Direct Democracy Party of New Zealand

Last updated
Direct Democracy Party of New Zealand
Leader Kevin Alp
Founded 2005
Dissolved June 30, 2009 (2009-06-30)

The Direct Democracy Party (DDP) of New Zealand (2005-2009) was a political party in New Zealand that promoted greater participation by the people in the decision-making of government. The party's leader was Kelvyn Alp.

A political party is an organized group of people, often with common views, who come together to contest elections and hold power in the government. The party agrees on some proposed policies and programmes, with a view to promoting the collective good or furthering their supporters' interests.

New Zealand Constitutional monarchy in Oceania

New Zealand is a sovereign island country in the southwestern Pacific Ocean. The country geographically comprises two main landmasses—the North Island, and the South Island —and around 600 smaller islands. New Zealand is situated some 2,000 kilometres (1,200 mi) east of Australia across the Tasman Sea and roughly 1,000 kilometres (600 mi) south of the Pacific island areas of New Caledonia, Fiji, and Tonga. Because of its remoteness, it was one of the last lands to be settled by humans. During its long period of isolation, New Zealand developed a distinct biodiversity of animal, fungal, and plant life. The country's varied topography and its sharp mountain peaks, such as the Southern Alps, owe much to the tectonic uplift of land and volcanic eruptions. New Zealand's capital city is Wellington, while its most populous city is Auckland.

Kelvyn Alp is a New Zealand politician and activist. Alp was the leader of the Direct Democracy Party of New Zealand which stood in the 2005 general elections. He also stood for Mayor of Manukau City in 2007. Alp stood in the 2011 Te Tai Tokerau by-election under the OurNZ Party banner receiving 0.5% of the vote. He served in the New Zealand Army from 1995 to 1996.

The party challenged the current monetary system and promoted solutions to what it called "irredeemable debt." [1] It aimed to establish a system of binding referendums (similar to the Landsgemeinde used in parts of Switzerland) for all major decisions. [2] The party also advocated for a New Zealand Constitution to protect and enshrine the rights and freedoms of the people. [3]

A monetary system is the set of institutions by which a government provides money in a country's economy. Modern monetary systems usually consist of the national treasury, the mint, the central banks and commercial banks.

A referendum is a direct vote in which an entire electorate is invited to vote on a particular proposal. This may result in the adoption of a new law. In some countries, it is synonymous with a plebiscite or a vote on a ballot question.

Landsgemeinde

The Landsgemeinde or "cantonal assembly" is a public, non-secret ballot voting system operating by majority rule, which constitutes one of the oldest forms of direct democracy. Still at use – in a few places – at the subnational political level in Switzerland, it was formerly practiced in eight cantons. For practical reasons, the Landsgemeinde has been abolished at the cantonal level in all but two cantons where it still holds the highest political authority: Appenzell Innerrhoden and Glarus. The Landsgemeinde is also convened in some districts of Appenzell Innerrhoden, Grisons and Schwyz to vote on local questions.

In 2005 the Direct Democracy Party was registered as a political party. [4] It fielded 32 party members in the 2005 elections, and won 782 votes (or 0.03% of the total vote), failing to get any MPs into parliament. [5]

The party did not apply for broadcasting funding in 2008, [6] nor did it submit a party list. The official results for the party vote in that year's election recorded no votes for the DDP. [7]

The party's registration was cancelled at its own request on 30 June 2009. [8]

Alp founded the OurNZ Party in 2011.

See also

Kyle Chapman, party member

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References

  1. "Open Letter To The NZ People". Direct Democracy Party. 2007-02-24. Retrieved 2008-06-08.
  2. ""Direct Democracy": Frequently Asked Questions". Direct Democracy Party Of NZ. 2007-08-19. Retrieved 2008-06-08.
  3. "New Zealand Constitution Policy". Direct Democracy Party Of NZ. Retrieved 2008-06-08.[ permanent dead link ]
  4. "More political parties seeking party vote". New Zealand Electoral Commission. 2005-08-24. Archived from the original on 16 October 2008. Retrieved 2008-06-08.
  5. "2005 Election: Official Count Results -- Overall Status". New Zealand Electoral Commission. 2005. Archived from the original on 10 May 2008. Retrieved 2008-06-08.
  6. "Commission to hear parties on broadcasting time and funding". New Zealand Electoral Commission. 24 April 2008. Archived from the original on 15 October 2008. Retrieved 8 June 2008.
  7. Chief Electoral Office: Official Count Results: Overall status
  8. "Cancellation of Registration of Party". Elections.org.nz. Retrieved 16 January 2017.