Denis John Boocker

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Denis Boocker
Denis John Boocker.jpg
Personal information
Full nameDenis John Boocker
Born(1922-01-04)4 January 1922
Ystrad, Wales
Died8 June 1987(1987-06-08) (aged 65)
Kurri Kurri, New South Wales, Australia
Playing information
Position Wing, Centre
Club
YearsTeamPldTGFGP
Kurri Kurri
1946 Newtown 13100030
1947–54 Wakefield Trinity 221127160393
Total234137160423
Representative
YearsTeamPldTGFGP
1945–47 Country NSW ≥2
1948–50 Wales 50000
Source: [1]

Denis John Boocker (4 January 1922 [2] – 8 June 1987), also known by the nickname of "Dinny", was a Welsh professional rugby league footballer who played in the 1940s and 1950s. He played at representative level for Wales and Country New South Wales (Australia), and at club level for Kurri Kurri Bulldogs , Newtown Bluebags and Wakefield Trinity (Heritage № 563), as a wing, or centre, i.e. number 2 or 5, or, 3 or 4. [1] [3] [4]

Contents

Background

Denis Boocker was born in Ystrad, Wales (birth registered in Pontypridd district), and he died aged 65 in Kurri Kurri, Australia.

Boocker played in Kurri Kurri's 1945 premiership win. In 2010 he was named at centre in Kurri Rugby League Club's team of the century. [5]

Playing career

International honours

Denis John Boocker was selected for Wales whilst at Wakefield Trinity during the 1948/49 and 1949/50 seasons. [1] [6]

County Cup Final appearances

Denis John Boocker played left-centre, i.e. number 4, in Wakefield Trinity's 7–7 draw with Leeds in the 1947 Yorkshire County Cup Final during the 1947–48 season at Fartown Ground, Huddersfield on Saturday 1 November 1947, played left-centre, i.e. number 4, in Wakefield Trinity's 8–7 victory over Leeds in the 1947 Yorkshire County Cup Final replay during the 1947–48 season at Odsal Stadium, Bradford on Wednesday 5 November 1947, and played left wing, i.e. number 5, in the 17–3 victory over Keighley in the 1951 Yorkshire County Cup Final during the 1951–52 season at Fartown Ground, Huddersfield on Saturday 27 October 1951. [7]

Club career

Denis John Boocker made his début for Wakefield Trinity, and scored a try in the 15–8 victory over Salford at Belle Vue, Wakefield on Saturday 25 October 1947, he is second on Wakefield Trinity's all-time tries scored in a season list, scoring 32-tries in 1953–54 Northern Rugby Football League season, a record later extended to 38-tries by Fred Smith and David Smith, he appears to have scored no drop-goals (or field-goals as they are currently known in Australasia), but prior to the 1974–75 season all goals, whether; conversions, penalties, or drop-goals, scored 2-points, consequently prior to this date drop-goals were often not explicitly documented, therefore '0' drop-goals may indicate drop-goals not recorded, rather than no drop-goals scored. In addition, prior to the 1949–50 season, the archaic field-goal was also still a valid means of scoring points.

Contemporaneous Article Extract

A typical action picture of Denis Boocker taken during Trinity's game with Belle Vue Rangers in August 1935, when the Welsh-Australian scored four tries. It shows the famous "swallow-dive" which Boocker used so effectively on many of his try-scoring occasions. Born in Gelli, Wales, Booker emigrated to Australia two years later. Commenced his football career with Karri-Karri (sic) at seventeen. After four years in the Forces he joined the Newtown Club from where Trinity signed him in 1947. He made his début for Trinity on 25 October 1947, against Salford at Belle Vue. After a period as centre-threequarter he tried the wing position and soon proved himself one of the best in the game. Made five appearances for Wales, including one against Australia. Extended the club try-scoring record just prior to his return "down under" in April 1954 – and he left in Wakefield many friends and exciting memories. [6]

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References

Note: "Boocker" is mis-spelt as "Booker", i.e. without the 'c', on Page-78 of the book 'Wakefield Trinity RLFC - FIFTY GREAT GAMES'.

  1. 1 2 3 "Statistics at rugbyleagueproject.org". rugbyleagueproject.org. 31 December 2017. Retrieved 1 January 2018.
  2. "Birth details at freebmd.org.uk". freebmd.org.uk. 31 December 2010. Retrieved 1 January 2012.
  3. Williams, Graham; Lush, Peter; Farrar, David (2009). The British Rugby League Records Book. London League. pp. 108–114. ISBN   978-1-903659-49-6.
  4. "Statistics at rugbyleague.wales". rugbyleague.wales. 31 December 2019. Retrieved 1 January 2020.
  5. cessnockadvertiser.com.au (22 August 2012). "Kurri Bulldogs Honour Their Top Side". The Advertiser. Retrieved 1 January 2014.
  6. 1 2 Lindley, John (1960). Dreadnoughts - A HISTORY OF Wakefield Trinity F. C. 1873–1960 [Pages 46 & 51]. John Lindley Son & Co Ltd. ISBN n/a
  7. Hoole, Les (2004). Wakefield Trinity RLFC - FIFTY GREAT GAMES. Breedon Books. ISBN   1-85983-429-9