Doug Greenall

Last updated

Doug Greenall
Personal information
Full nameDouglas Greenall
Born7 June 1927
St Helens, Lancashire, England
Died23 December 2007(2007-12-23) (aged 80) [1]
St Helens, Merseyside, England
Playing information
Weight11 st 8 lb (73 kg)
Position Centre
Club
YearsTeamPldTGFGP
1946–59 St Helens 487188140592
1959–60 Wigan 30000
1960–61 Bradford Northern 40000
Total494188140592
Representative
YearsTeamPldTGFGP
1952–54 Lancashire 31003
1958English League XIII1
1951–53 England 650015
1951–54 Great Britain 63009
Coaching information
Club
YearsTeamGmsWDLW%
1961 Bradford Northern
Liverpool City
Total0000
Source: [2] [3] [4] [5] [6]

Douglas Greenall (7 June 1927 – 23 December 2007) was an English professional rugby league footballer who played in the 1940s, 1950s and 1960s, and coached in the 1960s. He played at representative level for Great Britain, England, English League XIII and Lancashire, and at club level for St. Helens, Wigan and Bradford Northern, as a centre, i.e. number 3 or 4, [3] and coached at club level for Bradford Northern and Liverpool City. [6]

Contents

Background

Doug Greenall was born in St Helens, Lancashire, England, he was the landlord (with his wife Vera (née Campbell)) of the Talbot Alehouse, 97 Duke Street, St Helens, and he died aged 80 in St. Helens, Merseyside, England.

Playing career

International honours

Doug Greenall, won caps for England while at St. Helens in 1951 against France, in 1952 against Other Nationalities, Wales, in 1953 against France (2 matches), Other Nationalities, [4] and won caps for Great Britain while at St. Helens in 1951 against New Zealand (3 matches), in 1952 against Australia (2 matches), and in 1954 against New Zealand. [5]

Doug Greenall also represented Great Britain in two non-Test matches while at St. Helens in the 12-22 defeat by France at Parc des Princes, Paris on 22 May 1952, and the 17-22 defeat by France at Stade de Gerland, Lyon on 24 May 1953. [7] [8]

Doug Greenall played left-centre, i.e. number 4 for English League XIII while at St Helens in the 8-26 defeat by France on Saturday 22 November 1958 at Knowsley Road, St. Helens.

Challenge Cup Final appearances

Doug Greenall played right-centre, i.e. number 3, and was captain in St Helens' 10-15 defeat by Huddersfield in the 1952–53 Challenge Cup Final during the 1952–53 season at Wembley Stadium, London on Saturday 25 April 1953, in front of a crowd of 89,588, [9] and played right-centre, i.e. number 3, in the 13-2 victory over Halifax in the 1955–56 Challenge Cup Final during the 1955–56 season at Wembley Stadium, London on Saturday 28 April 1956, in front of a crowd of 79,341.

County Cup Final appearances

Doug Greenall played right-centre, i.e. number 3, in St. Helens' 5-22 defeat by Leigh in the 1952–53 Lancashire County Cup Final during the 1952–53 season at Station Road, Swinton on Saturday 29 November 1952, played right-centre, i.e. number 3, in the 16-8 victory over Wigan in the 1953–54 Lancashire County Cup Final during the 1953–54 season at Station Road, Swinton on Saturday 24 October 1953, played right-centre, i.e. number 3, in the 3-10 defeat by Oldham in the 1956–57 Lancashire County Cup Final during the 1956–57 season at Central Park, Wigan on Saturday 20 October 1956, played right-centre, i.e. number 3, in the 2-12 defeat by Oldham in the 1958–59 Lancashire County Cup Final during the 1958–59 season at Station Road, Swinton Saturday 25 October 1958, and played right-centre, i.e. number 3, in the 5-4 defeat by Warrington in the 1959–60 Lancashire County Cup Final during the 1959–60 season at Central Park, Wigan Saturday 31 October 1959.

Testimonial match

Doug Greenall's Testimonial match at St. Helens took place against Halifax in 1952.

Honoured at St Helens R.F.C.

Doug Greenall is a St Helens R.F.C. Hall of Fame inductee. [10]

Coaching

Sporting positions
Preceded by
Trevor Foster
1960-1961
Coach
Bullscolours.svg
Bradford Northern

1961
Succeeded by
Jimmy Ledgard
1961-1962

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References

  1. Hadfield, Dave (7 January 2008). "Duggie Greenall: Great Britain rugby player". The Independent. Retrieved 23 December 2017.
  2. Whittle, Denis (2006). Duggie Greenall : A Rugby League Saint. London: London League. ISBN   978-1903659274.
  3. 1 2 "Statistics at rugbyleagueproject.org". rugbyleagueproject.org. 31 December 2017. Retrieved 1 January 2018.
  4. 1 2 "England Statistics at englandrl.co.uk". englandrl.co.uk. 31 December 2017. Archived from the original on 17 April 2018. Retrieved 1 January 2018.
  5. 1 2 "Great Britain Statistics at englandrl.co.uk". englandrl.co.uk. 31 December 2017. Archived from the original on 17 April 2018. Retrieved 1 January 2018.
  6. 1 2 "Coach Statistics at rugbyleagueproject.org". rugbyleagueproject.org. 31 December 2017. Retrieved 1 January 2018.
  7. Harry Edgar (2007). Rugby League Journal Annual 2008 Page-110. Rugby League Journal Publishing. ISBN   0-9548355-3-0
  8. Robert Gate (2009). Rugby League Lions: 100 Years of Test Matches. Page 249. Vertical Editions. ISBN   978-1-904091-25-7
  9. McCorquodale, London S.E (25 April 1953). The Rugby League Challenge Cup Competition - Final Tie - Huddersfield v St. Helens - Match Programme. Wembley Stadium Ltd. ISBN n/a
  10. "St Helens Hall of Fame". saints.org.uk. 31 December 2011. Retrieved 1 January 2012.