Diogenes Allen

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Diogenes Allen
Diogenes Allen.jpg
Born(1932-10-17)October 17, 1932
DiedJanuary 13, 2013(2013-01-13) (aged 80)
Newtown, Bucks County, Pennsylvania
Nationality American
Alma mater University of Kentucky;
St John's College, Oxford;
Yale Divinity School
Known forinterpreter of Simone Weil and Søren Kierkegaard
Awards John Templeton Foundation Awards
Scientific career
Fields Philosophy; Theology
Institutions Princeton Theological Seminary
Influences

Diogenes Allen (October 17, 1932 – January 13, 2013) was an American philosopher and theologian who served as the Stuart Professor of Philosophy at Princeton Theological Seminary. [1] He was an ordained minister in the Presbyterian Church, which he served from 1958. He died on January 13, 2013 in Newtown, Bucks County, Pennsylvania. [2]

Princeton Theological Seminary seminary

Princeton Theological Seminary (PTS) is a private, nonprofit, and independent graduate school of theology in Princeton, New Jersey. Founded in 1812 under the auspices of Archibald Alexander, the General Assembly of the Presbyterian Church, and the College of New Jersey, it is the second-oldest seminary in the United States. It is also the largest of ten seminaries associated with the Presbyterian Church (USA).

Newtown, Bucks County, Pennsylvania Borough in Pennsylvania, United States

Newtown is a borough in Bucks County, Pennsylvania, United States. The population was 2,248 at the 2010 census. It is located just west of the Trenton, New Jersey metropolitan area, and is part of the larger Philadelphia metropolitan area. It is entirely surrounded by Newtown Township, from which it separated in 1838. State Street is the main commercial thoroughfare with wide sidewalks, shops, taverns, and restaurants.

Contents

Early life and education

Allen was born in Lexington, Kentucky, and graduated from the University of Kentucky in 1954. [2] He then began graduate study at Princeton University, but, after being awarded a Rhodes Scholarship, he matriculated to St John's College, Oxford. There he studied philosophy and met his wife Jane, a fellow student.

Lexington, Kentucky Consolidated city-county in Kentucky, United States

Lexington, consolidated with Fayette County and often denoted as Lexington-Fayette, is the second-largest city in Kentucky and the 60th-largest city in the United States. By land area, Lexington is the 28th largest city in the United States. Known as the "Horse Capital of the World," it is the heart of the state's Bluegrass region. It has a nonpartisan mayor-council form of government, with 12 council districts and three members elected at large, with the highest vote-getter designated vice mayor. In the 2018 U.S. Census Estimate, the city's population was 323,780 anchoring a metropolitan area of 516,697 people and a combined statistical area of 746,330 people.

University of Kentucky Public research university in Lexington, KY, USA

The University of Kentucky (UK) is a public co-educational university in Lexington, Kentucky. Founded in 1865 by John Bryan Bowman as the Agricultural and Mechanical College of Kentucky, the university is one of the state's two land-grant universities, the largest college or university in the state, with 30,720 students as of Fall 2015, and the highest ranked research university in the state according to U.S. News and World Report.

Princeton University University in Princeton, New Jersey

Princeton University is a private Ivy League research university in Princeton, New Jersey. Founded in 1746 in Elizabeth as the College of New Jersey, Princeton is the fourth-oldest institution of higher education in the United States and one of the nine colonial colleges chartered before the American Revolution. The institution moved to Newark in 1747, then to the current site nine years later, and renamed itself Princeton University in 1896.

After returning to America, Allen earned a Bachelor of Divinity at Yale Divinity School in 1959. [3] He was called to a pastorate in Windham, New Hampshire, in 1958, and ordained in what is now the Presbyterian Church (USA) the following year. Shortly thereafter he enrolled at Yale University Graduate School to study for a PhD in philosophy, which was awarded in 1965. [2]

In Western universities, a Bachelor of Divinity or Baccalaureate in Divinity is an undergraduate or postgraduate academic degree awarded for a course taken in the study of divinity or related disciplines, such as theology or, rarely, religious studies. In most modern universities, the BD as a first degree is essentially equivalent to a Bachelor of Arts degree with a speciality in divinity. Relatively few institutions award undergraduate Bachelor of Divinity degrees today, and the distinction between institutions that do award such degrees and those that award BA degrees for theological subjects is usually one of bureaucracy rather than curriculum.

Yale Divinity School

The School of Divinity at Yale University, in New Haven, Connecticut, is one of twelve graduate or professional schools within Yale University.

Pastor ordained leader of a Christian congregation

A pastor is an ordained leader of a Christian congregation. A pastor also gives advice and counsel to people from the community or congregation.

University career

Allen began his teaching career in 1964 at York University, Toronto. [2] In 1967, Princeton Theological Seminary offered him the position of associate professor of philosophy, which, he accepted. [2] In 1974, he was appointed to a full professorship there and in 1981 was named Stuart Professor of Philosophy. [2] By the time of his retirement in 2002, he had served the faculty for thirty-five years and had become an authority on Gottfried Leibniz and an influential interpreter of Simone Weil and Søren Kierkegaard. [2]

Simone Weil French philosopher, Christian mystic, and social activist

Simone Adolphine Weil was a French philosopher, mystic, and political activist. The mathematician André Weil was her brother.

Søren Kierkegaard Danish philosopher and theologian, precursor of Existentialism

Søren Aabye Kierkegaard was a Danish philosopher, theologian, poet, social critic and religious author who is widely considered to be the first existentialist philosopher. He wrote critical texts on organized religion, Christendom, morality, ethics, psychology, and the philosophy of religion, displaying a fondness for metaphor, irony and parables. Much of his philosophical work deals with the issues of how one lives as a "single individual", giving priority to concrete human reality over abstract thinking and highlighting the importance of personal choice and commitment. He was against literary critics who defined idealist intellectuals and philosophers of his time, and thought that Swedenborg, Hegel, Fichte, Schelling, Schlegel and Hans Christian Andersen were all "understood" far too quickly by "scholars".

Awards

Diogenes Allen's numerous awards include a Rockefeller Fellowship; a Canada Council Fellowship; research fellowships given by the Association of Theological Schools in the United States and Canada and the Center for Theological Inquiry; a Pew Evangelical Scholarship; and two John Templeton Foundation Awards for Best Courses in Science and Religion.

The Rockefeller Foundation is a private foundation based at 420 Fifth Avenue, New York City. It was established by the six-generation Rockefeller family. The Foundation was started by Standard Oil owner John D. Rockefeller ("Senior"), along with his son John D. Rockefeller Jr. ("Junior"), and Senior's principal oil and gas business and philanthropic advisor, Frederick Taylor Gates, in New York State on May 14, 1913, when its charter was formally accepted by the New York State Legislature. Its stated mission is "promoting the well-being of humanity throughout the world."

The Canada Council for the Arts, commonly called the Canada Council, is a Crown Corporation established in 1957 to act as an arts council of the government of Canada, created to foster and promote the study and enjoyment of, and the production of works in, the arts. It funds Canadian artists and encourages the production of art in Canada. The current board chair of the Canada Council is Pierre Lassonde.

A scholarship is an award of financial aid for a student to further their education. Scholarships are awarded based upon various criteria, which usually reflect the values and purposes of the donor or founder of the award. Scholarship money is not required to be repaid.

He is also the recipient of an Outstanding American Educator Award in 1974; a past member of the executive board of the Society of Christian Philosophers; a co-founder and member of the executive board of the American Weil Society; and a member of the board of directors of the Ecumenical Institute of Canada.

Society of Christian Philosophers

The Society of Christian Philosophers (SCP) was founded in 1978. Past Presidents include William Alston, Robert Merrihew Adams, Alvin Plantinga, Marilyn McCord Adams, George I. Mavrodes, Peter van Inwagen, Nicholas Wolterstorff, Eleonore Stump, C. Stephen Evans, Robert Audi, Linda Zagzebski, and Michael C. Rea. Michael Bergmann of Purdue University is currently President of SCP, Justin McBrayer of Fort Lewis College is Executive Director, and Kevin Timpe of Calvin College is Treasurer.

Publications

See also

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References

  1. Foster, Richard J.; Beebe, Gayle D. (April 2009). Longing for God: Seven Paths of Christian Devotion. InterVarsity Press. pp. 9–. ISBN   978-0-8308-3527-0 . Retrieved 18 August 2011.
  2. 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 "Philosopher and Theologian Diogenes Allen Dies". Princeton Theological Seminary. January 14, 2013. Archived from the original on April 11, 2015. Retrieved 20 June 2015.
  3. "Diogenes Allen '59BD, '65PhD | Obituaries | Yale Alumni Magazine". yalealumnimagazine.com. Retrieved 2019-04-27.