Deutscher Science Fiction Preis

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Deutscher Science Fiction Preis is a German literary award. Together with the Kurd-Laßwitz-Preis, it is one of the most prestigious awards for German science fiction literature. The award was established in 1985 by the Science Fiction Club Deutschland  [ de ], a German Science Fiction society. Each year, the award is given to the best German science fiction short story and the best German novel from the previous year.

Germany Federal parliamentary republic in central-western Europe

Germany, officially the Federal Republic of Germany, is a country in Central and Western Europe, lying between the Baltic and North Seas to the north, and the Alps to the south. It borders Denmark to the north, Poland and the Czech Republic to the east, Austria and Switzerland to the south, France to the southwest, and Luxembourg, Belgium and the Netherlands to the west.

Contents

Winners

Best Novel

Herbert W. Franke is an Austrian scientist and writer. Die Zeit calls him "the most prominent German writing Science Fiction author". He is also active in the fields of future research, speleology as well as computer graphics and digital art.

Gudrun Pausewang German writer

Gudrun Pausewang is a German writer for children and teens. She is also noted in science fiction for young adult novels such as The Last Children of Schewenborn.

Christian Mähr is an Austrian chemist and science fiction writer. His novel Fatous Staub concerns parallel worlds, computers, and the mathematical work of Pierre Fatou. It won the Deutscher Science Fiction Preis and the Kurd-Laßwitz-Preis for 1992.

Best Short Story

Wolfgang Jeschke writer, editor

Wolfgang Jeschke was a German sci-fi author and editor at Heyne Verlag. In 1987, he won the Harrison Award for international achievements in science fiction.

Gert Prokop was a German writer of science fiction and crime fiction. He spent much of his life in the former East Germany. In crime fiction one of his best known works is "Detective Pinky" about an American boy who dreams of being like Allan Pinkerton and at least one of his crime novels was filmed. His science fiction made use of social criticism and dystopian forms. In 1990 he has won the Deutscher Science Fiction Preis.

Andreas Findig was a writer who won a Deutscher Science Fiction Preis for the short story Gödel geht. He died on 6 May 2018 aged 56.

See also

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References

  1. 1 2 "Deutscher Science Fiction Preis 2015: Gewinner stehen fest". 10 May 2015. Retrieved 8 August 2015.
  2. 1 2 "Deutscher Science Fiction Preis: Die Preisträger". 26 June 2017. Retrieved 26 June 2017.
  3. 1 2 "Deutscher Science Fiction Preis DSFP 2017: Die Gewinner". 23 April 2017. Retrieved 26 June 2017.