Dennit Morris

Last updated
Dennit Morris
Dennit Morris 1961.jpg
Position: LB
Personal information
Born:(1936-04-15)April 15, 1936
Hanna, Oklahoma
Died:April 28, 2014(2014-04-28) (aged 78)
Career information
College: Oklahoma
NFL Draft: 1958  / Round: 18 / Pick: 215
Career history
Career highlights and awards
Player stats at PFR

Dennit Morris (April 15, 1936  April 28, 2014) was an American football linebacker who played three seasons in the National Football League (NFL) and American Football League (AFL). He played on two college national championship and two AFL championship teams. [1]

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References

  1. "Likes to Block: Sooner Fullback Doesn't Care to Run". The Milwaukee Journal . AP. Oct 1, 1957. p. 28. Retrieved 2010-07-22.

See also