Dick Rowley

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Dick Rowley
Dick Rowley.jpg
Personal information
Full nameRichard William Morris Rowley
Date of birth(1904-01-13)13 January 1904
Place of birth Enniskillen, Ireland
Date of death 18 April 1984(1984-04-18) (aged 80)
Place of death Southampton, England
Height 6 ft 0 in (1.83 m) [1]
Playing position(s) Inside-forward / centre-forward
Youth career
Taunton's Grammar School
Fulwood Barracks
Senior career*
YearsTeamApps(Gls)
Tidworth United
1922–1924 Andover
1924–1926 Swindon Town 2 (2)
1925Casuals 2 (1)
1926–1930 Southampton 104 (52)
1930–1931 Tottenham Hotspur 24 (10)
1931–1934 Preston North End 51 (14)
National team
1929–1931 Ireland 6 (2)
* Senior club appearances and goals counted for the domestic league only

Richard William Morris Rowley DCM (13 January 1904 – 18 April 1984) was an Irish professional footballer who played as an inside-forward or centre-forward for Southampton, Tottenham Hotspur and Preston North End in the English Football League, as well as representing the Irish national team. [2]

Contents

Early life

Rowley was born in Enniskillen, the son of a major in the British army. [3] [1] He moved to Hampshire as a child and was educated at Taunton's Grammar School, Southampton, [1] where he played rugby. [3] During his youth, he excelled at various sports including cricket, golf, tennis, sprinting and hurdling. [3]

Upon joining the armed forces, he served at Fulwood Barracks in Lancashire and Tidworth Camp in Wiltshire, [1] receiving the Distinguished Conduct Medal. [3]

Club career

He played for Andover as an amateur from September 1922, [1] and after scoring a few goals from the wing, he was signed by Swindon Town in November 1924, still retaining his amateur status. [1]

He made his Swindon debut away to Exeter City on 5 April 1926, when he scored twice in a 2–1 victory. [4] His next appearance came a few weeks later, in a 3–2 defeat at Watford. [5] While he was registered with Swindon Town, Rowley also made two appearances in November 1925 for the Casuals amateur team in the Isthmian League, scoring once. [6]

In May 1926, he was signed by Southampton of the Football League Second Division, as a replacement for Arthur Dominy who had joined Everton in the summer. [1] He was initially registered as an amateur, but signed his first professional contract in November 1926. [1]

Described as "a gangly inside-forward", [1] he made his debut at inside left in the opening match of the 1926–27 season. After two matches, he lost his place to Alf Bishop but was recalled, as inside right in October and retained his place for the rest of the season. [7] Rowley soon developed a good relationship with centre-forward Bill Rawlings, [1] as the Saints reached second place in the division by the New Year. After that, the club's fortunes turned and they only managed a further four victories in the league. [7] In the FA Cup, however, five goals each from Rowley and Rawlings helped the Saints reach the semi-finals where they lost 2–1 to Arsenal of the First Division. [7] [8]

Rowley's form attracted interest from several larger clubs, [1] but he remained at The Dell. In 1927–28, he was a regular in the side until December when he lost his place to Charlie Petrie. Rowley was recalled to the side in March, playing at centre-forward, after Rawlings had been sold to Manchester United. [9]

In the following season, with first Petrie and then Herbert Coates being preferred at inside-right, it was not until the end of October that Rowley was once again given a run in the team, this time playing at outside-right. After a few matches at centre-forward, he reverted to inside-right in December, retaining his place for the remainder of the season. [10]

Rowley's best season for the Saints came in 1929–30, when he scored 25 goals from 25 appearances, including hat-tricks in successive matches against Chelsea and Nottingham Forest in September and four goals at Bradford City on 2 November, [11] thus becoming the first Southampton player to score four goals in an away game. [1]

In February 1930, another Second Division club, Tottenham Hotspur made a bid of £3,750 for Rowley which the Southampton board found "irresistible". [1] His spell at Southampton was particularly prolific as he scored 52 goals in his 104 league appearances together with six goals in nine FA Cup matches. [1]

He spent much of his time at White Hart Lane in the reserves [3] and remained at Tottenham until midway through the following season, having scored ten goals in 24 matches. [12]

In December 1931, he was signed by Preston North End (also in the Second Division) for a fee of £5,000, with Ted Harper also making the same move. [3] In Rowley's first full season at Deepdale, Rowley's crosses helped Harper score 37 goals but after Harper was sold to Blackburn Rovers, injuries restricted Rowley's appearances. He was only able to play five times in 1933–34 as Preston gained promotion as runners-up. Rowley retired in the summer of 1934, and was never to play in the First Division. [3]

International career

In the years between 1929 and 1931, he won six caps for Ireland, [3] scoring two goals against Scotland and Wales.

His international debut came in a British Home Championship match against Wales on 2 February 1929 with his first international goal coming three weeks later when he was one of the few Irish players to emerge with any credit from a 7–3 defeat by Scotland. [3] (Some sources credit Ireland's first goal to Rowley, [13] but the match report confirms that this was scored by Joe Bambrick. [14] )

His finest international performance came on 1 February 1930, against Wales at Belfast's Celtic Park, when his passes helped Bambrick score a double hat-trick in a 7–0 victory. [15]

International appearances

Rowley made six appearances for Ireland in official international matches, as follows: [16]

DateVenueOpponentResult [17] GoalsCompetition
2 February 1929 Racecourse Ground, Wrexham Flag of Wales (1959-present).svg  Wales 2–20 British Home Championship
23 February 1929 Windsor Park, Belfast Flag of Scotland.svg  Scotland 3–71British Home Championship
19 October 1929Windsor Park, BelfastFlag of England.svg  England 0–30 British Home Championship
1 February 1930 Celtic Park, BelfastFlag of Wales (1959-present).svg  Wales 7–00British Home Championship
22 April 1931Racecourse Ground, WrexhamFlag of Wales (1959-present).svg  Wales 2–31 British Home Championship
19 September 1931 Ibrox Park, GlasgowFlag of Scotland.svg  Scotland 1–30 British Home Championship
WinDrawLoss

Later career

In July 1937, Rowley became a coach firstly with Lancashire AFA and later at RAF Uxbridge. [3] In April 1942, he was commissioned as an acting pilot officer, [18] with the rank made permanent in June. [19] In October 1942 he was promoted to flying officer [20] and in January 1946 to flight lieutenant. [21] In May 1955, he was transferred to reserve with the rank of squadron leader. [22]

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The 1920–21 season was the 26th season of competitive football by Southampton, and the club's first in the Football League. At the end of the previous season, Southampton were one of a host of Southern League clubs elected to make up the new Third Division, finishing second in the inaugural season behind champions Crystal Palace. The Saints began the season strongly, winning seven of their first ten games to begin a lengthy run at the top of the league table until the end of the year. The club began to lose against several teams lower in the table in December, dropping a position as Palace continued to win the majority of their games. Southampton finished the season in second place with 19 wins, 16 draws and seven losses, four points behind the champions and one point ahead of third-placed Queens Park Rangers.

The 1926–27 season was the 32nd season of competitive football by Southampton, and the club's fifth in the Second Division of the Football League. After having their worst year in the division the previous season, Southampton began the 1926–27 league campaign in strong fashion and found themselves in amongst the promotion hopefuls by the end of the year, just two points off front-runners Middlesbrough. However, following a lengthy run in the FA Cup the club's form began to deteriorate, ending with a series of 13 games which included just one win. The Saints dropped from as high as the top six of the Second Division table to a mid-table position, ending the season in 13th place with 15 wins, 12 draws and 15 losses – just one position and four points higher than their 14th-place finish the previous season.

The 1927–28 season was the 33rd season of competitive football by Southampton, and the club's sixth in the Second Division of the Football League. The season was the club's worst in the division to date, as they finished in 17th place just two points above Fulham in the first relegation spot. After a poor start in which they lost their first four games of the campaign, the Saints continued to drop points against teams throughout the Second Division, remaining in the bottom six positions for most of the year. A number of wins in the second half of the season over fellow mid-table sides helped to offset notable losses against those aiming for promotion, ensuring that the club avoided returning down to the Third Division South. Southampton finished the season in 17th place with 14 wins, seven draws and 21 losses.

The 1928–29 season was the 34th season of competitive football by Southampton, and the club's seventh in the Second Division of the Football League. After finishing in the bottom half of the Second Division league table the last three seasons, the club returned to challenging for promotion to the First Division when they finished fourth, their highest position in the league to date. The team were strong throughout the campaign, picking up key wins over teams around them in the table to secure a strong position. They stayed in the top six of the league for most of the campaign from September, reaching third place on two occasions and dropping to seventh just twice. Southampton finished the season in fourth place with 17 wins, 14 draws and 11 losses, five points behind Grimsby Town in the first promotion place.

The 1929–30 season was the 35th season of competitive football by Southampton, and the club's eighth in the Second Division of the Football League. After finishing fourth in the Second Division the previous season – their highest position in the league to date – Southampton continued their efforts towards achieving promotion to the First Division, but finished three places lower in seventh. The club struggled at the beginning of the league campaign, remaining in the bottom half of the table due to a run of poor results. A period of form including six wins in eight games followed between September and November, enabling the Saints to move up as high as third place. The team remained in the top half of the Second Division table for most of the rest of the season, finishing in seventh place with 17 wins, 11 draws and 14 losses.

The 1930–31 season was the 36th season of competitive football by Southampton, and the club's ninth in the Second Division of the Football League. After securing their place as a top-half side in the Second Division over the past two seasons, the Saints began to lose their footing on the league and dropped to ninth in the division. The club failed to win any of their first four games of the campaign, briefly struggling to stay above the two relegation places, but had soon made their way to the top half of the division where they remained for the rest of the season. The Saints were unable to challenge for promotion to the First Division, however, briefly reaching the top five but remaining a long way off the top two sides. Southampton finished the season in ninth place in the table with 19 wins, six draws and 17 losses.

The 1931–32 season was the 37th season of competitive football by Southampton, and the club's tenth in the Second Division of the Football League. After finishing in the top half of the Second Division league table for the past three seasons, the Saints struggled to challenge in 1931–32 and ended up finishing in 14th place, closer to relegation than promotion. Southampton's first season with manager George Kay started strongly, as the team picked up four wins in their first five matches and reached the top of the Second Division league table for the first time in the club's history. Form quickly deteriorated, however, and the club was briefly involved in a fight for survival in the new year. After picking up a few more wins, Southampton secured their safety and finished in 14th place with 14 wins, 14 draws and 14 losses.

References

  1. 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 Holley, Duncan; Chalk, Gary (1992). The Alphabet of the Saints. ACL & Polar Publishing. p. 292. ISBN   0-9514862-3-3.
  2. Joyce, Michael (2004). Football League Players' Records 1888 to 1939. Nottingham: Tony Brown. p. 228. ISBN   1-899468-67-6.
  3. 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 "Northern Ireland's Footballing Greats – Dick Rowley". 10 September 2007. Retrieved 26 October 2012.
  4. "Exeter City 1 Swindon Town 2". Swindon Town FC. 5 April 1926. Retrieved 26 October 2012.
  5. "Dick Rowley's playing record for Swindon Town". Swindon Town FC. Retrieved 26 October 2012.
  6. Cavallini, Rob (2009). A Casual Affair – A History of the Casuals Football Club. Dog N Duck Publications. pp. 264–265. ISBN   0-9550496-2-8.
  7. 1 2 3 Chalk, Gary; Holley, Duncan (1987). Saints – A complete record. Breedon Books. pp. 76–77. ISBN   0-907969-22-4.
  8. Collett, Mike (2003). The Complete Record of the FA Cup. Sports Books. p. 561. ISBN   1-899807-19-5.
  9. Saints – A complete record. pp. 78–79.
  10. Saints – A complete record. pp. 80–81.
  11. Saints – A complete record. pp. 82–83.
  12. Duggan, Jim. "Player appearances and goals". Tottenham Hotspur. www.topspurs.com. Retrieved 26 October 2012.
  13. "Ireland 3 Scotland 7". London Hearts. 23 February 1929. Retrieved 26 October 2012.
  14. "Scots Take Game in Hand". Ireland 3 Scotland 7. www.londonhearts.com. 23 February 1929. Retrieved 26 October 2012.
  15. Peake, Robin (1 February 2007). "No.1 Northern Ireland 7 Wales 0". Ten Greatest matches. Retrieved 27 October 2012.
  16. "Richard William Morris Rowley". International career details. eu-football.info. Retrieved 26 October 2012.
  17. Ireland score first
  18. "No. 35580". The London Gazette . 2 June 1942. p. 2382.
  19. "No. 35615". The London Gazette . 30 June 1942. p. 2883.
  20. "No. 35891". The London Gazette (Supplement). 5 February 1943. p. 657.
  21. "No. 37460". The London Gazette (Supplement). 8 February 1946. p. 860.
  22. "No. 40473". The London Gazette (Supplement). 10 May 1955. p. 2701.