Dixon, California

Last updated

City of Dixon
Aerial view of Dixon, California.jpg
Aerial view of Dixon
Nickname(s): 
Purple Heart City, [1] Dairy City [2] [3]
Solano County California Incorporated and Unincorporated areas Dixon Highlighted 0619402.svg
Location of Dixon in Solano County, California
Usa edcp relief location map.png
Red pog.svg
City of Dixon
Location in the United States
Coordinates: 38°26′57″N121°49′37″W / 38.44917°N 121.82694°W / 38.44917; -121.82694 Coordinates: 38°26′57″N121°49′37″W / 38.44917°N 121.82694°W / 38.44917; -121.82694
Country United States
State California
County Solano
Incorporated March 30, 1878 [4]
Government
   Mayor Steve Bird [5]
   city manager Jim Lindley [6]
   State senator Bill Dodd (D) [7]
   Assemblymember Cecilia Aguiar-Curry (D) [7]
   U. S. rep. John Garamendi (D) [8]
Area
[9]
  Total7.20 sq mi (18.64 km2)
  Land7.10 sq mi (18.39 km2)
  Water0.10 sq mi (0.25 km2)  1.36%
Elevation62 ft (19 m)
Population
 (2020)
  Total18,988
  Density2,674.37/sq mi (1,032.53/km2)
Time zone UTC−8 (Pacific)
  Summer (DST) UTC−7 (PDT)
ZIP code
95620
Area code 707
FIPS code 06-19402
GNIS feature IDs 1655973, 2410343
Website www.cityofdixon.us

Dixon is a city in northern Solano County, California, United States, located 23 miles (37 km) from the state capital, Sacramento. It has a hot-summer mediterranean climate on the Köppen climate classification scale. Its population was 18,988 at the 2020 census. [11] Other nearby cities include Vacaville, Winters, Davis, Woodland, and Rio Vista.

Contents

History

Silveyville Masons Lodge 201 built in 1884 in Dixon, California Silveyville Masons Lodge 201 built in 1884 in Dixon, California.jpg
Silveyville Masons Lodge 201 built in 1884 in Dixon, California

The first semi-permanent European settlement to develop in the Dixon area emerged during the California Gold Rush of the mid-19th century when the community of Silveyville was founded in 1852 by Elijah Silvey [12] as a halfway point between the Pacific coast and the rich gold fields of Sacramento along a route commonly traveled by miners. In 1868, Central Pacific railroad came through the area and missed Silveyville by a few miles. [13] As a result, local leaders decided to physically relocate Silveyville closer to the tracks in order to enjoy the benefits of commerce and travel. One of the first buildings that still stands in Dixon from the 1871 move is the Dixon Methodist Church located at 209 N. Jefferson Street. [14]

Originally, the city was named "Dicksville" after Thomas Dickson who donated 10 acres of his land for the construction of a railroad depot following the completion of the tracks and subsequent relocation of Silveyville to the now-Dixon area. [12] However, when the first rail shipment of merchandise arrived from San Francisco in 1872, it was mistakenly addressed to "Dixon"—a name that has been used since, mainly out of simplicity. [12] [14] Up to now, the urban landscape of the town can be seen to have developed mostly in between the railroad tracks and Interstate-80.

Dixon City Hall Dixon City Hall.jpg
Dixon City Hall

As of 2022 the Dixon city council consists of Steve Bird, Mayor, Scott Pederson, Vice Mayor, representing District 1, Jim Ernest, representing District 2, Kevin Johnson, representing District 3, and Don Hendershot, representing District 4. [15]

The city operates a municipal police and fire department, and water system & wastewater treatment plant.

Geography

Dixon is located at 38°26′57″N121°49′37″W / 38.44917°N 121.82694°W / 38.44917; -121.82694 (38.449108, -121.826872). [16]

According to the United States Census Bureau, the city has a total area of 7.1 square miles (18 km2), of which, 7.0 square miles (18 km2) of it is land and 0.1 square miles (0.26 km2) of it (1.36%) is water.

Demographics

Historical population
CensusPop.
1870 317
1890 1,082
1900 788−27.2%
1910 8274.9%
1920 92612.0%
1930 1,0008.0%
1940 1,10810.8%
1950 1,71454.7%
1960 2,97073.3%
1970 4,43249.2%
1980 7,54170.1%
1990 10,40137.9%
2000 16,10354.8%
2010 18,35114.0%
2020 18,9883.5%
U.S. Decennial Census [17]

2010

Luke's Lounge and Olde Vets Hall on First Street in downtown Dixon, California Luke's Lounge and Olde Vets Hall on First Street in downtown Dixon, California.jpg
Luke's Lounge and Olde Vets Hall on First Street in downtown Dixon, California

The 2010 United States Census [18] reported that Dixon had a population of 18,351. The population density was 2,587.7 inhabitants per square mile (999.1/km2). The racial makeup of Dixon was 13,023 (71.0%) White, 562 (3.1%) African American, 184 (1.0%) Native American, 671 (3.7%) Asian, 58 (0.3%) Pacific Islander, 2,838 (15.5%) from other races, and 1,015 (5.5%) from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 7,426 persons (40.5%).

The Census reported that 100% of the population lived in households.

There were 5,856 households, out of which 2,773 (47.4%) had children under the age of 18 living in them, 3,550 (60.6%) were opposite-sex married couples living together, 790 (13.5%) had a female householder with no husband present, 339 (5.8%) had a male householder with no wife present. There were 327 (5.6%) unmarried opposite-sex partnerships, and 26 (0.4%) same-sex married couples or partnerships. 867 households (14.8%) were made up of individuals, and 301 (5.1%) had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 3.13. There were 4,679 families (79.9% of all households); the average family size was 3.47.

The population was spread out, with 5,349 people (29.1%) under the age of 18, 1,816 people (9.9%) aged 18 to 24, 5,026 people (27.4%) aged 25 to 44, 4,608 people (25.1%) aged 45 to 64, and 1,552 people (8.5%) who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 33.3 years. For every 100 females, there were 97.8 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 94.8 males.

There were 6,172 housing units at an average density of 870.3 per square mile (336.0/km2), of which 3,902 (66.6%) were owner-occupied, and 1,954 (33.4%) were occupied by renters. The homeowner vacancy rate was 2.0%; the rental vacancy rate was 5.2%. 12,149 people (66.2% of the population) lived in owner-occupied housing units and 6,201 people (33.8%) lived in rental housing units.

2000

Midway at the Dixon May Fair Midway at the Dixon May Fair.jpg
Midway at the Dixon May Fair

As of the census [19] of 2000, there were 16,103 people, 5,073 households, and 4,164 families residing in the city. The population density was 2,434.1 inhabitants per square mile (939.8/km2). There were 5,172 housing units at an average density of 781.8 per square mile (301.9/km2). The racial makeup of the city was 70.51% White, 1.93% Black or African American, 0.99% Native American, 3.11% Asian, 0.30% Pacific Islander, 17.87% from other races, and 5.29% from two or more races. 33.62% of the population were Hispanic or Latino of any race.

There were 5,073 households, out of which 47.8% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 67.0% were married couples living together, 9.7% had a female householder with no husband present, and 17.9% were non-families. 13.0% of all households were made up of individuals, and 4.5% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 3.17 and the average family size was 3.45.

In the city, the population is concentrated among adults 25 to 44 (32.2%) and children under age 18 (32%). Only 8.5% of the population is aged 18 to 24; 20.0% from 45 to 64; and 7.2% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 32 years. For every 100 females, there were 100.3 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 97.8 males.

The median income for a household in the city was $54,472, and the median income for a family was $58,849. Males had a median income of $42,286 versus $30,378 for females. The per capita income for the city was $20,139. About 5.2% of families and 8.1% of the population were below the poverty line, including 9.1% of those under age 18 and 6.6% of those age 65 or over.

Notable sites

Dixon Carnegie Library Dixon Carnegie Library, 135 E. B St., Dixon, CA 5-4-2013 6-53-06 PM.JPG
Dixon Carnegie Library

The Jackson Fay Brown House and the Dixon Carnegie library are on the National Register of Historic Places. [20]

As of 2014, Dixon residents Matt and Mark Cooley, owners of Cool Patch Pumpkins, hold the Guinness World Record for "largest maze, temporary corn/crop maze". [21] [22] The maze measured 163,853.83 m2 or 40.489 acres. [23] In 2012, Cool Patch Pumpkins broke its own record with a 53-acre maze. [24] In 2014 Cool Patch Pumpkins again broke its own record by growing a 60-acre maze. [25]

A Milk Farm Restaurant sign, measuring 100 feet tall, [3] was built in May 1963 [3] and still stands today at the intersection of State Route 113 and Interstate 80. [26]

Dixon is home to the Dixon May Fair, California's oldest fair. [27] [28] The fair began in 1885 as a May Day celebration and predates the Solano County Fair which first occurred in 1949. [29] A stage on the fairground was named in honor of country singer Jon Pardi, [30] who grew up in Dixon.

Notable people

Transportation

Dixon Arch in downtown along California State Route 113 Dixon Arch in downtown.jpg
Dixon Arch in downtown along California State Route 113
Milk Farm Sign along Interstate 80 in Dixon Dixon-California-Milk-Farm-Sign.png
Milk Farm Sign along Interstate 80 in Dixon

Interstate 80 and California State Route 113 pass through Dixon.

The Union Pacific Railroad mainline between Oakland and Sacramento also passes through Dixon. [2] This line was owned by Southern Pacific Railroad until its merger with Union Pacific on September 11, 1996. The track was constructed in 1868 by the California Pacific Railroad.

Amtrak Capitol Corridor also passes through Dixon over the UP mainline but the nearest station stops are at Davis and Fairfield–Vacaville. Amtrak's California Zephyr and Coast Starlight also pass through Dixon without stopping. [2]

In 2006, the City of Dixon finished construction on a train station near downtown Dixon. [2] However, there are currently no scheduled stops at the station. The building has, for the time being, been converted to the city's Chamber of Commerce. [2]

The town has public transit in Dixon Readi-Ride a dial-a-ride shuttlebus service. Dixon Park & Ride is a bus station in Dixon. [31] It is served by Fairfield and Suisun Transit route 30 that runs between Fairfield Transportation Center and downtown Sacramento. [32] Dixon Readi-Ride a dial-a-ride service also stops here. [33] It has 89 parking spots. The bus service lasts approximately 10 hours per day on route 30. [34]

Economy

Top employers

According to the city's 2019 Comprehensive Annual Financial Report, [35] the top employers in the city are:

#Employer# of Employees
1 Dixon Unified School District 470
2Altec Industries300
3 Walmart 292
4 Cardinal Health 230
5Dixon Canning (Campbell's)200
6Basalite194
7Superior Packing158
8City of Dixon117
9Gold Star Foods100
10First Northern Bank74

Dixon was the home of the Gymboree Corporation's only distribution center prior to the bankruptcy and closing of the company in 2019. [36]

Media

The Dixon Independent Voice was founded in 1993 (first as The Dixon Newspaper) [37] and is the main paper of circulation today. [38] It is published weekly and is owned by Messenger Publishing Group. [39] The Dixon Tribune newspaper was founded November 14, 1874. [12] Today it is published thrice a week and owned by Gibson Radio and Publishing. [40]

Historically, the Voice of America ran a shortwave transmitter site that was formerly owned and operated by NBC. NBC built the site in 1944, [41] and it broadcast under the call signs KNBA, KNBH, KNBI, KNBC, and KNBX. [42] The station was closed between September 2, 1979 and October 1, 1983, and briefly reopened for Spanish language broadcasting until 1988. [42] [43] The station served as a relay to both NBC International programming overseas, and as a relay of KNBR and its programming overseas, mostly the Pacific area. [44] There is also a military transmission site, the Dixon Naval Radio Transmitter Facility. [45]

Education

John Knight Middle School John Knight Middle School.jpg
John Knight Middle School

Dixon is served by the Dixon Unified School District, and also has a few private educational institutions.

High schools

Middle schools

Elementary schools

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References

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  2. 1 2 3 4 5 Bizjak, Tony (November 29, 2014). "Dixon's downtown depot: Will the train ever stop here?". The Sacramento Bee. Archived from the original on January 13, 2019. Retrieved August 23, 2022.
  3. 1 2 3 Lucas, Greg (March 21, 2004). "DIXON / Inventor hopes grand plan to revive venerable I-80 roadside stop will fly / Milk Farm sign lured weary travelers for generations, but it's all that remains of longtime favorite". SFGate. Retrieved August 23, 2022.
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