Dicastery

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A dicastery (from Greek : δικαστήριον, romanized: dikastērion, lit. 'law-court', from δικαστής, 'judge, juror') is a department of the Roman Curia, the administration of the Holy See through which the pope directs the Roman Catholic Church. The most recent comprehensive constitution of the church, Pastor bonus (1988), includes this definition:

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By the word "dicasteries" are understood the Secretariat of State, Congregations, Tribunals, Councils and Offices, namely, the Apostolic Camera, the Administration of the Patrimony of the Apostolic See and the Prefecture for the Economic Affairs of the Holy See. [1]

Dicasteries of the Roman Curia

These dicasteries or departments are grouped in the following categories:

See also

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References

  1. "Pastor Bonus: Dicasteries". Archived from the original on June 1, 2013.Cite journal requires |journal= (help)