Dragon (zodiac)

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Dragon
Dragon (Regular Chinese characters).svg
"Dragon" in Traditional (top) and Simplified (bottom) Chinese characters
Traditional Chinese
Simplified Chinese
Zodiac dragon, showing the long (Long ) character for dragon OMBRE CHINOISE DRAGON.jpg
Zodiac dragon, showing the lóng (龍) character for dragon

The Dragon (simplified Chinese : ; traditional Chinese : ) is the fifth of the 12-year cycle of animals which appear in the Chinese zodiac related to the Chinese calendar. The Year of the Dragon is associated with the Earthly Branch symbol , pronounced chen.

Contents

It has been proposed by one academic researcher that the Earthly Branch character may have been associated with scorpions; it may have symbolized the star Antares. [1] In the Buddhist calendar used in Thailand, Cambodia, Laos, Myanmar, and Sri Lanka, the Dragon is replaced by the nāga. [2] In the Gurung zodiac, the Dragon is replaced by the eagle. [3] In Old Turkic calendar it is replaced by the fish or crocodile. Early Persian translations of the medieval period change to dragon to a sea serpent although in current times is generally refer to as whale. [4] [5]

Years and the Five Elements

The Water Dragon Lantern Festival Chinese Dragon 2012.jpg
The Water Dragon Lantern Festival

People born within these date ranges can be said to have been born in the "Year of the Dragon", while bearing the following elemental sign:

Start dateEnd dateHeavenly branch
16 February 19043 February 1905 Wood Dragon
4 February 191622 January 1917 Fire Dragon
23 January 19289 February 1929 Earth Dragon
8 February 194026 January 1941 Metal Dragon
27 January 195213 February 1953 Water Dragon
13 February 19641 February 1965 Wood Dragon
31 January 197617 February 1977 Fire Dragon
17 February 19885 February 1989 Earth Dragon
5 February 200023 January 2001 Metal Dragon
23 January 20129 February 2013 Water Dragon
10 February 202428 January 2025 Wood Dragon
28 January 203614 February 2037 Fire Dragon
14 February 20481 February 2049 Earth Dragon
2 February 206020 January 2061 Metal Dragon
19 February 20726 February 2073 Water Dragon
6 February 208425 January 2085 Wood Dragon
25 January 209611 February 2097 Fire Dragon

There are typically marked spikes in the birth rates of countries that use the Chinese zodiac or places with substantial Overseas Chinese populations during the year of the Dragon, because such "Dragon babies" are considered to be lucky and have desirable characteristics that supposedly lead to better life outcomes. [6] [7] The relatively recent phenomenon of planning a child's birth in the Dragon year has led to hospital undercapacity issues and even an uptick in infant mortality rates toward the end of these years due to strained neonatal resources.

Compatibility

SignBest Match/ Balance (1st Trine Group)MatchNo Match/ Rival-Enemy-Obstacle (Opposite Sign)
Dragon Monkey, Rat, Rooster Snake, Pig, Rabbit, Tiger, Horse Dog , Ox , Goat

Cycle: (Trine Group) Dragon needs Monkey, Monkey needs Rat, Rat needs Dragon; (Opposite Sign) but his rival opposes the Dog.

Basic astrology elements

Earthly Branches:Chen
The Five Elements: Earth
Yin Yang:Yang
Lunar Month:Third
Lucky Numbers:1, 6, 7; Avoid: 3, 8, 9
Lucky Colors:yellow; Avoid: blue, green
Season:Spring

Related Research Articles

Chinese calendar Lunisolar calendar from China

The traditional Chinese calendar, is a lunisolar calendar which reckons years, months and days according to astronomical phenomena. In China it is defined by the Chinese national standard GB/T 33661–2017, "Calculation and promulgation of the Chinese calendar", issued by the Standardisation Administration of China on May 12, 2017.

Chinese astrology is based on the traditional astronomy and calendars. Chinese astrology came to flourish during the Han Dynasty.

Thai solar calendar

The Thai solar calendar was adopted by King Chulalongkorn in 1888 CE as the Siamese version of the Gregorian calendar, replacing the Thai lunar calendar as the legal calendar in Thailand. Years are now counted in the Buddhist Era (B.E.): พุทธศักราช, พ.ศ., which is 543 years ahead of the Gregorian calendar.

Pig (zodiac) Sign of the Chinese zodiac

The Pig () or sometimes Boar is the twelfth of the 12-year cycle of animals which appear in Chinese zodiac, in relation to the Chinese calendar and system of horology, and paralleling the system of ten Heavenly Stems and twelve Earthly Branches. Although the term "zodiac" is used in the phrase "Chinese zodiac", there is a major difference between the Chinese usage and Western astrology: the zodiacal animals do not relate to the zodiac as the area of the sky that extends approximately 8° north or south of the ecliptic, the apparent path of the Sun, the Moon, and visible planets across the celestial sphere's constellations, over the course of the year.

Rabbit (zodiac) Sign of the Chinese zodiac

The Rabbit () is the fourth in the 12-year cycle of animals that appear in the Chinese zodiac related to the Chinese calendar. The Year of the Rabbit is associated with the Earthly Branch symbol 卯.

Tiger (zodiac) Sign of the Chinese zodiac

The Tiger () is the third of the 12-year cycle of animals which appear in the Chinese zodiac related to the Chinese calendar. The Year of the Tiger is associated with the Earthly Branch symbol 寅.

Dog (zodiac) Sign of Chinese zodiac

The Dog () is eleventh of the 12-year cycle of animals which appear in the Chinese zodiac related to the Chinese calendar. The Year of the Dog is associated with the Earthly Branch symbol 戌. The character 狗, also refers to the actual animal while 戌, also refers to the zodiac animal.

Snake (zodiac) Sign of the Chinese zodiac

The Snake () is the sixth of the 12-year cycle of animals which appear in the Chinese zodiac related to the Chinese calendar. The Year of the Snake is associated with the Earthly Branch symbol 巳.

Monkey (zodiac) Sign of the Chinese zodiac

The Monkey () is the ninth of the 12-year cycle of animals which appear in the Chinese zodiac related to the Chinese calendar. The Year of the Monkey is associated with the Earthly Branch symbol .

Ox (zodiac) Sign of the Chinese zodiac

The Ox () is the second of the 12-year periodic sequence (cycle) of animals which appear in the Chinese zodiac related to the Chinese calendar, and also appears in related calendar systems. The Chinese term translated here as ox is in Chinese niú (牛), a word generally referring to cows, bulls, or neutered types of the bovine family, such as common cattle or water buffalo. The zodiacal ox may be construed as male, female, neutered, hermaphroditic, and either singular or plural. The Year of the Ox is also denoted by the Earthly Branch symbol chǒu (丑). The term "zodiac" ultimately derives from an Ancient Greek term referring to a "circle of little animals". There are also a yearly month of the ox and a daily hour of the ox. Years of the oxen (cows) are cyclically differentiated by correlation to the Heavenly Stems cycle, resulting in a repeating cycle of five years of the ox/cow, each ox/cow year also being associated with one of the Chinese wǔxíng, also known as the "five elements", or "phases": the "Five Phases" being Fire, Water, Wood, Metal, and Earth. The Year of the Ox follows after the Year of the Rat which happened in 2020 and it then is followed by the Year of the Tiger, which will happen in 2022.

Rat (zodiac) Sign of the Chinese zodiac

The Rat or Mouse () is the first of the repeating 12-year cycle of animals which appear in the Chinese zodiac, constituting part of the Chinese calendar system. The Year of the Rat in standard Chinese is ; the rat is associated with the first branch of the Earthly Branch symbol 子 (), which starts a repeating cycle of twelve years. The Chinese word shǔ (鼠) refers to various types of Muroidea, such as rats and mice. The term "zodiac" ultimately derives from an Ancient Greek term referring to a "circle of little animals". There are also a yearly month of the rat and a daily hour of the rat. Years of the rat are cyclically differentiated by correlation to the Heavenly Stems cycle, resulting in a repeating cycle of five years of the rat, each rat year also being associated with one of the Chinese wu xing, also known as the "five elements", or "phases": the "Five Phases" being Fire, Water, Wood, Metal, and Earth.

Earthly Branches East Asian system of 12 ordinals

The twelve Earthly Branches or Terrestrial Branches are a Chinese ordering system used throughout East Asia in various contexts, including its ancient dating system, astrological traditions, zodiac and ordinals.

Astrological sign Twelve 30° sectors of the ecliptic, as defined by Western astrology

In Western astrology, astrological signs are the twelve 30° sectors of the ecliptic, starting at the vernal equinox, also known as the First Point of Aries. The order of the astrological signs is Aries, Taurus, Gemini, Cancer, Leo, Virgo, Libra, Scorpio, Sagittarius, Capricorn, Aquarius and Pisces. Each sector was named for a constellation within it in the time of naming. These divisions were also used in scientific astronomy until the 19th century in some cases; see ecliptic coordinates.

The Tibetan calendar, or Tibetan lunar calendar is a lunisolar calendar, that is, the Tibetan year is composed of either 12 or 13 lunar months, each beginning and ending with a new moon. A thirteenth month is added every two or three years, so that an average Tibetan year is equal to the solar year.

Rasulid dynasty

The Rasulids were a Sunni Muslim dynasty that ruled Yemen from 1229 to 1454.

Thai calendar

In Thailand, two main calendar systems are used alongside each other: the Thai solar calendar, based on the Gregorian calendar and is used for official and most day-to-day purposes, and the Thai lunar calendar, used for traditional events and Buddhist religious practices.

The Cat is the fourth animal symbol in the 12-year cycle of the Vietnamese zodiac and Gurung zodiac, taking place of the Rabbit in the Chinese zodiac. As such, the traits associated with the Rabbit are attributed to the Cat. Cats are in conflict with the Rat.

Chinese zodiac Lunar calendar classicifactions

The Chinese zodiac, or simply zodiac is a classification scheme based on the lunar calendar that assigns an animal and its reputed attributes to each year in a repeating 12-year cycle. The 12-year cycle is an approximation to the 11.85-year orbital period of Jupiter. Originating from China, the zodiac and its variations remain popular in many East Asian and Southeast Asian countries, such as Japan, South Korea, Vietnam, Cambodia, and Thailand.

Rooster (zodiac) Sign of the Chinese zodiac

The Rooster is the tenth of the 12-year cycle of animals which appear in the Chinese zodiac related to the Chinese calendar. The Year of the Rooster is represented by the Earthly Branch symbol 酉.

Snakes in Chinese mythology Mythological serpent

Snakes are an important motif in Chinese mythology. There are various myths, legends, and folk tales about snakes. Chinese mythology refers to these and other myths found in the historical geographic area(s) of China. These myths include Chinese and other languages, as transmitted by Han Chinese as well as other ethnic groups. Snakes often appear in myth, religion, legend, or tales as fantastic beings unlike any possible real snake, often having a mix of snake with other body parts, such as having a human head, or magical abilities, such as shape shifting. One famous snake that was able to transform back and forth between a snake and a human being was Madam White Snake in the Legend of the White Snake. Other snakes or snakelike beings sometimes include deities, such as Fuxi and Nüwa and Gong Gong. Sometimes Fuxi and Nuwa are described as snakes with human heads and sometimes as humans with dragon or serpent tails.

References

  1. Richard S. Cook (Spring 1997). "The Etymology of Chinese Chen". Linguistics of the Tibeto-Burman Area. University of California, Berkeley (published Fall 1995). 18 (2): 250. ISSN   0731-3500. LCCN   82-640813. OCLC   4790670.Check date values in: |publication-date= (help)
  2. "Year of the Dragon – Naga – Thai Zodiac". Thai Guide to Thailand. Archived from the original on 8 July 2017. Retrieved 9 June 2017.
  3. "Tamu (Gurung) Losar Festival". ECS Nepal. 11 July 2010. Archived from the original on 29 July 2017. Retrieved 9 June 2017.
  4. Rasulid Hexaglot. P. B. Golden, ed., The King's Dictionary: The Rasūlid Hexaglot – Fourteenth Century Vocabularies in Arabic, Persian, Turkic, Greek, Armenian and Mongol, tr. T. Halasi- Kun, P. B. Golden, L. Ligeti, and E. Schütz, HO VIII/4, Leiden, 2000.
  5. Jan Gyllenbok, Encyclopaedia of Historical Metrology, Weights, and Measures, Volume 1, 2018, p. 244.
  6. Goodkind, Daniel (1991). "Creating new traditions in modern Chinese populations: Aiming for birth in the Year of the Dragon". Population and Development Review. 17: 663–686. doi:10.2307/1973601.
  7. Goodkind, Daniel (1996). "Chinese lunar birth timing in Singapore: New concerns for child quality amidst multicultural modernity". Journal of Marriage and the Family. 58: 784–795. doi:10.2307/353736.