Dorchester South railway station

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Motive power depot

The Southampton and Dorchester Railway constructed a motive power depot at the station in 1847 together with a coal stage and turntable. This closed in 1957 and was demolished soon afterwards. [13]

Modernisation

During late 2010/early 2011, CCTV monitor podiums were installed on platform 1 (similar to those used on the London Underground) so as to allow the guards of each London-bound train to have easier visuals of the platforms (because platform 1 has a tight curve, and makes it difficult to see the length of the platform whilst a train is in the vicinity of the station). New entrances have also been constructed from the southern end of platform 1 to the adjacent car park, as well as new waiting shelters built near the new entrance and on the site of the former brick hut on platform 2.

Services

A Class 442 train from London Waterloo at Dorchester South in 2006 DorchS3.jpg
A Class 442 train from London Waterloo at Dorchester South in 2006

All services at Dorchester South are operated by South Western Railway.

On weekdays and Saturdays, the station is served by two trains per hour between London Waterloo and Weymouth. [14]

One of these is a stopping service calling at most stops northbound to Winchester, then Basingstoke, Clapham Junction and London Waterloo. Southbound this service calls at Upwey and Weymouth.

The second is a semi-fast service calling at principal stations only northbound to Winchester, then Woking and London Waterloo. Southbound, this service runs non-stop to Weymouth.

On Sundays, the service is reduced to hourly in each direction.

A less frequent service is also available from the nearby Dorchester West station, which is served by Great Western Railway, with trains heading towards Westbury, Bristol Temple Meads and Gloucester.

Dorchester South
National Rail logo.svg
Dorchester South railway station 2005-07-16 01.jpg
Dorchester South railway station in July 2005
General information
Location Dorchester, Dorset
England
Coordinates 50°42′32″N2°26′13″W / 50.709°N 2.437°W / 50.709; -2.437 Coordinates: 50°42′32″N2°26′13″W / 50.709°N 2.437°W / 50.709; -2.437
Grid reference SY692900
Managed by South Western Railway
Platforms2
Other information
Station codeDCH
Classification DfT category D
History
Original company Southampton and Dorchester Railway
Pre-grouping London and South Western Railway
Post-grouping Southern Railway
Key dates
1 June 1847 (1847-06-01)Terminus opened as Dorchester
1878Westbound through platform opened
26 September 1949Renamed Dorchester South
1970Eastbound through platform opened
Passengers
2017/18Decrease2.svg 0.440 million
 Interchange Decrease2.svg 555
Preceding station National Rail logo.svg National Rail Following station
Moreton or Wareham   South Western Railway
  Upwey or Weymouth

Notes

  1. Railways in the United Kingdom historically are measured in miles and chains. There are 80 chains to one mile.

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References

References

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  2. Williams 1968, p. 62.
  3. 1 2 Williams 1968, p. 65.
  4. Williams 1973, p. 184.
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  6. "Railway Changes" . Hampshire Advertiser. England. 25 March 1893. Retrieved 19 June 2021 via British Newspaper Archive.
  7. "Railway Appointment" . Southern Times and Dorset County Herald. England. 19 November 1898. Retrieved 19 June 2021 via British Newspaper Archive.
  8. "Mr. C.W. Eve to go to Eastleigh" . Bournemouth Guardian. England. 7 August 1915. Retrieved 19 June 2021 via British Newspaper Archive.
  9. "Stationmaster's Retirement" . Western Gazette. England. 5 January 1923. Retrieved 19 June 2021 via British Newspaper Archive.
  10. "Brockenhurst. Stationmaster's Promotion" . Hampshire Advertiser. England. 6 January 1923. Retrieved 19 June 2021 via British Newspaper Archive.
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  12. "Stationmaster Retiring" . Western Gazette. England. 9 October 1942. Retrieved 19 June 2021 via British Newspaper Archive.
  13. Hawkins & Reeve 1979, pp. 24–25.
  14. Table 158 National Rail timetable, May 2022


Sources