Domun Railway

Last updated
Domun Railway Co. Ltd.
Overview
Native name도문철도주식회사 (Domun Cheoldo Jusikhoesa)
図們鉄道株式会社 (Tomon Tetsudō Kabushiki Kaisha)
Route map
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Domun Railway main line
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Domun Railway secondary lines
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other railways
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0.0Hoeryeong
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0.9Sinhoeryeong
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5.3Bongui
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3.7Geumsaeng
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10.6Yuseon
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Geungsim-dong
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9.4Goryeongjin
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14.8
0.0
Sinhakpo
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BSicon HST orange.svg
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8.6Secheon
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17.8Hakpo
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14.4Jungbong
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27.2Sinjeon
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33.6Ganpyeong
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40.5Sangsambong
("Upper Sambong")
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43.7Hasambong
("Lower Sambong")
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52.8
0.0
Jongseong
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58.0Soam
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15.6Tongpo
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64.0
0.0
Donggwanjin
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11.5Seongpyeong

The Tomon Railway Company (Japanese: 図們鉄道株式会社, Tomon Tetsudo Kabushiki Kaisha; Korean: 도문철도주식회사, Domun Cheoldo Jusikhoesa), was a privately owned railway company in Japanese-occupied Korea.

Contents

History

The Tomon Railway's line ran from Kainei to Tōkanchin, and was opened in three stages: the KaineiJōsanpō section (40.4 km (25.1 mi)) was completed on 5 January 1920, the Jōsanpō–Shōjō section (9.1 km (5.7 mi)) on 1 December 1922, and the Shōjō–Tōkanchin section (8.2 km (5.1 mi)) on 1 November 1924. [1]

The narrow-gauge Tiantu Railway, opened in 1923, [2] signed a cross-border operational agreement with the Tomon Railway on 26 June 1926, [3] after which a bridge across the Tumen River between Jōsanpō and Kaishantun was opened on 30 September 1927. [2]

The last line to be opened by the Tomon Railway was the 10.6 km (6.6 mi) Kainei Colliery Line from Kainei to Keirin, which was opened on 11 August 1928. [4]

This line was nationalised on 1 April 1929, becoming the West Domun Line of the Chōsen Government Railway (Sentetsu). [1] Subsequently, merged with Sentetsu's East Tomon Line (Tōkanchin–Yūki), the management of the entire line was transferred to the South Manchuria Railway; at that time, the merged Tomon Line was added to the existing (Genzan-Seishin) Kankyō Line. [5] In 1933 the Manchukuo National Railway bought the Tiantu Railway, converting it to standard gauge to make a shorter, more direct line from Kaishantun to Chaoyangchuan on the MNR's Jingtu Line to Xinjing, opening the new line for use at the end of March 1934. [2]

After the end of the Pacific War, the Provisional People’s Committee for North Korea nationalised all railways in the Soviet zone of occupation on 10 August 1946, and following the establishment of North Korea, the Korean State Railway was created. [6] After the end of the Korean War, the restructuring of the North Korean railway system, including the rearrangement of rail lines, led to the Hoeryeong–Sambong line becoming part of the Korean State Railway's Hambuk Line running from Cheongjin to Rajin via Namyang. [7]

Rolling stock

Little is known about the Domun Railway's motive power; however, it is known that four 2-6-2T tank locomotives operated by the Domun Railway became Sentetsu's Pureko- and Purero-class locomotives after nationalisation of the company.

Network

Main line
DistanceStation name
Total; kmS2S; kmTranscribed, KoreanTranscribed, Japanese Hunminjeongeum Hanja/Kanji ConnectionsOpened
0.00.0HoeryeongKainei회령會寧Hoeryeong Colliery Line5 January 1920
0.90.9SinhoeryeongShinkainei신회령新会寧5 January 1920
3.72.8GeumsaengKinsei금생金生5 January 1920
9.45.7GoryeongjinKōreichin고령진高嶺鎮5 January 1920
14.85.4SinhakpoShinkakuho신학포新鶴浦Secheon Line5 January 1920
17.82.9HakpoKakuho학포鶴浦5 January 1920
27.29.4SinjeonShinden신전新田5 January 1920
33.66.4GanpyeongKanpei간평間坪5 January 1920
40.56.9SangsambongJōsanpō상삼봉上三峰 Tiantu Railway
(opened 30 September 1927)
5 January 1920
43.73.2HasambongKasanpō하삼봉下三峰1 December 1922
52.89.1JongseongShōjō종성鍾城Tongpo Line1 December 1922
58.05.2SoamShōgan소암小岩1 November 1924
66.28.2TonggwanjinTōkanchin동관진東関鎮Seongpyeong Line1 November 1924
會寧炭鑛線 - 회령탄광선 - Kainei Tankō Line - Hoeryeong Tan-gwang Line
DistanceStation name
Total; kmS2S; kmTranscribed, KoreanTranscribed, Japanese Hunminjeongeum Hanja/Kanji ConnectionsOpened
0.00.0HoeryeongKainei회령會寧main line5 January 1920
5.35.3YeongsuYōsui영수永綏11 August 1928
9.23.9BonguiHōgi봉의鳳儀11 August 1928
10.61.4GyerimKeirin계림鶏林11 August 1928
細川線 - 세천선 - Saisen Line - Secheon Line
DistanceStation name
Total; kmS2S; kmTranscribed, KoreanTranscribed, Japanese Hunminjeongeum Hanja/Kanji ConnectionsOpened
0.00.0SinhakpoShinkakuho신학포新鶴浦main line5 January 1920
8.68.6SecheonSaisen세천細川1920
14.45.8JungbongChūhō중봉仲峰1920
東浦線 - 동포선 - Tōho Line - Tongpo Line
DistanceStation name
Total; kmS2S; kmTranscribed, KoreanTranscribed, Japanese Hunminjeongeum Hanja/Kanji ConnectionsOpened
0.00.0JongseongShōjō종성鍾城main line1 December 1922
15.615.6TongpoTōho동포東浦1 November 1924
城坪線 - 성평선 - Seihei Line - Songpyeong Line
DistanceStation name
Total; kmS2S; kmTranscribed, KoreanTranscribed, Japanese Hunminjeongeum Hanja/Kanji ConnectionsOpened
66.28.2TonggwanjinTōkanchin동관진東関鎮main line1 November 1924
NamjudongNanshūtō남주동南州洞1924
11.511.5SeongpyeongJōhei성평城坪1924

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References

  1. 1 2 朝鮮総督府官報 (The Public Journal of the Governor-General of Korea), Shōwa No. 669, 28 March 1929 (in Japanese)
  2. 1 2 3 http://www5f.biglobe.ne.jp/~travel-100years/travelguide_054.htm
  3. 浦野, 起央 (1955). 朝鮮の領土: 【分析・資料・文献】. 三和書籍. p. 160-161. ISBN   978-4-86251-202-4.
  4. Japanese Government Railways (1937). 鉄道停車場一覧. 昭和12年10月1日現在 [The List of Stations as of 1 October 1937] (in Japanese). Tokyo: Kawaguchi Printing Company. p. 506.
  5. "南満州鉄道株式会社全路線". Archived from the original on 2013-10-21. Retrieved 2016-01-02.
  6. Kokubu, Hayato, 将軍様の鉄道 (Shōgun-sama no Tetsudō), p. 131, ISBN   978-4-10-303731-6
  7. Kokubu, Hayato, 将軍様の鉄道 (Shōgun-sama no Tetsudō), p. 89, ISBN   978-4-10-303731-6