Deputy Prime Minister of Vietnam

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Deputy Prime Minister of the
Socialist Republic of Vietnam
Phó Thủ tướng Chính phủ nước Cộng hòa Xã hội chủ nghĩa Việt Nam
Emblem of Vietnam.svg
Style The Honourable
Member of Government of Vietnam
Reports to Prime Minister
Seat Hanoi, Vietnam
AppointerThe Prime Minister
Term length No fixed restrictions
Inaugural holder Nguyễn Hải Thần
Formation27 September 1945
Emblem of Vietnam.svg
This article is part of a series on the
politics and government of
Vietnam
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The Deputy Prime Minister of the Socialist Republic of Vietnam (Vietnamese : Phó Thủ tướng Cộng hòa xã hội chủ nghĩa Việt Nam), known as Deputy Chairman of the Council of Ministers (Vietnamese : Phó Chủ tịch Hội đồng Bộ trưởng) from 1981 to 1992, is one of the highest offices within the Central Government. The deputy prime minister has throughout its history been responsible for helping the prime minister to handle Vietnam's internal policies. Since Vietnam is a one-party state, with the Communist Party of Vietnam being the sole party allowed by the constitution, all the deputy prime ministers of the Democratic Republic and the Socialist Republic have been members of the party while holding office. There are currently five deputy prime ministers; Trương Hòa Bình, Phạm Bình Minh, Vũ Đức Đam, Vương Đình Huệ, and Trịnh Đình Dũng.

Vietnamese language official and national language of Vietnam

Vietnamese is an Austroasiatic language that originated in Vietnam, where it is the national and official language. It is the native language of the Vietnamese (Kinh) people, as well as a first or second language for the many ethnic minorities of Vietnam. As a result of Vietnamese emigration and cultural influence, Vietnamese speakers are found throughout the world, notably in East and Southeast Asia, North America, Australia and Western Europe. Vietnamese has also been officially recognized as a minority language in the Czech Republic.

Government of Vietnam executive arm of Vietnam

The Government of the Socialist Republic of Vietnam is the executive arm of the Vietnamese state, and the members of the Government are elected by the National Assembly of Vietnam.

Prime Minister of Vietnam Head of Government of Vietnam

The Prime Minister of Vietnam, officially styled Prime Minister of the Government of the Socialist Republic, is the head of government of Vietnam who presides over the meetings of the Central Government. The prime minister directs the work of government members, and may propose deputy prime ministers to the National Assembly.

Contents

The Permanent Deputy Prime Minister of the Socialist Republic of Vietnam, known as The First Deputy Prime Minister (Vietnamese : Phó Thủ tướng Thường trực Cộng hòa xã hội chủ nghĩa Việt Nam), is a member of the Central Government and a member of the Politburo. The Permanent Deputy Prime Minister (1st) is elected and determined by the Prime Minister.

Politburo of the Communist Party of Vietnam

The Political Bureau (Politburo) of the Central Committee Communist Party of Vietnam, formerly the Standing Committee of the Central Committee from 1930 to 1951, is the highest body of the Communist Party of Vietnam (CPV) between Central Committee meetings, which are held at least twice a year. According to Party rules, the Politburo directs the general orientation of the government and enacts policies which have been approved by either the National Party Congress or the Central Committee.

Deputy Prime Ministers of the Democratic Republic of Vietnam (1945–1976)

No.
[note 2]
Rank
[note 3]
Name
(birth–death)
PortraitTook officeLeft office Prime Minister
11
Nguyễn Hải Thần
(1878–1958)
27 September 19451 June 1946 Hồ Chí Minh
226 Phạm Văn Đồng
(1906–2000)
PhamVanDong1954.jpg 25 June 194720 September 1955 Hồ Chí Minh
33
Phan Kế Toại
(1892–1973)
20 September 19556 June 1973 Phạm Văn Đồng
445 Võ Nguyên Giáp
(1911–2013)
Vo Nguyen Giap 1951.jpg 20 September 19552 July 1976 Phạm Văn Đồng
7
552 Trường Chinh
(1907–1988)
TruongChinh1955.jpg April 195810 June 1960 Phạm Văn Đồng
6611 Phạm Hùng
(1912–1988)
April 195810 June 1971 Phạm Văn Đồng
5
7710 Nguyễn Duy Trinh
(1910–1985)
15 June 19602 July 1976 Phạm Văn Đồng
9
8812 Lê Thanh Nghị
(1911–1989)
15 June 19602 July 1976 Phạm Văn Đồng
10
99
Nguyễn Côn
(born 1917)
November 19672 July 1976 Phạm Văn Đồng
1010
Đỗ Mười
(1917–2018)
Do Muoi cropped.jpg December 19692 July 1976 Phạm Văn Đồng
1111
Hoàng Anh
(1912–2016)
April 19712 July 1976 Phạm Văn Đồng
1212
Trần Hữu Dực
(1910–1993)
March 19742 July 1976 Phạm Văn Đồng
1313
Phan Trọng Tuệ
(1917–1991)
March 19742 July 1976 Phạm Văn Đồng
1414
Đặng Việt Châu
(1914–1987)
March 19742 July 1976 Phạm Văn Đồng

Deputy Prime Ministers of the Republic of South Vietnam (1969–1976)

No.
[note 2]
Name
(birth–death)
PortraitTook officeLeft office Prime Minister
1 Phùng Văn Cung
(1909–1987)
6 June 19692 July 1976 Huỳnh Tấn Phát
2 Nguyễn Văn Kiết
(1906–1987)
6 June 19692 July 1976 Huỳnh Tấn Phát
3 Nguyễn Đóa
(1896–1993)
6 June 19692 July 1976 Huỳnh Tấn Phát
4 Trịnh Đình Thảo
(1901–1986)
6 June 19692 July 1976 Huỳnh Tấn Phát

Deputy Prime Ministers of the Socialist Republic of Vietnam (1976–present)

No.
[note 2]
Rank
[note 3]
Name
(birth–death)
PortraitTook officeLeft office Prime Minister
137 Võ Nguyên Giáp
(1911–2013)
Vo Nguyen Giap 1951.jpg 2 July 19768 August 1991 Phạm Văn Đồng
6
Phạm Hùng
Đỗ Mười
265 Phạm Hùng
(1912–1988)
2 July 197622 June 1987 Phạm Văn Đồng
4
2
3810 Lê Thanh Nghị
(1911–89)
2 July 19764 July 1981 Phạm Văn Đồng
8
41017 Đỗ Mười
(1917–2018)
Do Muoi cropped.jpg 2 July 197622 June 1987 Phạm Văn Đồng
11
4
Phạm Hùng
515
Huỳnh Tấn Phát
(1913–1989)
2 July 1976June 1982 Phạm Văn Đồng
61613 Võ Chí Công
(1912–2011)
2 July 1976April 1982 Phạm Văn Đồng
7
71715 Tố Hữu
(1920–2002)
February 1980June 1986 Phạm Văn Đồng
9
818
Nguyễn Lam
(1922–1990)
February 1980April 1982 Phạm Văn Đồng
919
Trần Quỳnh
(1920–2005)
January 1981February 1987 Phạm Văn Đồng
102010 Võ Văn Kiệt
(1922–2008)
Vo Van Kiet.jpg April 19828 August 1991 Phạm Văn Đồng
5
Phạm Hùng
Đỗ Mười
3 Đỗ Mười
112116 Đồng Sỹ Nguyên
(1923–2019)
April 19828 August 1991 Phạm Văn Đồng
9
Phạm Hùng
Đỗ Mười
Đỗ Mười
1222
Vũ Đình Liệu
(1918–2005)
April 1982February 1987 Phạm Văn Đồng
1323
Trần Phương
(born 1927)
April 1982February 1987 Phạm Văn Đồng
6163 Võ Chí Công
(1912–2011)
27 June 198622 June 1987 Phạm Văn Đồng
14248 Nguyễn Cơ Thạch
(1921–1998)
Nguyen Co Thach 1976.jpg February 19878 August 1991 Phạm Văn Đồng
Phạm Hùng
Đỗ Mười
Đỗ Mười
1525
Nguyễn Ngọc Trìu
(born 1926)
February 1987May 1988 Phạm Văn Đồng
Phạm Hùng
1626
Trần Đức Lương
(born 1936)
Tran Duc Luong, Nov 17, 2004.jpg February 198729 September 1997 Phạm Văn Đồng
Phạm Hùng
Đỗ Mười
Võ Văn Kiệt
12
Phan Văn Khải
1727
Nguyễn Khánh
(born 1928)
February 198729 September 1997 Phạm Văn Đồng
Phạm Hùng
Đỗ Mười
Võ Văn Kiệt
Võ Văn Kiệt
Phan Văn Khải
1828
Đoàn Duy Thành
(born 1929)
February 1987May 1988 Phạm Văn Đồng
Phạm Hùng
1929
Nguyễn Văn Chính
(1924—2016)
February 1987May 1988 Phạm Văn Đồng
Phạm Hùng
2030
Phan Văn Khải
(1933–2018)
8 August 199129 September 1997 Đỗ Mười
Võ Văn Kiệt
8 Võ Văn Kiệt
7
3
213115 Nguyễn Tấn Dũng
(born 1949)
29 September 199727 June 2006 Phan Văn Khải
5
4
22328 Nguyễn Mạnh Cầm
(born 1929)
Nguyen Manh Cam detail, 981001-D-9880W-006.jpg 29 September 199712 August 2002 Phan Văn Khải
2333
Nguyễn Công Tạn
(1935–2014)
29 September 199712 August 2002 Phan Văn Khải
2434
Ngô Xuân Lộc
(born 1940)
29 September 199711 December 1999 Phan Văn Khải
2535
Phạm Gia Khiêm
(born 1944)
Pham Gia Khiem 070316-D-9880W-018 0VFJ9.jpg 29 September 19973 August 2011 Phan Văn Khải
Nguyễn Tấn Dũng
7 Nguyễn Tấn Dũng
2636
Vũ Khoan
(born 1937)
Vu Khoan 2005.jpg 12 August 200227 June 2006 Phan Văn Khải
2737
Nguyễn Sinh Hùng
(born 1946)
Nguyen Sinh Hung.jpg 28 June 200625 July 2011 Nguyễn Tấn Dũng
28389 Trương Vĩnh Trọng
(born 1942)
Truong Vinh Trong, June 2011-1 (cropped).jpg 28 June 200619 January 2012 Nguyễn Tấn Dũng
2939
Hoàng Trung Hải
(born 1959)
Hoang Trung Hai 2009.jpg 2 August 20078 April 2016 Nguyễn Tấn Dũng
3040
Nguyễn Thiện Nhân
(born 1953)
Nguyen Thien Nhan 2.jpg 2 August 200711 November 2013 Nguyễn Tấn Dũng
31413 Nguyễn Xuân Phúc
(born 1954)
2 August 20117 April 2016 Nguyễn Tấn Dũng
6
3242
Vũ Văn Ninh
(born 1955)
Vu Van Ninh (cropped).jpg 2 August 20118 April 2016 Nguyễn Tấn Dũng
3343
Phạm Bình Minh
(born 1959)
13 November 2013Incumbent Nguyễn Tấn Dũng
13 Nguyễn Xuân Phúc
3444
Vũ Đức Đam
(born 1963)
Vu Duc Dam, August 2015 (cropped).jpg 13 November 2013Incumbent Nguyễn Tấn Dũng
Nguyễn Xuân Phúc
354511 Vương Đình Huệ
(born 1957)
Vuong Dinh Hue.jpg 9 April 2016Incumbent Nguyễn Xuân Phúc
364615 Trương Hòa Bình
(born 1955)
9 April 2016Incumbent Nguyễn Xuân Phúc
3747
Trịnh Đình Dũng
(born 1956)
9 April 2016Incumbent Nguyễn Xuân Phúc

See also

Vice President of Vietnam

The Vice President of the Socialist Republic of Vietnam, known as Deputy Chairman of the Council of State from 1981 to 1992, is the vice head of state of the Socialist Republic of Vietnam. The Vice President is appointed on the recommendation of the President to the National Assembly. The president can also recommend the vice president's dismissal and resignation from office. Upon the President's recommendation, the Vice President has to be approved by the National Assembly. The main duty of a Vice President is to help the President in discharging his duties – in certain cases, the Vice President can be empowered by the president to replace him in the discharge of some of his duties. If the president can't discharge of his duties, the Vice President becomes acting president. In case of vacancy, the vice president will remain acting president until the National Assembly elects a new president.

Notes

1. ^ The Politburo of the Central Committee is the highest decision-making body of the CPV and the Central Government. The membership composition, and the order of rank of the individual Politburo members is decided in an election within the newly formed Central Committee in the aftermath of a Party Congress. [1] The Central Committee can overrule the Politburo, but that does not happen often. [2]
2. ^ These numbers are official. The "—" denotes acting deputy prime minister. The first column shows how many deputy prime ministers there have been in Vietnamese history, while the second show how many deputy prime ministers there was in that state.
3. ^ The Central Committee when it convenes for its first session after being elected by a National Party Congress elects the Politburo. [1] According to David Koh, in interviews with several high-standing Vietnamese officials, the Politburo ranking is based upon the number of approval votes by the Central Committee. Lê Hồng Anh, the Minister of Public Security, was ranked 2nd in the 10th Politburo because he received the second-highest number of approval votes. Another example being Tô Huy Rứa of the 10th Politburo, he was ranked lowest because he received the lowest approval vote of the 10th Central Committee when he standing for election for a seat in the Politburo. This system was implemented at the 1st plenum of the 10th Central Committee. [3] The Politburo ranking functioned as an official order of precedence before the 10th Party Congress, and some believe it still does. [1]

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References

  1. 1 2 3 Van & Cooper 1983, p. 69.
  2. Abuza, Zachary (2002). "The Lessons of Le Kha Phieu: Changing Rules in Vietnamese politics" (PDF). Contemporary Southeast Asia. 24 (1): 121–45. doi:10.1355/CS24-1H . Retrieved 27 February 2015.
  3. Koh 2008, p. 666.

Bibliography

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