Doug Baker (baseball)

Last updated

Doug Baker
1985 Nashville Doug Baker.jpg
Baker with the Nashville Sounds in 1985
Infielder
Born: (1961-04-03) April 3, 1961 (age 58)
Fullerton, California
Batted: BothThrew: Right
MLB debut
July 2, 1984, for the Detroit Tigers
Last MLB appearance
April 12, 1990, for the Minnesota Twins
MLB statistics
Batting average .207
Home runs 0
Runs batted in 22
Teams
Career highlights and awards

Douglas Lee Baker (born April 3, 1961) is a former infielder in Major League Baseball (MLB) player who played with the Detroit Tigers from 1984–1987 and the Minnesota Twins from 1988–1990. Baker played in 136 Major League games and had a .207 batting average with 51 hits, 38 runs, 22 runs batted in, and 11 doubles.

Major League Baseball Professional baseball league

Major League Baseball (MLB) is a professional baseball organization, the oldest of the four major professional sports leagues in the United States and Canada. A total of 30 teams play in the National League (NL) and American League (AL), with 15 teams in each league. The NL and AL were formed as separate legal entities in 1876 and 1901 respectively. After cooperating but remaining legally separate entities beginning in 1903, the leagues merged into a single organization led by the Commissioner of Baseball in 2000. The organization also oversees Minor League Baseball, which comprises 256 teams affiliated with the Major League clubs. With the World Baseball Softball Confederation, MLB manages the international World Baseball Classic tournament.

Detroit Tigers Baseball team and Major League Baseball franchise in Detroit, Michigan, United States of America

The Detroit Tigers are an American professional baseball team based in Detroit, Michigan. The Tigers compete in Major League Baseball (MLB) as a member of the American League (AL) Central division. One of the AL's eight charter franchises, the club was founded in Detroit as a member of the minor league Western League in 1894 and is the only Western League team still in its original city. They are the oldest continuous one name, one city franchise in the AL. The Tigers have won four World Series championships, 11 AL pennants, and four AL Central division championships. The Tigers also won division titles in 1972, 1984, and 1987 as a member of the AL East. The team currently plays its home games at Comerica Park in Downtown Detroit.

Minnesota Twins Baseball team and Major League Baseball franchise in Minneapolis, Minnesota, United States

The Minnesota Twins are an American professional baseball team based in Minneapolis, Minnesota. The team competes in the Central division of the American League (AL), and is named after the Twin Cities area comprising Minneapolis and St. Paul.

Baker was the younger brother [1] of Dave Baker who also played in the Major Leagues.

David Glenn Baker is an American former professional baseball third baseman He appeared in nine games for the Toronto Blue Jays of Major League Baseball (MLB) in 1982. He is an alumnus of UCLA.

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References

  1. James, Bill (1991). The Baseball Book 1992. Villard Books. p. 362.