Desmond Dickinson

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Desmond Evelyn Otho Cockburn Dickinson B.S.C. (1902–1986) was a British cinematographer. [1]

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He was cinematographer on Such Is the Law (1930). He directed Detective Lloyd (1932), notable as Britain's only talkie serial. During World War II he made morale boosting documentaries. He worked on Laurence Olivier's version of Hamlet (1948).

Selected filmography

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References

  1. allmovie ((( Desmond Dickinson > Overview )))