Districts of Serbia

Last updated
Districts of Serbia
Окрузи Србије
Okruzi Srbije
Districts of Serbia in color.jpg
Category Unitary state
Location Republic of Serbia
Number24 Districts (29 including Kosovo) [lower-alpha 1] + City of Belgrade
Populations91,754 (Toplica) – 1,687,132 (Belgrade)
Areas1,248 km2 (482 sq mi) (Podunavlje) – 6,140 km2 (2,370 sq mi) (Zlatibor)
Government
Subdivisions

An okrug is one of the first-level administrative divisions of Serbia, corresponding to a " province " in many other countries (Serbia also claims two autonomous provinces). The term okrug (pl. okruzi) literally means "encircling", and can also be translated as "county", though it is generally rendered by the Serbian government as "district".

Contents

The Serbian local government reforms of 1992, going into effect the following year, created 29 districts, [1] with the City of Belgrade holding similar authority. Following the controversial 2008 Kosovo declaration of independence, new districts were created by the so-called Republic of Kosovo government; the Serbian government does not recognize these districts.

The districts of Serbia are generally named after historical and geographical regions, though some, such as the Pčinja District and the Nišava District, are named after local rivers. Their areas and populations vary to a large extent, ranging from the relatively-small Podunavlje District to the much larger Zlatibor District.

As regional centers of state authority, the districts have little room for self-government and do not have local flags. Still, they are each run by a commissioner as well as cooperating municipal leaders. The districts can be further divided into cities and municipalities.

Definition

The territorial organisation of Serbia is regulated by the Law on Territorial Organization, adopted by the National Assembly on 29 December 2007. [2] According to the Law, the territorial organization of the republic comprises municipalities and cities, the City of Belgrade with special status, and autonomous provinces. Districts are not mentioned in this law but are defined by the Government of Serbia's Enactment of 29 January 1992. They are defined as the districts as "regional centers of state authority", enacting affairs run by the relevant Ministries.

Serbia is divided into 29 districts (8 in Šumadija and Western Serbia, 9 in Southern and Eastern Serbia, 7 in Vojvodina and 5 in Kosovo and Metohija), plus the City of Belgrade. The City of Belgrade is not part of any district, but has a special status very similar to that of a district.

Districts of Kosovo

Serbian laws treat Kosovo and Metohija as integral part of Serbia (Autonomous Province of Kosovo and Metohija). The Enactment defines five districts on the territory of Kosovo. [2] But, since 1999, following the Kosovo War Kosovo is under United Nations' administration of UNMIK. In 2000, the UNMIK administration changed territorial organisation on the territory of Kosovo. All five districts were abolished, and seven new districts were created. Serbian government does not recognize this move, and accepts only five pre-2000 districts.

List of districts

Šumadija and Western Serbia

DistrictSeatArea
in km2
Population 2011Population
per km2
Municipalities and citiesSettlements
Kolubara District
(Kolubarski okrug)
Kolubarski okrug.PNG
Valjevo 2,474174,22870.4218
Mačva District
(Mačvanski okrug)
Macvanski okrug.PNG
Šabac 3,268297,77891.1228
Moravica District
(Moravički okrug)
Moravicki okrug.PNG
Čačak 3,016212,14970.3206
Pomoravlje District
(Pomoravski okrug)
Pomoravski okrug.PNG
Jagodina 2,614212,83984.8191
Rasina District
(Rasinski okrug)
Rasinski okrug.PNG
Kruševac 2,667240,46390.2296
Raška District
(Raški okrug)
Raski okrug.PNG
Kraljevo 3,918300,10276.6359
Šumadija District
(Šumadijski okrug)
Sumadijski okrug.PNG
Kragujevac 2,387290,900121.8174
Zlatibor District
(Zlatiborski okrug)
Zlatiborski okrug.PNG
Užice 6,140284,72946.4438

Southern and Eastern Serbia

DistrictSeatArea
in km2
Population 2011Population
per km2
Municipalities and citiesSettlements
Bor District
(Borski okrug)
Borski okrug.PNG
Bor 3,507123,84835.390
Braničevo District
(Braničevski okrug)
Branicevski okrug.PNG
Požarevac 3,865180,48046.7189
Jablanica District
(Jablanički okrug)
Jablanicki okrug.PNG
Leskovac 2,769215,46377.8336
Nišava District
(Nišavski okrug)
Nisavski okrug.PNG
Niš 2,729373,404136.8285
Pčinja District
(Pčinjski okrug)
Pcinjski okrug.PNG
Vranje 3,520158,71745.1363
Pirot District
(Pirotski okrug)
Pirotski okrug.PNG
Pirot 2,76192,27733.4214
Podunavlje District
(Podunavski okrug)
Podunavski okrug.PNG
Smederevo 1,248198,184158.858
Toplica District
(Toplički okrug)
Toplicki okrug.PNG
Prokuplje 2,23190,60040.6267
Zaječar District
(Zaječarski okrug)
Zajecarski okrug.PNG
Zaječar 3,623118,29532.6173

Vojvodina

Districts in Vojvodina. M vojvodina03 dist.png
Districts in Vojvodina.
DistrictSeatArea
in km2
Population 2011Population
per km2
Municipalities and citiesSettlements
Central Banat District
(Srednjebanatski okrug)
Srednjebanatski okrug.PNG
Zrenjanin 3,256186,85157.455
North Bačka District
(Severnobački okrug)
Severnobacki okrug.PNG
Subotica 1,784185,552104.045
North Banat District
(Severnobanatski okrug)
Severnobanatski okrug.PNG
Kikinda 2,329146,69063.050
South Bačka District
(Južnobački okrug)
Juznobacki okrug.PNG
Novi Sad 4,016615,371151.377
South Banat District
(Južnobanatski okrug)
Juznobanatski okrug.PNG
Pančevo 4,245291,32768.694
Srem District
(Sremski okrug)
Sremski okrug.PNG
Sremska Mitrovica 3,486311,05389.2109
West Bačka District
(Zapadnobački okrug)
Zapadnobacki okrug.PNG
Sombor 2,420187,58177.537

Kosovo and Metohija

Districts in Kosovo and Metohija. M kosovo02.png
Districts in Kosovo and Metohija.

Five of Serbian Districts are on the territory of Kosovo, comprising 28 municipalities and 1 city. In 2000, UNMIK created 7 new districts [ citation needed ] and 30 municipalities. Serbia does not exercise sovereignty over this polity. For the UNMIK districts and the districts of Kosovo, see Districts of Kosovo. Because the Serbian government has no control over Kosovo since it declared independence, it was not included in Serbia's 2011 census. For current demographic information about Kosovo, see Kosovo's 2011 census.

DistrictSeatArea
in km2
Population 2002Population
per km2
Municipalities and cities
Kosovo District
(Kosovski okrug)
Kosovski okrug.PNG
Pristina 3,310672,292203.1
Kosovo-Pomoravlje District
(Kosovsko-Pomoravski okrug)
Kosovsko-Pomoravski okrug.PNG
Gnjilane 1,389217,726156.8
Kosovska Mitrovica District
(Kosovskomitrovički okrug)
Kosovskomitrovicki okrug.PNG
Kosovska Mitrovica 2,053275,904134.4
Peć District
(Pećki okrug)
Pecki okrug.PNG
Peć 2,459414,187168.4
Prizren District
(Prizrenski okrug)
Prizrenski okrug.PNG
Prizren 2,196376,085171.3

See also

Notes and references

Notes

  1. Kosovo is the subject of a territorial dispute between the Republic of Kosovo and the Republic of Serbia. The Republic of Kosovo unilaterally declared independence on 17 February 2008. Serbia continues to claim it as part of its own sovereign territory. The two governments began to normalise relations in 2013, as part of the 2013 Brussels Agreement. Kosovo is currently (this note self-updates) recognized as an independent state by 98 out of the 193 United Nations member states. In total, 113 UN member states recognized Kosovo at some point, of which 15 later withdrew their recognition.

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Administrative divisions of Serbia and Montenegro

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The political status of Kosovo, also known as the Kosovo question, is the subject of a long-running political and territorial dispute between the Serbian government and the Government of Kosovo, stemming from the breakup of Yugoslavia (1991–92) and the ensuing Kosovo War (1998–99). In 1999 the administration of the province was handed on an interim basis to the United Nations under the terms of UNSCR 1244 which ended the Kosovo conflict of that year. That resolution reaffirmed the sovereignty of Serbia over Kosovo but required the UN administration to promote the establishment of 'substantial autonomy and self-government' for Kosovo pending a 'final settlement' for negotiation between the parties.

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Autonomous Province of Kosovo and Metohija Autonomous province in Serbia

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The 2008 Serbian local elections in Kosovo were held on 11 May 2008, together with Serbia's parliamentary elections and elections in Vojvodina. UNMIK authorities have criticized Serbia organizing

Assembly of the Community of Municipalities, Autonomous Province of Kosovo and Metohija

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Statistical regions of Serbia subnational regions

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The Governance of Kosovo operates in the context of the disputed territory of Kosovo.

State Road 31 (Serbia)

State Road 31 is an IB-class road in western and southern Serbia, connecting Raška with Serbia/Kosovo-North Macedonia border at Đeneral Janković. It is located in Šumadija and Western Serbia and Kosovo and Metohija regions. The section between Jarinje and Đeneral Janković is under control of Kosovo government and UNMIK.

State Road 32 (Serbia)

State Road 32 is an IB-class road in western and southern Serbia, connecting Ribariće with Kosovska Mitrovica. It is located in Šumadija and Western Serbia and Kosovo and Metohija regions. The section between Vitkoviće and Kosovska Mitrovica is under control of Kosovo government and UNMIK.

State Road 39 (Serbia)

State Road 39 is an IB-class road in eastern and southern Serbia, connecting Pirot with Montenegro at Čakor. It is located in Southern and Eastern Serbia and Kosovo and Metohija regions. The section between Mutivode and Čakor is controlled by Kosovo government and UNMIK.

State Road 41 (Serbia)

State Road 41 is an IB-class road in southern Serbia, connecting Bujanovac with Štimlje. It is located in Southern and Eastern Serbia and Kosovo and Metohija regions. The section between Končulj and Štimlje is controlled by Kosovo government and UNMIK.

State Road 42 (Serbia)

State Road 42 is an IB-class road in southern Serbia, connecting Čukarka with Čaglavica. It is located in Southern and Eastern Serbia and Kosovo and Metohija regions. The section between Depče and Čaglavica is controlled by Kosovo government and UNMIK.

State Road 45 (Serbia)

State Road 45 is an IB-class road in southern Serbia, connecting Dolac with Morina. It is located in Kosovo and Metohija. The road is controlled by Kosovo government and UNMIK.

References

  1. "Facts about Serbia". Government of Serbia . Retrieved 2008-09-29.
  2. 1 2 "Zakon o teritorijalnoj organizaciji Srbije" (in Serbian). Parliament of Serbia.[ permanent dead link ]

Sources