Desmond Clarke

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Desmond M. Clarke (17 January 1942 – 17 September 2016) was an author and professor of philosophy at University College Cork, in Cork, Ireland. His research interests lay predominantly in the 17th century, on such topics as the history of philosophy and theories of science - with a specific interest in the writings of René Descartes, as well as contemporary church/state relations, human rights, and nationalism. He was co-editor of the Cambridge Texts in the History of Philosophy series, and he has translated and written an introduction for the Penguin edition of Descartes' Meditations on First Philosophy . He retired from his position as Professor of Philosophy in 2006. [1]

University College Cork university college

University College Cork – National University of Ireland, Cork (UCC) is a constituent university of the National University of Ireland, and located in Cork.

Cork (city) City in Munster, Ireland

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René Descartes 17th-century French philosopher, mathematician, and scientist

René Descartes was a French philosopher, mathematician, and scientist. A native of the Kingdom of France, he spent about 20 years (1629–1649) of his life in the Dutch Republic after serving for a while in the Dutch States Army of Maurice of Nassau, Prince of Orange and the Stadtholder of the United Provinces. One of the most notable intellectual figures of the Dutch Golden Age, Descartes is also widely regarded as one of the founders of modern philosophy.

Clarke was the founder and a general editor of Cambridge Texts in the History of Philosophy – 76 volumes have been published with new translations of non-English texts from ancient Greek, Latin, Arabic, Hebrew, French, Italian and German. He died on 17 September 2016. [2]

Publications

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References

  1. "Desmond Clarke staff page at UCC". University College Cork. Retrieved 2011-02-03.
  2. "Desmond M Clarke: Fearless philosopher and distinguished scholar" . Retrieved 2016-09-18.
  3. Karen Detlefsen, University of Pennsylvania (2006-11-08). "Desmond M. Clarke: Descartes - a Biography". Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews. Retrieved 2011-02-03.