Diminished major seventh chord

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diminished major seventh
Component intervals from root
major seventh
diminished fifth (tritone)
minor third
root
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In music theory, a diminished major seventh chord is a seventh chord composed of a diminished triad and a major seventh. [1] Thus, it is composed of a root note, together with a minor third, a diminished fifth, and a major seventh above the root: (1, 3, 5, 7). For example, the diminished major seventh chord built on C, commonly written as CoM7, has pitches C–E–G–B:

Diminished major seventh chord

Diminished major seventh chords are very dissonant, containing the dissonant intervals of the tritone and the major seventh. They are frequently encountered, especially in jazz, as a diminished seventh chord with an appoggiatura, especially when the melody has the leading note of the given chord: the ability to resolve this dissonance smoothly to a diatonic triad with the same root allows it to be used as a temporary tension before tonic resolution. It is nevertheless infrequently used as a chord in itself.

The chord can be represented by the integer notation {0, 3, 6, 11}.

Diminished major seventh chord table

ChordRootMinor thirdDiminished fifthMajor seventh
CoM7CEGB
CoM7CEGB (C)
DoM7DF (E)A Doubleflat.svg (G)C
DoM7DFAC
DoM7DFAC DoubleSharp.svg (D)
EoM7EGB Doubleflat.svg (A)D
EoM7EGBD
FoM7FAC (B)E
FoM7FACE (F)
GoM7GB Doubleflat.svg (A)D Doubleflat.svg (C)F
GoM7GBDF
GoM7GBDF DoubleSharp.svg (G)
AoM7AC (B)E Doubleflat.svg (D)G
AoM7ACEG
AoM7ACEG DoubleSharp.svg (A)
BoM7BDF (E)A
BoM7BDFA

Sources

  1. Jamini, Deborah. (2005). Harmony And Composition: Basics to Intermediate, p.204. ISBN   978-1-4120-3333-6.

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