Desko Mountains

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Coordinates: 69°37′S72°23′W / 69.617°S 72.383°W / -69.617; -72.383 The Desko Mountains are a west-northwest–east-southeast mountain range on Rothschild Island, off northwest Alexander Island. The mountain range spans 20 nautical miles (37 km) from Bates Peak to Overton Peak and rises to about 1,000 metres (3,300 ft) at Enigma Peak, Fournier Ridge. [1]

Contents


Geographical context

Other mountains nearby are Goward Peak, Schenck Peak, Morrill Peak and Thuma Peak. [2] [3]

To the east lies Lazarev Bay, a rectangular bay that separates the east side of Rothschild Island from the north-west coast of Alexander Island.

Antarctic Peninsula's tectonic movement Antarctic Peninsula Cross Section.jpg
Antarctic Peninsula's tectonic movement

Exploration

The mountains were seen (in part) from a distance by F. Bellingshausen in 1821, and by Jean-Baptiste Charcot in 1909, but the nature of the feature remained obscure.

The Desko mountain range was photographed from the air by U.S. Navy Operation Highjump and the Ronne Antarctic Research Expedition in 1947. The mountain range was further mapped by air by D. Searle of the Falkland Islands Dependencies Survey in 1960. The mountain range was further mapped by the U.S. Navy in 1966, and with Landsat imagery since 1975.

The island was named by the Advisory Committee on Antarctic Names for Commander Daniel A. Desko, U.S. Navy, Commanding Officer, Squadron VXE-6, Operation Deep Freeze, 1977, and LC-130 aircraft commander, 1976. [1]

See also

Further reading

• Damien Gildea, Antarctic Peninsula - Mountaineering in Antarctica: Travel Guide

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Bates Peak, about 600 metres (2,000 ft) high, is the westernmost peak on Rothschild Island, rising west of Fournier Ridge in the Desko Mountains. It was named by the Advisory Committee on Antarctic Names for Commander Lawrence O. Bates, U.S. Coast Guard, Executive Officer on USCGC Edisto during U.S. Navy Operation Deep Freeze, 1969.

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Morrill Peak is a sharp-pointed peak, about 550 metres (1,800 ft) high, in the Desko Mountains, rising 2 nautical miles (4 km) west-northwest of Thuma Peak in southeast Rothschild Island, Antarctica. It was named by the Advisory Committee on Antarctic Names for Captain Peter A. Morrill, U.S. Coast Guard, Executive Officer on USCGC Westwind in U.S. Navy Operation Deep Freeze 1967 and 1968.

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References

  1. 1 2 "Desko Mountains". Geographic Names Information System . United States Geological Survey . Retrieved 2012-01-13.
  2. "Desko Mountains". Archived from the original on 2012-03-01. Retrieved 2019-12-19.
  3. "Gazetteer - Name details - Desko Mountains". AADC. Retrieved 2019-12-19.

PD-icon.svg This article incorporates  public domain material from the United States Geological Survey document: "Desko Mountains".(content from the Geographic Names Information System )