Discordian calendar

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The Discordian or Erisian calendar is an alternative calendar used by some adherents of Discordianism. It is specified on page 00034 of the Principia Discordia . [1]

A calendar is a system of organizing days for social, religious, commercial or administrative purposes. This is done by giving names to periods of time, typically days, weeks, months and years. A date is the designation of a single, specific day within such a system. A calendar is also a physical record of such a system. A calendar can also mean a list of planned events, such as a court calendar or a partly or fully chronological list of documents, such as a calendar of wills.

Discordianism religion and parody religion

Discordianism is a paradigm based upon the book Principia Discordia, written by Greg Hill with Kerry Wendell Thornley in 1963, the two working under the pseudonyms Malaclypse the Younger and Omar Khayyam Ravenhurst. According to self-proclaimed "crackpot historian" Adam Gorightly, Discordianism was founded as a parody religion. Many outside observers still regard Discordianism as a parody religion, although some of its adherents may utilize it as a legitimate religion or as a metaphor for a governing philosophy.

<i>Principia Discordia</i> Discordian religious text

The Principia Discordia is a Discordian religious text written by Greg Hill with Kerry Wendell Thornley. The first edition was printed using Jim Garrison's Xerox printer in 1963. The second edition was published under the title Principia Discordia or How The West Was Lost in a limited edition of five copies in 1965. The phrase Principia Discordia, reminiscent of Newton's Principia Mathematica, is presumably intended to mean Discordant Principles, or Principles of Discordance.

Contents

The Discordian year 1 YOLD is 1166 BC. (Elsewhere in the Principia Discordia, it is mentioned that the Curse of Greyface occurred in 1166 BC, so this is presumably related to the start-date of the calendar. [2] ) As a reference, AD 2019 is 3185 YOLD (Year of Our Lady of Discord). The abbreviation "YOLD" is not used in the Principia, though the phrase "Year of Our Lady of Discord" is mentioned once. [3]

Composition

As described in the Principia Discordia, the Discordian calendar has five 73-day seasons: Chaos, Discord, Confusion, Bureaucracy, and The Aftermath. The Discordian year is aligned with the Gregorian calendar and begins on January 1, thus Chaos 1, 3185 YOLD is January 1, 2019 Gregorian.

Bureaucracy refers to both a body of non-elective government officials and an administrative policy-making group. Historically, a bureaucracy was a government administration managed by departments staffed with non-elected officials. Today, bureaucracy is the administrative system governing any large institution, whether publicly owned or privately owned. The public administration in many countries is an example of a bureaucracy, but so is the centralized hierarchical structure of a business firm.

2019 (MMXIX) is the current year, and is a common year starting on Tuesday of the Gregorian calendar, the 2019th year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 19th year of the 3rd millennium, the 19th year of the 21st century, and the 10th and last year of the 2010s decade.

The Erisian week consists of five days: Sweetmorn, Boomtime, Pungenday, Prickle-Prickle, and Setting Orange. The days of the week are named after the five basic Discordian elements: Sweet, Boom, Pungent, Prickle, and Orange. There are 73 of these weeks per year and every year begins with Sweetmorn.

Every fourth year in the Discordian calendar, starting in 2 YOLD, an extra day is inserted between Chaos 59 and Chaos 60 called St. Tib's Day. This is because 4 years + 1 day = 5, a holy number, but the Discordian leap year also coincides with the Gregorian one. The result of this is that any given day of the year in the Discordian calendar may be taken to correspond to the same day of the year in the Gregorian calendar, and vice versa, although some users of the calendar believe that it is tied to the Julian calendar and so will diverge from the Gregorian in 3266 YOLD (AD 2100). St. Tib's day is considered outside the Discordian week.

A leap year is a calendar year containing one additional day added to keep the calendar year synchronized with the astronomical or seasonal year. Because seasons and astronomical events do not repeat in a whole number of days, calendars that have the same number of days in each year drift over time with respect to the event that the year is supposed to track. By inserting an additional day or month into the year, the drift can be corrected. A year that is not a leap year is called a common year.

The Gregorian calendar is the most widely used civil calendar in the world. It is named after Pope Gregory XIII, who introduced it in October 1582. The calendar spaces leap years to make the average year 365.2425 days long, approximating the 365.2422-day tropical year that is determined by the Earth's revolution around the Sun. The rule for leap years is:

Every year that is exactly divisible by four is a leap year, except for years that are exactly divisible by 100, but these centurial years are leap years if they are exactly divisible by 400. For example, the years 1700, 1800, and 1900 are not leap years, but the year 2000 is.

The Julian calendar, proposed by Julius Caesar in 46 BC, was a reform of the Roman calendar. It took effect on 1 January 45 BC, by edict. It was the predominant calendar in the Roman world, most of Europe, and in European settlements in the Americas and elsewhere, until it was refined and gradually replaced by the Gregorian calendar, promulgated in 1582 by Pope Gregory XIII.

There are Apostle Holydays on the 5th day of each season, named after the 5 Discordian apostles: Mungday, for Hung Mung; Mojoday, for Dr Van Van Mojo; Syaday, for Sri Syadasti; Zaraday, for Zarathud; and Maladay, for Malaclypse the Elder. There are also Season Holydays on the 50th of each season: Chaoflux, Discoflux, Confuflux, Bureflux, and Afflux.

HolydayDiscordian calendarGregorian calendar
MungdayChaos 5 January 5
ChaofluxChaos 50 February 19
St. Tib's DaySt. Tib's Day February 29
MojodayDiscord 5 March 19
DiscofluxDiscord 50 May 3
SyadayConfusion 5 May 31
ConfufluxConfusion 50 July 15
ZaradayBureaucracy 5 August 12
BurefluxBureaucracy 50 September 26
MaladayThe Aftermath 5 October 24
AffluxThe Aftermath 50 December 8

Only these eleven dates are named in the Principia Discordia; however, Discordians have felt free to invent other holidays which have become popular to varying degrees. Some of these include Discordians for Jesus/Love Your Neighbor Day (March 25/Discord 11); Jake Day (April 6/Discord 23 or occasionally May 23/Discord 70), a day to send tongue-in-cheek letters, emails or faxes to an official or bureaucracy; Saint Camping's Day (May 21/Discord 68), a day to make End of Days predictions and share them in social media; Towel Day (May 25/Discord 72); Mid Year's Day (July 2/ Confusion 37); X-Day (July 5/Confusion 40); and Multiversal Underwear Day (August 10/Bureaucracy 3). [4]

March 25 is the 84th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. There are 281 days remaining until the end of the year.

April 6 is the 96th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. There are 269 days remaining until the end of the year.

May 23 is the 143rd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. There are 222 days remaining until the end of the year.

Implementations

Ddate, is a program that prints the current date in the Discordian calendar. It was a part of the util-linux package containing basic system utilities. [5] As such, it had been included at least since 1994 in nearly all Linux distributions. In August 2011 however, one of the maintainers of util-linux made ddate optional, and by default omitted. [6] In October 2012, ddate was completely removed from util-linux. [7] The ddate program now has an upstream source. [8] There was some controversy, [9] [10] but in the end, anyone wishing to reintroduce ddate to a distribution will have to create a separate package based on the new upstream. This has been done for Debian, FreeBSD, Fedora Linux, [11] and Gentoo Linux [12] for example.

There are many other programs with similar functionality, such as HodgePodge, [13] an Android widget. Discordian-calendar is an implementation using Java 8's date and time classes. [14]

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References

  1. Malaclypse the Younger, Principia Discordia, Page 00034
  2. Malaclypse the Younger, Principia Discordia, Page 00042
  3. Malaclypse the Younger, Principia Discordia, Page 00053
  4. "Holydays from the Ek-sen-trik-kuh Discordia". April 25, 2009.
  5. "util-linux: Miscellaneous utilities for Linux, 2.12j". Archived from the original on February 13, 2010. Retrieved 2007-12-08.CS1 maint: BOT: original-url status unknown (link)
  6. "build-sys: add --enable-ddate". kernel.org Git commit log. Karel Zak. Retrieved 2014-05-08.
  7. "ddate: remove from util-linux". kernel.org Git commit log. Karel Zak. Retrieved 2014-05-08.
  8. "The ddate source ripped out of util-linux". GitHub/bo0ts/ddate. Philipp Moeller (bo0ts). Retrieved 2014-05-08.
  9. "Bug 823156 – Reintroduce ddate into Fedora". RedHat bug tracker. RedHat . Retrieved 2014-05-08.
  10. "What's new in Fedora 17 (The H)". Linux Weekly News . Retrieved 2014-05-08.
  11. "Fedora ddate Package page". Fedora Packages Web App. Fedora Project . Retrieved 2014-05-08.
  12. "app-misc/ddate". Gentoo CVS repository. Gentoo Foundation. Retrieved 2014-05-08.
  13. "HodgePodge Discordian calendar Android App". Google Play . Google . Retrieved 2013-01-02.
  14. "discordian-calendar". Rob Fletcher. Retrieved 2014-12-13.