Dianne Wiest

Last updated
Dianne Wiest
Dianewiest.jpg
Wiest at the 1990 Academy Awards
Born
Dianne Evelyn Wiest

(1946-03-28) March 28, 1946 (age 73)
OccupationActress
Years active1970present
Children2

Dianne Evelyn Wiest [1] ( /wst/ ; [2] born March 28, 1946) [3] is an American actress. She has twice won the Academy Award for Best Supporting Actress, for the Woody Allen films Hannah and Her Sisters (1986) and Bullets over Broadway (1994), and appeared in three other films by Allen; The Purple Rose of Cairo (1985), Radio Days (1987), and September (1987). She also received an Academy Award nomination for Parenthood (1989), and won a Golden Globe Award for Bullets over Broadway.

Academy Award for Best Supporting Actress award presented annually by the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences

The Academy Award for Best Supporting Actress is an award presented annually by the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences (AMPAS). It is given in honor of an actress who has delivered an outstanding performance in a supporting role while working within the film industry. The award was traditionally presented by the previous year's Best Supporting Actor winner.

Woody Allen American screenwriter, director, actor, comedian, author, playwright, and musician

Heywood "Woody" Allen is an American director, writer, actor, and comedian whose career spans more than six decades.

<i>Hannah and Her Sisters</i> 1986 film by Woody Allen

Hannah and Her Sisters is a 1986 American comedy-drama film which tells the intertwined stories of an extended family over two years that begins and ends with a family Thanksgiving dinner. The film was written and directed by Woody Allen, who stars along with Mia Farrow as Hannah, Michael Caine as her husband, and Barbara Hershey and Dianne Wiest as her sisters.

Contents

Wiest's other film appearances include Footloose (1984), The Lost Boys (1987), Bright Lights, Big City (1988), Edward Scissorhands (1990), Little Man Tate (1991), The Birdcage (1996), Practical Magic (1998), Dan in Real Life (2007), Synecdoche, New York (2008), Rabbit Hole (2010), and Sisters (2015). She won the 1997 Primetime Emmy Award for Outstanding Guest Actress in a Drama Series for Road to Avonlea , and the 2008 Primetime Emmy Award for Outstanding Supporting Actress in a Drama Series for In Treatment (2008–09). Her other television credits include Law & Order (2000–02), and the CBS comedy series Life in Pieces (2015–2019).

<i>Footloose</i> (1984 film) 1984 American musical-drama film directed by Herbert Ross

Footloose is a 1984 American musical comedy-drama film directed by Herbert Ross. It tells the story of Ren McCormack, a teenager from Chicago who moves to a small western town where he lives with his mother, aunt, and uncle. Throughout the movie, McCormack is seen attempting to overturn the ban on dancing, which resulted from the efforts of a local minister after his son was killed in an accident returning from a night of dancing.

<i>The Lost Boys</i> 1987 film by Joel Schumacher, Richard Donner

The Lost Boys is a 1987 American horror comedy film directed by Joel Schumacher, starring Jason Patric, Corey Haim, Kiefer Sutherland, Jami Gertz, Corey Feldman, Dianne Wiest, Edward Herrmann, Alex Winter, Jamison Newlander, and Barnard Hughes.

<i>Bright Lights, Big City</i> (film) 1988 American film by James Bridges

Bright Lights, Big City is a 1988 American drama film directed by James Bridges, starring Michael J. Fox, Kiefer Sutherland, Phoebe Cates, Dianne Wiest and Jason Robards, and based on the novel by Jay McInerney, who also wrote the screenplay. It was the last film directed by Bridges, who died in 1993.

Early life

Wiest was born in Kansas City, Missouri. Her mother, Anne Stewart (née Keddie), was a nurse. Her father, Bernard John Wiest, was a college dean and former psychiatric social worker for the U.S. Army. Her mother was Scottish, from Auchtermuchty, while her father was an American of Croatian and German descent. [4] [5] They met in Algiers. [6] [7] [8] Wiest has two brothers named Greg and Don. Her original ambition was to be a ballet dancer, but she switched her goal to theater in her senior year at Nurnberg American High School. [9] Wiest graduated from the University of Maryland in 1969 with a degree in Arts and Sciences. [10]

Kansas City, Missouri City in western Missouri

Kansas City is the largest city in the U.S. state of Missouri. According to the U.S. Census Bureau, the city had an estimated population of 491,918 in 2018, making it the 38th most-populous city in the United States. It is the central city of the Kansas City metropolitan area, which straddles the Kansas–Missouri state line. Kansas City was founded in the 1830s as a Missouri River port at its confluence with the Kansas River coming in from the west. On June 1, 1850 the town of Kansas was incorporated; shortly after came the establishment of the Kansas Territory. Confusion between the two ensued and the name Kansas City was assigned to distinguish them soon after.

Scottish people ethnic inhabitants of Scotland

The Scottish people or Scots, are a nation and Celtic ethnic group native to Scotland. Historically, they emerged from an amalgamation of two Celtic-speaking peoples, the Picts and Gaels, who founded the Kingdom of Scotland in the 9th century. Later, the neighbouring Celtic-speaking Cumbrians, as well as Germanic-speaking Anglo-Saxons and Norse, were incorporated into the Scottish nation.

Auchtermuchty town

Auchtermuchty is a town in Fife, Scotland. It is beside Pitlour Hill and nine miles north of Glenrothes.

Career

Stage

Wiest studied theater at the University of Maryland, leaving after her third term to tour with a Shakespearean troupe. Later, she had a supporting role in a New York Shakespeare Festival production of Ashes. [11] She also acted at the Yale Repertory Theatre in New Haven, CT, playing the title role in Henrik Ibsen's Hedda Gabler . She was an understudy both off-Broadway and on Broadway, in Kurt Vonnegut's Happy Birthday, Wanda June in 1970. [12] [13]

University of Maryland, College Park public research university in the city of College Park in Prince Georges County, Maryland

The University of Maryland, College Park is a public research university in College Park, Maryland. Founded in 1856, UMD is the flagship institution of the University System of Maryland, and is the largest university in both the state and the Washington metropolitan area, with more than 41,000 students representing all fifty states and 123 countries, and a global alumni network of over 360,000. Its twelve schools and colleges together offer over 200 degree-granting programs, including 92 undergraduate majors, 107 master's programs, and 83 doctoral programs. UMD is a member of the Association of American Universities and competes in intercollegiate athletics as a member of the Big Ten Conference.

Yale Repertory Theatre

Yale Repertory Theatre at Yale University in New Haven, Connecticut was founded by Robert Brustein, dean of Yale School of Drama, in 1966, with the goal of facilitating a meaningful collaboration between theatre professionals and talented students. In the process it has become one of the first distinguished regional theatres. Located at the edge of Yale's main downtown campus, it occupies the former Calvary Baptist Church.

Henrik Ibsen Norwegian playwright and theatre director

Henrik Johan Ibsen was a Norwegian playwright, theatre director, and poet. As one of the founders of modernism in theatre, Ibsen is often referred to as "the father of realism" and one of the most influential playwrights of his time. His major works include Brand, Peer Gynt, An Enemy of the People, Emperor and Galilean, A Doll's House, Hedda Gabler, Ghosts, The Wild Duck, When We Dead Awaken, Pillars of Society, The Lady from the Sea, Rosmersholm, The Master Builder, and John Gabriel Borkman. He is the most frequently performed dramatist in the world after Shakespeare, and by the early 20th century A Doll's House became the world's most performed play.

She made her Broadway debut in Robert Anderson's Solitaire/Double Solitaire, taking over in the role of the daughter in 1971. [14] She landed a four-year job as a member of the Arena Stage in Washington, D.C., [15] in such roles as Emily in Our Town , Honey in Who's Afraid of Virginia Woolf? , and leading roles in S. Ansky's The Dybbuk , Maxim Gorky's The Lower Depths and George Bernard Shaw's Heartbreak House. [4] She toured the USSR with the Arena Stage. [16] In 1976, Wiest attended the Eugene O'Neill National Playwrights Conference and starred in leading roles in Amlin Gray's Pirates and Christopher Durang's A History of the American Film. At Joe Papp's Public Theater she took over the lead in Ashes, and played Cassandra in Agamemnon , directed by Andrei Şerban. In 1979, she originated the role of Agnes in Agnes of God in its first production in Waterford, Connecticut. [17]

Arena Stage not-for-profit regional theater

Arena Stage is a not-for-profit regional theater based in Southwest, Washington, D.C. It was a pioneer in 1950 of the Regional Theater Movement.

Washington, D.C. Capital of the United States

Washington, D.C., formally the District of Columbia and commonly referred to as Washington or D.C., is the capital of the United States. Founded after the American Revolution as the seat of government of the newly independent country, Washington was named after George Washington, the first President of the United States and a Founding Father. As the seat of the United States federal government and several international organizations, Washington is an important world political capital. The city is also one of the most visited cities in the world, with more than 20 million tourists annually.

<i>Our Town</i> play written by Thornton Wilder

Our Town is a 1938 metatheatrical three-act play by American playwright Thornton Wilder. It tells the story of the fictional American small town of Grover's Corners between 1901 and 1913 through the everyday lives of its citizens.

She appeared in two plays by Tina Howe: Museum and The Art of Dining. In the latter, Wiest's performance as the shy and awkward author Elizabeth Barrow Colt won three off-Broadway theater awards: an Obie Award (1980), a Theatre World Award (1979–1980), and the Clarence Derwent Award (1980), given yearly for the most promising performance in New York theatre. [18] [19] [20] [21]

Tina Howe American playwright

Tina Howe is an American playwright. In a career that spans more than four decades, Howe's best-known works include Museum, The Art of Dining, Painting Churches, Coastal Disturbances and Pride's Crossing.

The Obie Awards or Off-Broadway Theater Awards are annual awards originally given by The Village Voice newspaper to theatre artists and groups in New York City. In September 2014, the awards were jointly presented and administered with the American Theatre Wing. As the Tony Awards cover Broadway productions, the Obie Awards cover Off-Broadway and Off-Off-Broadway productions.

The Theatre World Award is an American honor presented annually to actors and actresses in recognition of an outstanding New York City stage debut performance, either on Broadway or off-Broadway. It was first awarded for the 1945–1946 theatre season.

On Broadway she appeared in Frankenstein (1981), directed by Tom Moore, portrayed Desdemona in Othello (1982) opposite James Earl Jones and Christopher Plummer and co-starred with John Lithgow in Christopher Durang's romantic screwball comedy Beyond Therapy (1982), directed by John Madden. [14] (She played opposite Lithgow again in the Herbert Ross film Footloose . During the 1980s, she also performed in Hedda Gabler , directed by Lloyd Richards at Yale Repertory Theatre, [22] and in Harold Pinter's A Kind of Alaska (1984, Manhattan Theatre Club), [23] Lanford Wilson's Serenading Louie (1984), [24] and Janusz Glowacki's Hunting Cockroaches (1987, Manhattan Theater Club). [25] As Wiest became established as a film actress through her work in Woody Allen's films, she was less frequently available for stage roles. However, she did appear onstage during the 1990s, in In the Summer House, Square One, Cynthia Ozick's The Shawl, and Naomi Wallace's One Flea Spare . In 2003, she appeared with Al Pacino and Marisa Tomei in Oscar Wilde's Salome . In 2005, she starred in Kathleen Tolan's Memory House. She also starred in a production of Wendy Wasserstein's final play Third (directed by Daniel Sullivan) at Lincoln Center. [26]

Recent New York theater roles include performances as Arkadina in an off-Broadway revival of The Seagull (opposite Alan Cumming's Trigorin) and as Kate Keller in a Broadway revival of Arthur Miller's All My Sons , opposite John Lithgow, Patrick Wilson, and Katie Holmes. [27] In 2009, Wiest appeared in the National Memorial Day Concert on the Mall in Washington, D.C. in a dialogue with Katie Holmes celebrating the life of an American veteran seriously wounded in Iraq, José Pequeño. [28] Wiest spent September 2010 as a visiting teacher at Columbia University's Graduate Acting Program, [29] working with a group of 18 first-year MFA Acting students on selected plays by Anton Chekhov and Arthur Miller.

In 2016 she took on the role of "Winnie" in The Yale Repertory Theatre's production of Samuel Beckett's, Happy Days. [30] She reprised the role for Theatre for a New Audience in downtown Brooklyn, NY, in the spring of 2017 [31] and the Mark Taper Forum in Los Angeles in 2019. [32]

Film and television

Her early screen roles include small roles in It's My Turn and I'm Dancing as Fast as I Can , both starring Jill Clayburgh in the lead roles. In 1984, she starred in Footloose , as the reverend's wife and Ariel's mother. Under Woody Allen's direction, Wiest won an Academy Award for Best Supporting Actress for Hannah and Her Sisters in 1987 and Bullets over Broadway in 1995. [15] [33] She also appeared in three other Woody Allen films: The Purple Rose of Cairo (1985), Radio Days (1987) and September (1987). [34]

Wiest (left) in 2011 Defense.gov photo essay 110529-N-TT977-379.jpg
Wiest (left) in 2011

She followed her first Oscar success with performances in The Lost Boys (1987) and Bright Lights, Big City (1988). She also starred with Steve Martin, Mary Steenburgen, Jason Robards, Keanu Reeves and Martha Plimpton in Ron Howard's Parenthood , for which she received her second Oscar nomination. Other major film roles include Tim Burton's Edward Scissorhands (1990), Jodie Foster's Little Man Tate (1991) and The Birdcage (1996), Mike Nichols' remake of La Cage aux Folles .

On television, her performance on the series Road to Avonlea in 1989 brought her her first Emmy Award for Outstanding Guest Actress in a Dramatic Series. She received another nomination for her performance in the 1999 telefilm The Simple Life of Noah Dearborn , co-starring Sidney Poitier. She starred in the television mini-series The 10th Kingdom in 2000. From 2000 to 2002, Wiest portrayed interim District Attorney Nora Lewin in the long-running NBC crime drama Law & Order . She also played the character in two episodes of Law & Order: Special Victims Unit and the pilot episode of Law & Order: Criminal Intent .

Wiest starred alongside Steve Carell and Juliette Binoche in Dan in Real Life (2007) and had a key supporting role in Charlie Kaufman's 2008 film Synecdoche, New York . In 2008, she appeared as Gabriel Byrne's therapist, Gina Toll, on the HBO television series In Treatment , for which she received her second Emmy Award, for Outstanding Supporting Actress in a Drama Series. She received another nomination (in the same category) for the second season, in 2009, but did not win. She starred alongside Nicole Kidman in Rabbit Hole (2010), which debuted at the Toronto International Film Festival. Wiest also co-starred in Lawrence Kasdan's 2012 comedy Darling Companion , alongside Kevin Kline and Diane Keaton.

Personal life

Wiest was in a relationship with her talent agent Sam Cohn (1929–2009) for many years. [35] She adopted two daughters: Emily (born 1987) and Lily (born 1991). [16]

Filmography

Film

YearTitleRoleNotes
1980 It's My Turn Gailas Diane Wiest
1982 I'm Dancing as Fast as I Can Julie Addison
1983Face of RageRebecca Hammil
1983 Independence Day Nancy MorganNominated — New York Film Critics Circle Award for Best Supporting Actress
1984 Falling in Love Isabelle
1984 Footloose Vi Moore
1985 The Purple Rose of Cairo Emma
1986 Hannah and Her Sisters Holly Academy Award for Best Supporting Actress
Boston Society of Film Critics Award for Best Supporting Actress
Los Angeles Film Critics Association Award for Best Supporting Actress
National Board of Review Award for Best Supporting Actress
National Society of Film Critics Award for Best Supporting Actress
New York Film Critics Circle Award for Best Supporting Actress
Nominated — Golden Globe Award for Best Supporting Actress – Motion Picture
1987 Radio Days BeaNominated — BAFTA Award for Best Actress in a Supporting Role
1987 September Stephanie
1987 The Lost Boys Lucy Emerson
1988 Bright Lights, Big City Mother
1989 Parenthood Helen BuckmanNominated — Academy Award for Best Supporting Actress
Nominated — American Comedy Award for Funniest Supporting Actress in a Motion Picture
Nominated — Golden Globe Award for Best Supporting Actress – Motion Picture
1989 Cookie Lenore
1990 Edward Scissorhands Peg BoggsNominated — Chicago Film Critics Association Award for Best Supporting Actress
Nominated — Los Angeles Film Critics Association Award for Best Supporting Actress
Nominated — National Society of Film Critics Award for Best Supporting Actress
Nominated — Saturn Award for Best Supporting Actress
1991 Little Man Tate Jane Grierson
1994 Bullets over Broadway Helen Sinclair Academy Award for Best Supporting Actress
American Comedy Award for Funniest Supporting Actress in a Motion Picture
Chicago Film Critics Association Award for Best Supporting Actress
Dallas–Fort Worth Film Critics Association Award for Best Supporting Actress
Golden Globe Award for Best Supporting Actress – Motion Picture
Independent Spirit Award for Best Supporting Female
Kansas City Film Critics Circle Award for Best Supporting Actress
Los Angeles Film Critics Association Award for Best Supporting Actress
National Society of Film Critics Award for Best Supporting Actress
New York Film Critics Circle Award for Best Supporting Actress
Screen Actors Guild Award for Outstanding Performance by a Female Actor in a Supporting Role
Society of Texas Film Critics Award for Best Supporting Actress
Southeastern Film Critics Association Award for Best Supporting Actress
Nominated — Boston Society of Film Critics Award for Best Supporting Actress
1994 Cops & Robbersons Helen Robberson
1994 The Scout Doctor H. Aaron
1995 Drunks Rachel
1996 The Associate Sally Dugan
1996 The Birdcage Louise Keeley American Comedy Award for Funniest Supporting Actress in a Motion Picture
Blockbuster Entertainment Award for Favorite Supporting Actress in a Comedy
Screen Actors Guild Award for Outstanding Performance by a Cast in a Motion Picture
1998 Practical Magic Aunt Bridget 'Jet' OwensNominated — American Comedy Award for Funniest Supporting Actress in a Motion Picture
Nominated — Blockbuster Entertainment Award for Favorite Supporting Actress in a Comedy
1998 The Horse Whisperer Diane Booker
2001 I Am Sam Annie Cassell
2002 Merci Docteur Rey Elisabeth Beaumont
2005 Robots Lydia CopperbottomVoice only
2006 A Guide to Recognizing Your Saints Flori Sundance Film Festival — Special Jury Prize for Best Ensemble Performance
2007 Dedication Carol
2007 Dan in Real Life Nana Burns
2008 Passengers Toni
2008 Synecdoche, New York Ellen Bascomb/Millicent Weems Gotham Independent Film Award for Best Ensemble Cast
Independent Spirit Award - Robert Altman Award
2009 Rage Miss Roth
2010 Rabbit Hole NatNominated — Satellite Award for Best Supporting Actress - Motion Picture
2011 The Big Year Brenda Harris
2012 Darling Companion Penny
2012 The Odd Life of Timothy Green Ms. Crudstaff
2014 The Humbling Carol, Pegeen's Mother
2015 Five Nights in Maine Lucinda
2015 Sisters Deana Ellis
2018 The Mule Mary

Television

YearTitleRoleNotes
1975Zalmen: or, The Madness of GodNinaTelevision film [36]
1978 Great Performances: Out of Our Father's House Elizabeth Gertrude Stern Television film
1997 Road to Avonlea Lillian HepworthTV series
Primetime Emmy Award for Outstanding Guest Actress in a Drama Series
1999 The Simple Life of Noah Dearborn Sarah McClellanTelevision film
Nominated — Primetime Emmy Award for Outstanding Supporting Actress in a Miniseries or a Movie
2000 The 10th Kingdom The Evil Queen/Christine White Television miniseries
2000–02 Law & Order D.A. Nora Lewin Seasons 11 & 12: 48 episodes
Nominated — Screen Actors Guild Award for Outstanding Performance by an Ensemble in a Drama Series (200001)
2001 Law & Order: Criminal Intent D.A. Nora Lewin Episode: "One"
2001–02 Law & Order: Special Victims Unit D.A. Nora Lewin 2 episodes
2004 The Blackwater Lightship LilyTelevision film
Satellite Award for Best Actress – Miniseries or Television Film
2004 Category 6: Day of Destruction Secretary of Energy Shirley AbbottTelevision miniseries
2008–09 In Treatment Dr. Gina TollSeason 1 & 2: 17 episodes
Gracie Award for Outstanding Supporting Actress – Drama Series
Primetime Emmy Award for Outstanding Supporting Actress – Drama Series (2008)
Nominated — Primetime Emmy Award for Outstanding Supporting Actress – Drama Series (2009)
Nominated — Golden Globe Award for Best Supporting Actress – Series, Miniseries or Television Film (2009)
Nominated — Satellite Award for Best Supporting Actress – Series, Miniseries or Television Film (2008)
2008 The Return of Jezebel James Talia Tompkins2 episodes
2014 The Blacklist Ruth Kipling1 episode: Season 1, Episode 15, "The Judge" (#57)
2015–present Life in Pieces Joan ShortSeries regular

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References

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