Diocese of Wakefield

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Coordinates: 53°40′48″N1°30′00″W / 53.680°N 1.500°W / 53.680; -1.500

Contents

Diocese of Wakefield
Diocese of Wakefield arms.svg
Coat of arms
Location
Ecclesiastical province York
Archdeaconries Halifax, Pontefract
Statistics
Parishes188
Churches234
Information
Established18 May 1888 (1888-05-18)–20 April 2014 (2014-04-20)
Cathedral Wakefield Cathedral
Current leadership
BishopAt dissolution: Stephen Platten, Bishop of Wakefield
Suffragan At dissolution: Tony Robinson, Bishop of Pontefract
Archdeacons At dissolution:
Peter Townley, Archdeacon of Pontefract
Dr Anne Dawtry, Archdeacon of Halifax
Website
wakefield.anglican.org
The spire of the Cathedral Church of All Saints, Wakefield The Cathedral spire (247'), Wakefield.jpg
The spire of the Cathedral Church of All Saints, Wakefield

The Diocese of Wakefield is a former Church of England diocese based in Wakefield in West Yorkshire, covering Wakefield, Barnsley, Kirklees and Calderdale. The cathedral was Wakefield Cathedral and the bishop was the diocesan Bishop of Wakefield.

The Diocese of Wakefield was created out of the Diocese of Ripon in 1888 in response to the rapid expansion in population due to the Industrial Revolution. Immediately prior to its dissolution it extended north to south from the suburbs of Leeds to Barnsley and east to west from Kellington to Todmorden. The diocese was dissolved on 20 April 2014 by the creation of the new Diocese of Leeds. [1]

History

After discussions in the mid-1870s as to where a new diocese in the West Riding of Yorkshire should be, Wakefield, with a population of under 30,000, was chosen before Leeds and Bradford and Huddersfield and Halifax. Wakefield was then the county town of the West Riding and had a large medieval church. [2]

The new Diocese of Wakefield was taken out of the southern part of the Diocese of Ripon, which was formed in 1836 out of the vast Diocese of York, and divided the industrial area of the West Riding separating Wakefield, Huddersfield and Halifax from Leeds and Bradford which remained in Ripon. The diocese was enlarged in 1926 to include the deaneries of Hemsworth and Pontefract from the Diocese of York. [2]

As constituted on 18 May 1888, [3] the diocese comprised the archdeaconries of Halifax and Huddersfield. [4] In 1927, the archdeaconries were reorganised into the archdeaconries of Halifax and of Pontefract. The old archdeaconry of Halifax, in the northwest, the deaneries of Birstall, Halifax and Dewsbury, became the archdeaconry of Pontefract, covering the deaneries of Barnsley, Birstal, Dewsbury, Pontefract and Wakefield in the east and the archdeaconry of Huddersfield, which covered the deaneries of Hemworth, Huddersfield, Pontefract, Silkstone and Wakefield, became the new archdeaconry of Halifax, covering the west (the deaneries of Halifax and Huddersfield). [5]

Merger

On 2 March 2013, the diocesan synod voted against proposals to abolish the diocese in order to create a Leeds diocese [6] however the proposal was approved on 8 July 2013 by the General Synod. [7] The merger came into force on 20 April 2014, at which point the Bradford, Ripon and Leeds and Wakefield dioceses merged. [1]

Related Research Articles

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West Yorkshire is a metropolitan and ceremonial county in the Yorkshire and the Humber region of England. It is an inland and upland county having eastward-draining valleys while taking in the moors of the Pennines. West Yorkshire came into existence as a metropolitan county in 1974 after the reorganisation of the Local Government Act 1972 which saw it formed from a large part of the West Riding of Yorkshire. The county had a population of 2.3 million in the 2011 census making it the fourth-largest by population in England. The largest towns are Huddersfield, Castleford, Batley, Bingley, Pontefract, Halifax, Brighouse, Keighley, Pudsey, Morley and Dewsbury. The three cities of West Yorkshire are Bradford, Leeds and Wakefield.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">West Riding of Yorkshire</span> One of the historic subdivisions of Yorkshire, England

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The Bishop of Bradford is an episcopal title used by a suffragan bishop of the Church of England Diocese of Leeds, in the Province of York, England. The title takes its name after Bradford, a city in West Yorkshire.

The Bishop of Ripon is an episcopal title which takes its name after the city of Ripon in North Yorkshire, England. The bishop is one of the area bishops of the Diocese of Leeds in the Province of York. The area bishop of Ripon has oversight of the archdeaconry of Richmond and Craven, which consists of the deaneries of Bowland, Ewecross, Harrogate, Richmond, Ripon, Skipton, and Wensley.

The Bishop of Wakefield is an episcopal title which takes its name after the city of Wakefield in West Yorkshire, England. The title was first created for a diocesan bishop in 1888, but it was dissolved in 2014. The Bishop of Wakefield is now an area bishop who has oversight of an episcopal area in the Diocese of Leeds.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">Diocese of York</span> Diocese of the Church of England

The Diocese of York is an administrative division of the Church of England, part of the Province of York. It covers the city of York, the eastern part of North Yorkshire, and most of the East Riding of Yorkshire.

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The Diocese of Ripon was a former Church of England diocese, part of the Province of York. Immediately prior to its dissolution, it covered an area in western and northern Yorkshire as well as the south Teesdale area administered by County Durham which is traditionally part of Yorkshire. The cities of Ripon and Leeds were within its boundaries as were the towns of Harrogate, Richmond, Knaresborough, Hawes and Bedale and the surrounding countryside; its northern boundary was the River Tees.

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The Diocese of Bradford is a former Church of England diocese within the Province of York. The diocese covered the area of the City of Bradford, Craven district and the former Sedbergh Rural District now in Cumbria. The seat of the episcopal see was Bradford Cathedral and the bishop was the diocesan Bishop of Bradford.

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<span class="mw-page-title-main">Anglican Diocese of Leeds</span> Diocese of the Church of England

The Anglican Diocese of Leeds is a diocese of the Church of England, in the Province of York. It is the largest diocese in England by area, comprising much of western Yorkshire: almost the whole of West Yorkshire, the western part of North Yorkshire, the town of Barnsley in South Yorkshire, and most of the parts of County Durham, Cumbria and Lancashire which lie within the historic boundaries of Yorkshire. It includes the cities of Leeds, Bradford, Wakefield and Ripon. It was created on 20 April 2014 following a review of the dioceses in Yorkshire and the dissolution of the dioceses of Bradford, Ripon and Leeds, and Wakefield.

The Archdeacon of Craven was a senior ecclesiastical officer within the Diocese of Bradford. The final archdeacon was Paul Slater.

The Archdeacon of Bradford is a senior ecclesiastical officer within the Diocese of Leeds. The archdeaconry was originally created within the now-defunct Diocese of Bradford by Order in Council on 25 February 1921.

The Archdeacon of Pontefract is a senior ecclesiastical officer within the Diocese of Leeds.

The Yorkshire Rugby Football Union is the governing body responsible for rugby union in the historic county of Yorkshire, England. It is one of the constituent bodies of the national Rugby Football Union having formed in 1869, the union was formerly called Yorkshire County Club.

The Bishop of Wakefield was the ordinary of the now-defunct Church of England Diocese of Wakefield in the Province of York. The diocese was based in Wakefield in West Yorkshire, covering the City of Wakefield, Barnsley, Kirklees and Calderdale. The see was centred in the City of Wakefield where the bishop's seat (cathedra) was located in the Cathedral Church of All Saints, a parish church elevated to cathedral status in 1888.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">1952 West Riding County Council election</span>

The 1952 West Riding County Council election was held on Saturday, 5 April 1952. The election took place in the administrative county of the West Riding of Yorkshire, which excluded the county boroughs of Barnsley, Bradford, Dewsbury, Doncaster, Halifax, Huddersfield, Leeds, Rotherham, Sheffield, Wakefield and York. The whole council of ninety-six members was up for election, with each county electoral division returning one councillor.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">1955 West Riding County Council election</span>

The 1955 West Riding County Council election was held on Saturday, 2 April 1955. The election took place in the administrative county of the West Riding of Yorkshire, which excluded the county boroughs of Barnsley, Bradford, Dewsbury, Doncaster, Halifax, Huddersfield, Leeds, Rotherham, Sheffield, Wakefield and York. The whole council of ninety-six members was up for election, with each county electoral division returning one councillor.

References

  1. 1 2 The Transformation Programme – First new diocese for more than 85 years created on April 20 Archived April 20, 2014, at the Wayback Machine (Accessed 19 April 2014)
  2. 1 2 History of the Secular and Diocesan Boundaries in Yorkshire (PDF), Church of England, retrieved 31 January 2012
  3. "No. 25817". The London Gazette . 18 May 1888. p. 2821.
  4. "No. 25876". The London Gazette . 20 November 1888. pp. 6279–6281.
  5. "No. 33248". The London Gazette . 15 February 1927. pp. 1029–1034.
  6. Thinking Anglicans – proposed new diocese for West Yorkshire (Accessed 4 March 2013)
  7. The Church of England – Synod approves new Diocese of Leeds for West Yorkshire and The Dales

Bibliography