry MacPhail purchased the New York Yankees for $2.8 million from the estate of Col. Jake Ruppert, Jr.. After buying out MacPhail in October 1947, Webb and Topping remained owners of the Yankees until selling the club to CBS in 1964.

Dan Topping American baseball executive

Daniel Reid Topping was a part owner and president of the New York Yankees baseball team from 1945 to 1964. Daniel Reid Topping was the son of Rhea Reid and Henry J. Topping. Rhea Reid, the daughter of Daniel G. Reid, known as the "Tinplate King" for his vast wealth in the tin industry, was the mother of three sons, Daniel Reid Topping, Henry J. Topping (1914), and John Reid Topping (1921). Daniel Topping, along with Del Webb and Larry MacPhail, purchased the Yankees for $2.8 million from the estate of Jacob Ruppert on January 25, 1945. MacPhail sold his share of the team to Topping and Webb in 1947, and the two sold controlling interest in the team to CBS in 1964, after which Topping remained as team president until 1966, when he sold his remaining stake in the Yankees.

Larry MacPhail American lawyer

Leland Stanford "Larry" MacPhail, Sr. was an American lawyer and an executive in Major League Baseball. He served as an executive with several professional baseball teams, including the Cincinnati Reds, Brooklyn Dodgers and New York Yankees. MacPhail's sons and grandsons were also sports executives. He was inducted into the National Baseball Hall of Fame in 1978.

United States dollar Currency of the United States of America

The United States dollar is the official currency of the United States and its territories per the United States Constitution since 1792. In practice, the dollar is divided into 100 smaller cent (¢) units, but is occasionally divided into 1000 mills (₥) for accounting. The circulating paper money consists of Federal Reserve Notes that are denominated in United States dollars.

In 1946 and 1947, Jewish American New York mob boss Benjamin "Bugsy" Siegel hired Webb as a construction foreman for the Flamingo Hotel and Casino in Las Vegas. After boasting about his claim that he'd personally killed some men, Siegel once said to Webb, "Del, don't worry, we only kill each other." [1] [2]

Bugsy Siegel American mobster

Benjamin "Bugsy" Siegel was an American mobster. Siegel was known as one of the most "infamous and feared gangsters of his day". Described as handsome and charismatic, he became one of the first front-page celebrity gangsters. He was also a driving force behind the development of the Las Vegas Strip. Siegel was not only influential within the Jewish mob but, like his friend and fellow gangster Meyer Lansky, he also held significant influence within the American Mafia and the largely Italian-Jewish National Crime Syndicate.

Flamingo Las Vegas casino hotel in Las Vegas, Nevada

Flamingo Las Vegas is a hotel and casino located on the Las Vegas Strip in Paradise, Nevada. It is owned and operated by Caesars Entertainment Corporation.

Las Vegas City in Nevada

Las Vegas, officially the City of Las Vegas and often known simply as Vegas, is the 28th-most populated city in the United States, the most populated city in the state of Nevada, and the county seat of Clark County. The city anchors the Las Vegas Valley metropolitan area and is the largest city within the greater Mojave Desert. Las Vegas is an internationally renowned major resort city, known primarily for its gambling, shopping, fine dining, entertainment, and nightlife. The Las Vegas Valley as a whole serves as the leading financial, commercial, and cultural center for Nevada.

In 1948, Webb was contracted to build 600 houses and a shopping center called Pueblo Gardens in Tucson, Arizona. San Manuel, Arizona followed. Established in 1953, the town was built by Webb (along with M.O.W. Homes Inc.) for The Magma Copper Company. It required the building of streets, shopping centers, schools, a hospital and parks. [3] [4] [5] This was a prelude to Sun City, Arizona, which was launched January 1, 1960, with five home models, a shopping center, recreation center and golf course. The opening weekend drew 100,000 people, ten times more than expected, and resulted in a Time magazine cover story. [6] In between these two projects, in 1951, Webb was given the huge contract to build the Hughes Missile Plant (now Raytheon) in Tucson, Arizona. [7]

Tucson, Arizona City in Arizona, United States

Tucson is a city and the county seat of Pima County, Arizona, United States, and home to the University of Arizona. The 2010 United States Census put the population at 520,116, while the 2015 estimated population of the entire Tucson metropolitan statistical area (MSA) was 980,263. The Tucson MSA forms part of the larger Tucson-Nogales combined statistical area (CSA), with a total population of 1,010,025 as of the 2010 Census. Tucson is the second-largest populated city in Arizona behind Phoenix, both of which anchor the Arizona Sun Corridor. The city is 108 miles (174 km) southeast of Phoenix and 60 mi (97 km) north of the U.S.–Mexico border. Tucson is the 33rd largest city and the 58th largest metropolitan area in the United States (2014).

San Manuel, Arizona CDP in Arizona, United States

San Manuel is a census-designated place (CDP) in Pinal County, Arizona, United States. The population was 3,551 at the 2010 census.

Time is an American weekly news magazine and news website published in New York City. It was founded in 1923 and originally run by Henry Luce. A European edition is published in London and also covers the Middle East, Africa, and, since 2003, Latin America. An Asian edition is based in Hong Kong. The South Pacific edition, which covers Australia, New Zealand, and the Pacific Islands, is based in Sydney. In December 2008, Time discontinued publishing a Canadian advertiser edition.

Webb also developed a chain of motor hotels under the “Hiway House” name, more "formal" hotels called "Del Webb's Towne House", and in addition to building the Flamingo for Siegel later owned his own casinos, the Sahara and The Mint in Las Vegas, and the Sahara Tahoe at Stateline, Nevada.[ citation needed ]

Death

Webb died at age 75 in Rochester, Minnesota at the Mayo Clinic, following surgery for lung cancer, less than two months after Topping’s death.

Legacy

Sun City, Arizona Del Webb Blvd. sign.jpg
Sun City, Arizona

Webb was portrayed by Andy Romano in the 1991 film Bugsy .[ citation needed ]

He was elected to the Gaming Hall of Fame in 2000. [8] The Del Webb Middle School, named in his honor, opened in Henderson, Nevada in 2005.

A charitable foundation named for him funds medical research in Nevada, Arizona and California.[ citation needed ]

One of the main thoroughfares in Sun City, Arizona is named "Del Webb Boulevard."

Personal life

In 1919, Webb married his childhood sweetheart, Hazel Lenora Church. They divorced in 1952. In 1961, Webb married Toni Ince (aged 41), a buyer for Bullock's-Wilshire department store in Los Angeles. [9] Toni Ince Webb (January 24, 1921 – July 10, 2008) lived in Beverly Hills, California until her death.

See also

Related Research Articles

Las Vegas Valley Metropolitan area in Nevada

The Las Vegas Valley is a major metropolitan area in the southern part of the U.S. state of Nevada. The state's largest urban agglomeration, it is the heart of the Las Vegas–Paradise-Henderson, NV MSA. The Valley is largely defined by the Las Vegas Valley landform, a 600 sq mi (1,600 km2) basin area surrounded by mountains to the north, south, east and west of the metropolitan area. The Valley is home to the three largest incorporated cities in Nevada: Las Vegas, Henderson and North Las Vegas. Five unincorporated towns governed by the Clark County government are part of the Las Vegas Township and constitute the largest community in the state of Nevada.

Interstate 11 (I-11) is a north-south Interstate Highway tentatively planned to run from Nogales, Arizona, to Reno, Nevada, along the current routes of I-19, I-10, US 93 and US 95. Currently, the only open section of I-11 is a 22.845-mile-long (36.765 km) freeway running predominantly northwest-southeast in the U.S. state of Nevada that currently follows U.S. Route 93 (US 93) and U.S. Route 95 (US 95) between the Arizona state line and Henderson. The bulk of the route is still in the early discussion and planning stages. Except for the portion between Wickenburg, Arizona to Hoover Dam, which will run on an upgraded US 93, an exact route for I-11 has yet to be determined. A number of corridor alternatives have been identified for further study and refinement.

This history of Las Vegas covers both the city of Las Vegas, Nevada, and the Las Vegas Valley.

Hank Greenspun American publisher, real estate developer

Herman Milton "Hank" Greenspun was the publisher of the Las Vegas Sun newspaper. He purchased the Sun in 1949, and served as its editor and publisher until his death. Greenspun was also a prominent real estate developer in the Las Vegas Valley.

David Berman (1903–1957), nicknamed "Davie the Jew", was a Jewish-American organized crime figure in Iowa, New York City, Minneapolis, and Las Vegas. He was one of the pioneers of gambling in Las Vegas, where he was a partner with flamboyant mobster Bugsy Siegel at the Flamingo Hotel. Berman died a non-violent death in 1957 during surgery.

Morris Greene is a fictional character appearing in Mario Puzo's 1969 novel The Godfather and the 1972 movie of the same name. The character's name is a composite of real Las Vegas mobsters Moe Dalitz, or possibly Moe Sedway, and Gus Greenbaum. However, both Greene's character and personality are actually based on Bugsy Siegel: his affiliation with the mob in Los Angeles, his involvement in the development of Las Vegas, and his flamboyant tendencies. Greene is portrayed in the movie by Alex Rocco.

John Davis Gaughan, Sr. was a casino owner and operator from the early 1950s in Las Vegas, Nevada. He had an ownership stake in many casinos throughout his career, but he is best known for his ownership of the El Cortez, where he resided until his death on March 12, 2014. At one time Gaughan reportedly owned more than 25 percent of the available real estate in Downtown Las Vegas.

El Cortez (Las Vegas) hotel and casino in Las Vegas, Nevada

El Cortez, a hotel and casino, is a relatively small downtown Las Vegas gaming venue a block from the Fremont Street Experience and Las Vegas Boulevard. Slots, table games, and a race and sports book occupy one floor of the main pavilion. It is one of the older casino-hotel properties in Las Vegas having continuously operated at the same Fremont Street location since 1941. Primarily Spanish Colonial Revival in style, it reflects a 1952 remodel when the façade was modernized. On February 22, 2013, the structure was placed on the National Register of Historic Places.

Bonanza Air Lines

Bonanza Air Lines was an airline in the Western United States from 1945 until it merged with two other local service airlines to form Air West in 1968. Its headquarters was initially Las Vegas, Nevada and moved to Phoenix, Arizona in 1966.

Martin Stern Jr. American architect

Martin Stern Jr. was an American architect who was most widely known for his large scale designs and structures in Las Vegas, Nevada. He is credited with originating the concept of the structurally integrated casino resort complex in Las Vegas.

Gus Greenbaum was an American businessman in the casino industry, best known for taking over management of the Flamingo Hotel in Las Vegas after the murder of co-founder Bugsy Siegel.

Tuscany Suites and Casino Hotel and casino in Nevada

Tuscany Suites and Casino is an all-suite hotel and casino situated on 27 acres (11 ha) in Paradise, Nevada. The hotel opened in 2001, while the casino opened in 2003.

The Siegel Group, Inc. is a diverse company based in Paradise, Nevada and Studio City, California. It owns and operates boutique hotels, hotel casinos, restaurants, apartments, bars, office buildings, retail franchises and shopping centers.

Moe Sedway American mobster

Moe Sedway (1894–1952) was a Jewish-American businessman and mobster. He was an associate of Bugsy Siegel and a faithful lieutenant of organized crime czar Meyer Lansky. He and Gus Greenbaum made the Flamingo Hotel & Casino in Las Vegas very successful after Siegel's murder.

Del E. Webb Construction Company

The Del E. Webb Construction Company was a construction company, that was founded in 1928 and developed by Del Webb and headquartered in Phoenix, Arizona in the United States. It became the Del E. Webb Corporation in 1960. That same year, the corporation unveiled Sun City outside of Phoenix as the first community designed for senior citizens. Many more Sun Cities were built by the corporation in the following decades. Along with construction, the corporation was also involved in real estate and owned several properties mainly hotels and casinos, many of which were built and/or expanded by the company. The company was purchased in 2001 by Pulte Homes. Pulte Homes since merged with Centex Corp. and is now PulteGroup. Del Webb continues as a brand of PulteGroup.

Las Vegas in the 1940s

Las Vegas in the 1940s was notable for the establishment of The Strip in a town which "combined Wild West frontier friendliness with glamor and excitement". In 1940, the population was 8,400 but within five years, it more than doubled its size. The Las Vegas Valley had a population of 13,937 in 1940, increasing to 35,000 in just two years.

The Cohen crime syndicate, or the Siegel crime syndicate, was an Italian-American Mafia / Jewish Mafia crime family created by New York Jewish American mobster Benjamin "Bugsy" Siegel in the early 1930s. Siegel ran Los Angeles and later Las Vegas' illegal gambling and prostitution rings with his lieutenants Mickey Cohen, David Berman, Harold "Hooky" Rothman, Moe Sedway and boss of the L.A. family Jack Dragna.

References

  1. Jennings, We Only Kill Each Other. (1992). p. 17
  2. The Green Felt Jungle
  3. "Del Webb Corporation History" . Retrieved 28 December 2017.
  4. "Mine Tales: San Manuel was once world's largest underground copper mine". Apr 14, 2014. Retrieved 28 December 2017.
  5. "History of the San Manuel-Kalamazoo Mine, Pinal County, Arizona" (PDF). Retrieved 29 December 2017.
  6. Trolander, Judith Ann (2011). "Age 55 or Better: Active Adult Communities and City Planning". Journal of Urban History. 37 (6): 952–974. doi:10.1177/0096144211418435.
  7. David Leighton, The History of the Hughes Missile Plant in Tucson, 1947-1960, Private Publication, 2015 [Page 5]
  8. "The Gaming Hall of Fame". University of Nevada Las Vegas. Retrieved August 30, 2009.
  9. "Modern Living: Man on the Cover: Del Webb". Time. August 3, 1962. Retrieved May 13, 2012.