Dewey Jackson Short

Last updated
Dewey Jackson Short
DeweyJacksonShort.jpg
Assistant Secretary of the Army for Civil-Military Affairs
In office
March 15, 1957 November 1958
President Dwight D. Eisenhower
Preceded by George H. Roderick
Succeeded byOffice abolished
Chairman of the House Armed Services Committee
In office
January 3, 1953 January 3, 1955
Speaker Joseph William Martin, Jr.
Preceded by Carl Vinson
Succeeded by Carl Vinson
Member of the U.S.HouseofRepresentatives
from Missouri's 7th district
In office
January 3, 1935 January 3, 1957
Preceded byDistrict inactive
Succeeded by Charles H. Brown
Member of the U.S.HouseofRepresentatives
from Missouri's 14th district
In office
March 4, 1929 March 3, 1931
Preceded by James F. Fulbright
Succeeded by James F. Fulbright
Personal details
Born(1898-04-07)April 7, 1898
Galena, Missouri
DiedNovember 19, 1979(1979-11-19) (aged 81)
Washington, DC
NationalityAmerican
Political party Republican

Dewey Jackson Short (April 7, 1898 – November 19, 1979) was a Republican U.S. Representative from Missouri's 7th congressional district for 12 terms and a staunch opponent of President Franklin Delano Roosevelt's New Deal.

Republican Party (United States) political party in the United States

The Republican Party, also referred to as the GOP, is one of the two major political parties in the United States; the other is its historic rival, the Democratic Party.

Missouris 7th congressional district

Missouri's 7th congressional district consists of Southwest Missouri. The district includes Springfield, the home of Missouri State University, and the popular tourist destination city of Branson. Located along the borders of Kansas, Oklahoma, and Northwest Arkansas, the district occupies part of the Bible Belt with a strong socially conservative trend. George W. Bush defeated John Kerry here 67% to 32% in the 2004 election. Republican John McCain defeated Democrat Barack Obama 63.1% to 35.3% in the 2008 election. Republican and Former Massachusetts Governor Mitt Romney defeated Barack Obama 67.6% to 30.3% in the 2012 election. In the 2016 election, Republican Donald Trump defeated Democrat Hillary Clinton 70.4% to 24.7%. As of 2017, this district is the second most strongly Republican district in Missouri and is one of the most strongly Republican Districts in the United States.

New Deal Economic programs of U.S. president Franklin D. Roosevelt

The New Deal was a series of programs, public work projects, financial reforms, and regulations enacted by President Franklin D. Roosevelt in the United States between 1933 and 1936. It responded to needs for relief, reform, and recovery from the Great Depression. Major federal programs included the Civilian Conservation Corps (CCC), the Civil Works Administration (CWA), the Farm Security Administration (FSA), the National Industrial Recovery Act of 1933 (NIRA) and the Social Security Administration (SSA). They provided support for farmers, the unemployed, youth and the elderly. The New Deal included new constraints and safeguards on the banking industry and efforts to re-inflate the economy after prices had fallen sharply. New Deal programs included both laws passed by Congress as well as presidential executive orders during the first term of the presidency of Franklin D. Roosevelt.

Contents

Early life

Short was born in Galena, Missouri on April 7, 1898 to Jackson Grant Short and Permelia C. Long. Short attended Galena High School and Marionville College. He served in the infantry during World War I and graduated from Baker University in 1919 and from Boston University in 1922. Short also attended Harvard University, Heidelberg University, the University of Berlin, and Oxford University. He was a professor of ethics, psychology, and political philosophy at Southwestern College in Winfield, Kansas in 1923, 1924, and 1926-1928. Short was a pastor of the Grace Methodist Episcopal Church, Springfield, Missouri, in 1927. He married Helen Gladys Hughes of Washington, DC, on April 20, 1937. The couple had no children.

Galena, Missouri City in Missouri, United States

Galena is a city in Stone County, Missouri, United States. The population was 440 at the 2010 census. It is the county seat of Stone County. Galena is part of the Branson, Missouri Micropolitan Statistical Area.

Galena High School, home of the Bears, is a Public high school located on Missouri Route 413 in Galena, Missouri, the county seat of Stone County, Missouri. Galena High School is a member of the SouthWest Central League and the Missouri State High School Activities Association (MSHSAA), which is the governing body for high school athletics and activities throughout the state.

World War I 1914–1918 global war originating in Europe

World War I, also known as the First World War or the Great War, was a global war originating in Europe that lasted from 28 July 1914 to 11 November 1918. Contemporaneously described as "the war to end all wars", it led to the mobilisation of more than 70 million military personnel, including 60 million Europeans, making it one of the largest wars in history. It is also one of the deadliest conflicts in history, with an estimated nine million combatants and seven million civilian deaths as a direct result of the war, while resulting genocides and the 1918 influenza pandemic caused another 50 to 100 million deaths worldwide.

Politics

Short was elected as a Republican to the Seventy-first Congress (March 4, 1929 – March 3, 1931) and was an unsuccessful candidate for reelection in 1930 to the Seventy-second Congress. He resumed his former professional pursuits and was a delegate to the Republican National Convention in 1932. Short was an unsuccessful candidate in 1932 for nomination to the United States Senate but was elected to the Seventy-fourth Congress and the ten succeeding Congresses (January 3, 1935 – January 3, 1957). At the 1940 Republican National Convention in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, Short received 108 delegate votes for the party's vice presidential nomination and was the runner-up to the eventual nominee, Charles L. McNary, who received votes from 848 delegates. [1]

71st United States Congress

The Seventy-first United States Congress was a meeting of the legislative branch of the United States federal government, consisting of the United States Senate and the United States House of Representatives. It met in Washington, D.C. from March 4, 1929, to March 4, 1931, during the first two years of Herbert Hoover's presidency. The apportionment of seats in the House of Representatives was based on the Thirteenth Decennial Census of the United States in 1910. Both chambers had a Republican majority. This congress saw the most special elections of any congress with 27 in all.

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The Seventy-second United States Congress was a meeting of the legislative branch of the United States federal government, consisting of the United States Senate and the United States House of Representatives. It met in Washington, D.C. from March 4, 1931, to March 4, 1933, during the last two years of Herbert Hoover's presidency. The apportionment of seats in this House of Representatives was based on the Thirteenth Decennial Census of the United States in 1910. The Senate had a Republican majority. The House started with a very slim Republican majority, but by the time it first met in December 1931, the Democrats had gained a majority through special elections.

The Republican National Convention (RNC) is a series of presidential nominating conventions of the United States Republican Party since 1856. Administered by the Republican National Committee, the stated purpose of the convocation is to nominate an official candidate in an upcoming U.S. presidential election, and to adopt the party platform and rules for the election cycle.

He served as chairman of the Committee on Armed Services in the Eighty-third Congress. On April 30, 1955 he was presented with an Honorary Ozark Hillbilly Medallion by the Springfield, Missouri, Chamber of Commerce during a broadcast of ABC-TV's Ozark Jubilee . [2]

United States House Committee on Armed Services Standing committee of the United States House of Representatives responsible for funding and oversight of the Department of Defense (DOD) and the United States armed forces, as well as substantial portions of the Department of Energy.

The U.S. House Committee on Armed Services, commonly known as the House Armed Services Committee, is a standing committee of the United States House of Representatives. It is responsible for funding and oversight of the Department of Defense (DOD) and the United States armed forces, as well as substantial portions of the Department of Energy.

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The Eighty-third United States Congress was a meeting of the legislative branch of the United States federal government, composed of the United States Senate and the United States House of Representatives. It met in Washington, DC from January 3, 1953, to January 3, 1955, during the final weeks of the second administration of U.S. President Harry S. Truman and the first two years of the first administration of U.S. President Dwight D. Eisenhower.

Springfield, Missouri City in Missouri, United States

Springfield is the third-largest city in the state of Missouri and the county seat of Greene County. As of the 2010 census, its population was 159,498. As of 2017, the Census Bureau estimated its population at 167,376. It is the principal city of the Springfield metropolitan area, which has a population of 462,369 and includes the counties of Christian, Dallas, Greene, Polk, Webster.

Short was an unsuccessful candidate for reelection in 1956 to the Eighty-fifth Congress. He was defeated by Charles H. Brown, the vote being 90,986 for Brown to 89,926 for Short. In 1945, he had served as a congressional delegate to inspect concentration camps in Germany. Short served as Assistant Secretary of the Army from March 15, 1957, to January 20, 1961 and was later President Emeritus of the National Rivers and Harbors Congress. Short died in Washington, D.C. on November 19, 1979 and was interred in Galena Cemetery, Galena, Missouri.

85th United States Congress

The Eighty-fifth United States Congress was a meeting of the legislative branch of the United States federal government, composed of the United States Senate and the United States House of Representatives. It met in Washington, D.C. from January 3, 1957, to January 3, 1959, during the fifth and sixth years of Dwight Eisenhower's presidency. The apportionment of seats in the House of Representatives was based on the Seventeenth Census of the United States in 1950. Both chambers had a Democratic majority.

Germany Federal parliamentary republic in central-western Europe

Germany, officially the Federal Republic of Germany, is a country in Central and Western Europe, lying between the Baltic and North Seas to the north, and the Alps to the south. It borders Denmark to the north, Poland and the Czech Republic to the east, Austria and Switzerland to the south, France to the southwest, and Luxembourg, Belgium and the Netherlands to the west.

Assistant Secretary of the Army

Assistant Secretary of the Army is a title used to describe various civilian officials in the United States Department of the Army.

Richard Nixon cited Short as perhaps the finest orator he had ever seen in his book, In the Arena.

Richard Nixon 37th president of the United States

Richard Milhous Nixon was the 37th president of the United States from 1969 to 1974. He had previously served as the 36th vice president of the United States from 1953 to 1961, and prior to that as both a U.S. representative and senator from California.

Quotes

"I deeply and sincerely regret that this body has degenerated into a supine, subservient, soporific, superfluous, supercilious,pusillanimous body of nitwits, the greatest ever gathered beneath the dome of our National Capitol, who cowardly abdicate their powers and, in violation of their oaths to protect and defend the Constitution against all of the Nation's enemies, both foreign and domestic, turn over these constitutional prerogatives, not only granted but imposed upon them,to a group of tax-eating, conceited autocratic bureaucrats a bunch of theoretical, intellectual, professorial nincompoops out of Columbia University, at the other end of Pennsylvania Avenue who were never elected by the American people to any office and who are responsible to no constituency. These brain trusters and 'new dealers' are the ones who wrote this resolution, instead of the Members of this House whose duty it is, and whose sole duty it is, to draft legislation." --- Delivered in the U.S. House of Representatives on January 23, 1935.

"Mr. Jefferson founded the Democratic Party and President Roosevelt has dumfounded it."

"I have always been old-fashioned enough to believe it is much better to 'git up and get' than it is to 'sit down and set.' The only animal I know which can sit and still produce dividends is the old hen."

"I know that without change there would be no progress, but I am not going to mistake mere change for progress."

"I look at the Supreme Court and know why Jesus wept."

See also

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References

Wiley, Robert S., Dewey Short, Orator of the Ozarks. Cassville, Miss.: Litho Printers and Bindery, 1985.

U.S. House of Representatives
Preceded by
James F. Fulbright
Member of the  U.S. House of Representatives
from Missouri's 14th congressional district

1929–1931
Succeeded by
James F. Fulbright
Preceded by
District established
Member of the  U.S. House of Representatives
from Missouri's 7th congressional district

1935–1957
Succeeded by
Charles H. Brown
Government offices
Preceded by
George H. Roderick
Assistant Secretary of the Army (Civil-Military Affairs)
March 15, 1957 November 1958
Succeeded by
Office abolished