Dorothy Mackie Low

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Lois Dorothea Pilkington Low
BornLois Dorothea Pilkington
(1916-07-15)15 July 1916
Edinburgh, Scotland, UK
Died8 November 2002(2002-11-08) (aged 86)
Hampshire, England, UK
Pen nameDorothy Mackie Low,
Lois Paxton,
Zoë Cass
Occupation Literary agent, novelist
NationalityBritish
Period1962-1983
Genre romance
SpouseWilliam Mackie Low (1938-1981)
Children2
Roderick Craig Low (b. 1945),
Murray Alexander Robert Low (b. 1949)

Lois Dorothea Low, née Pilkington (born 15 July 1916 in Edinburgh, Scotland, UK - d. 8 November 2002 in Hampshire, England, UK) was a British writer of romance novels from 1962 to 1983 under different pseudonyms Dorothy Mackie Low, Lois Paxton, and Zoë Cass.

Romance novel literary genre

Although the genre is very old, the romance novel or romantic novel discussed in this article is the mass-market version. Novels of this type of genre fiction place their primary focus on the relationship and romantic love between two people, and must have an "emotionally satisfying and optimistic ending." There are many subgenres of the romance novel, including fantasy, historical romance, paranormal fiction, and science fiction. Romance novels are read primarily by women.

Contents

She was elected the fifth Chairman (1969–1971) of the Romantic Novelists' Association and also was a former Vice-President. [1]

The Romantic Novelists' Association (RNA) is the professional body that represents authors of romantic fiction in the United Kingdom. It was founded in 1960 by Denise Robins, Barbara Cartland, Vivian Stuart, and other authors including Elizabeth Goudge, Netta Muskett, Catherine Cookson, Rosamunde Pilcher and Lucilla Andrews.

Biography

Born Lois Dorothea Pilkington on 15 July 1916 in Edinburgh, Scotland, UK, she studied in the Edinburgh Ladies' College (now Mary Erskine School). [2] In 1938, she married William Mackie Low, who died in 1981. They had two sons: Roderick Craig Low (b. 1945) and Murray Alexander Robert Low (b. 1949). She worked in insurance and as literary agent.

Edinburgh Capital city in Scotland

Edinburgh is the capital city of Scotland and one of its 32 council areas. Historically part of the county of Midlothian, it is located in Lothian on the Firth of Forth's southern shore.

Low published romance novels from 1962 to 1983, under the pseudonyms of Dorothy Mackie Low, Lois Paxton, and Zoë Cass. She was elected the fifth Chairman (1969–1971) of the Romantic Novelists' Association and also was a former Vice-President. She died at 86, on 8 November 2002.

Bibliography

As Dorothy Mackie Low

[3]

Novels

  • Isle for a Stranger (1962)
  • Dear Liar (1963)
  • A Ripple on the Water (1964)
  • The Intruder (1965)
  • A House in the Country (1968)
  • To Burgundy and Back (1970)
  • The Glen is Ours

As Lois Paxton

[4]

Novels

  • Man Who Died Twice (1968)
  • Quiet Sound of Fear (1971)
  • Who Goes There? (1972)
  • Man in the Shadows (1983)

Anthologies in collaboration

As Zoë Cass

[5]

Novels

  • Island Of The Seven Hills (1974)
  • The Silver Leopard (1976)
  • Twist in the Silk (1980)

References and sources

  1. Past RNA Officers, archived from the original on 11 March 2016, retrieved 6 April 2009
  2. "International Who's Who of Authors and Writers 2004" Europa Publications, Routlidge, Page 341, ISBN   978-1857431797 Also available on the Internet at Google Books
  3. Dorothy Mackie Low at FantasticFiction
  4. Lois Paxton at FantasticFiction
  5. Zoe Cass at FantasticFiction


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