Dick Harris (American football)

Last updated
Dick Harris
Dick Harris 1961.jpg
No. 36
Position: Defensive back
Personal information
Born: (1937-07-24) July 24, 1937 (age 80)
Denver, Colorado
Career information
College: McNeese State
Undrafted: 1960
Career history
Career highlights and awards
Career NFL statistics
Games played: 76
Interceptions: 29
Touchdowns: 5
Player stats at PFR

Dick Harris (born July 24, 1937) is a former American football defensive back who played six seasons in the American Football League with the Los Angeles/San Diego Chargers from 1960 to 1965. He was selected to the 1960 and 1961 AFL All-League teams. Harris had a total of 25 interceptions in the Chargers' first four seasons.

American football Team field sport

American football, referred to as football in the United States and Canada and also known as gridiron, is a team sport played by two teams of eleven players on a rectangular field with goalposts at each end. The offense, which is the team controlling the oval-shaped football, attempts to advance down the field by running with or passing the ball, while the defense, which is the team without control of the ball, aims to stop the offense's advance and aims to take control of the ball for themselves. The offense must advance at least ten yards in four downs, or plays, and otherwise they turn over the football to the defense; if the offense succeeds in advancing ten yards or more, they are given a new set of four downs. Points are primarily scored by advancing the ball into the opposing team's end zone for a touchdown or kicking the ball through the opponent's goalposts for a field goal. The team with the most points at the end of a game wins.

Defensive back position in American football and Canadian football

In American football and Canadian football, defensive backs (DBs) are the players on the defensive team who take positions somewhat back from the line of scrimmage; they are distinguished from the defensive line players and linebackers, who take positions directly behind or close to the line of scrimmage.

American Football League Professional football league that merged with National Football League in 1970

The American Football League (AFL) was a major professional American football league that operated for ten seasons from 1960 until 1969, when it merged with the older National Football League (NFL), and became the American Football Conference. The upstart AFL operated in direct competition with the more established NFL throughout its existence. It was more successful than earlier rivals to the NFL with the same name, the 1926, 1936 and 1940 leagues, and the later All-America Football Conference.

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